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Oxygen, aerobic life found deep beneath the ocean floor
Texas A&M Today
Evidence of oxygen-breathing microbial life has been found in places where scientists did not think life could exist — such as more than 200 feet below the ocean floor that is more than 12,000 feet below sea level in the Pacific Ocean — according to a team of international researchers that includes a Texas A&M University research scientist.
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Ancient ocean linked to supercontinent's breakup
Science News for Students
The breakup of an ancient supercontinent may have been an outside job. That's the conclusion of a scientist who re-examined what tectonic plates were doing around 200 million years ago. Those plates carry the landmasses and seafloors as they move across Earth's syrupy, bendable mantle. The scientist concludes that Pangaea appears to have been ripped apart. And the shrinking of the ancestor of the Indian Ocean may have been all it took to do that, according to a newly published analysis.
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Geological study shows huge tsunami hit Cádiz 4,000 years ago
Spanish News Today
A geological study on the beach of Barbate in the province of Cádiz, Spain, has concluded that sedimentary deposits indicate the effects of a huge tsunami around 4,000 years ago, and that another seven massive tidal waves have affected the coast of Andalucí a over the course of the last 7,000 years.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Tsunami.


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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 National Award recipients
AIPG
Ben H. Parker Memorial Medal — David M. Abbott, CPG-04570, Denver, Colorado
Martin Van Couvering Memorial Award — James A. Jacobs, CPG-07760, Mill Valley, California
Award of Honorary Membership — Dennis Pennington, CPG-04401, Maple Glen, Pennsylvania
Outstanding Achievement Award — Karl Karlstrom and Laura Crossey, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Awards will be presented at the AIPG National Annual Meeting in Anchorage, Alaska, on Sept. 21, at the Hilton Anchorage Hotel. For award descriptions, past recipients and nomination information, follow the "Read More" link.

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AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award — Submittal deadline is June 30
AIPG
The purpose of the AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award is to recognize the most outstanding student chapter for their participation in, and contribution to, the American Institute of Professional Geologists. The award will consist of a plaque to be presented to the student chapter, a certificate to each of the officers of the chapter at the time of their submittal, a $500 award for the chapter and a trip for one member of the winning student chapter to the annual AIPG conference and executive meetings. The student that attends the annual meeting will observe the organization and functions of AIPG and participate in the executive board meeting.
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AIPG Section Leadership Award — Submittal deadline is May 31
AIPG
The AIPG Section Leadership Award was established by the Executive Committee in 2013 to recognize one or more of our members who have demonstrated a long-term commitment and have been long-term contributors to AIPG at the section level. AIPG has many sections where one or more individuals have demonstrated exceptional leadership for their section and in many instances kept the section together and moving forward. These individuals are commonly not known at the National level or by AIPG members outside of their sections, however, their contributions have been vital to their sections and they perform this work because of their commitment to our profession and AIPG. The award will consist of a plaque (or similar) that will be presented to the awardees at the banquet of the annual meeting of AIPG.
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What types of positions are master's students pursuing?
American Geosciences Institute
The Geoscience Career Master's Preparation Survey (Geo Career MaPS), funded by the National Science Foundation, investigated which types of positions Master's candidates were most likely to pursue. The survey, developed by AGI and AAG, asked faculty which types of positions their advisees have most often accepted post graduation, and asked enrolled students which positions they were interested in pursuing. In addition, these data are compared to what positions non-academic professionals currently hold. The data for this Currents are reported from Geology and Geography departments whose Master's programs are not intended to prepare students to pursue a Ph.D.

Follow the "Read More" link to view the latest Geoscience Currents online.

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EARTH Magazine
AIPG
The American Geosciences Institute is happy to offer a free 90-day (3 issues) trial for the digital versions of EARTH Magazine. AGI has published EARTH since 1956 (as Geotimes through 2008) and now we invite you to check us out with no obligation. After 90 days, if you wish to subscribe it is $20 annually. Go to www.earthmagazine.org/trial to get started.
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AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist
AIPG
The AIPG quarterly journal, The Professional Geologist, January/February/March 2015 — Student themed issue is now available online. We now have a new digital e-pub available. Let us know what you think and if you have any comments or suggests. Email us at aipg@aipg.org.
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AIPG Section Newsletters
AIPG
  • The AIPG Colorado Section Newsletter — March 2015 is now online.
  • The AIPG Minnesota Section Newsletter — February 2015 is now online.
  • The AIPG Georgia Section Newsletter — February/March 2015 is now online.
  • The AIPG Ohio Section Newsletter — February 2015 is now online.
  • The AIPG Georgia Section Newsletter — February 2015 is now online.
  • The AIPG California Section Newsletter — February 2015 is now online.

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    AIPG call for abstracts — Ohio 2015 Conference
    AIPG
    Submit an abstract by March 23. AIPG Conference on The Expanding World of Unconventional Shale Hydrocarbon Resources — The role of Hydraulic Fracturing in the Development of the Utica, Marcellus and other Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin with Ohio's Geology in Core and Outcrop Short Course and Field Trip. The conference is being held April 27-29, in Columbus, Ohio. Presentations are on April 28 and 29 with a half day short course and a half day field trip on April 27. Co-hosted by the AIPG Ohio Section. Sponsors and Exhibitors are welcome. For additional information contact Cathy Duran at cld@aipg.org or call 303-412-6205. Register online or pdf form | Ad Flyer | Exhibitor Form | Sponsor Form
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    AIPG call for abstracts — Alaska 2015 National Conference
    AIPG
    Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists at the 2015 Annual National Conference in Anchorage, Alaska! Present and attend the technical sessions on Sept. 21-22. The technical session presentations will be held at the Hilton Anchorage Hotel, 500 West Third Avenue, in Anchorage, Alaska. Contact the hotel at 1-800-HILTONS. The room rate is $137. To have your abstract considered for a presentation please submit an abstract online by May 4.
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    AIPG call for abstracts — 2015 Energy Exposition
    AIPG
    Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists at the 2015 Energy Exposition in Billings, Montana! Register online or fill out the registration form. Present and attend the technical sessions organized and hosted by AIPG on June 24th-25th with an optional field trip: Transect Across the Beartooth Mountains Front Laramide Triangle Zone: Dean, Montana to The Golf Course. Trip leader: Ennis Geraghty, Senior Project Geologist, Stillwater Mining Company on Friday, June 26. The schedule is structured to allow plenty of time to browse and participate in the Energy Exposition. Registration will include "Breakfast and a Movie" both days, lunch and reduced ticket pricing for the Expo dinner on June 25. Click here for additional information on the Energy Exposition. The technical session presentations will be held at the Rimrock Arena within the MetraPark Expo Center, 308 6th Avenue N., Billings, Montana. To have your abstract considered for a presentation please submit an abstract online by March 30.
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    AIPG luggage grips
    AIPG
    Show off your AIPG membership with this neon foam identifier that wraps around the luggage strap for quick ID on a bustling carousel of bags. This 2"h x 5 5/8"w x 5/8"d gripper also cushions business portfolio handles and stays secure with a Velcro® closure. Available in the following colors: red, blue, neon orange, neon green. The price is $6 for AIPG members. Shipping is included in the cost.
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    AIPG baseball cap
    AIPG
    AIPG's baseball cap has a velcro enclosure and embroidered lettering. Available colors: black, royal blue, tan, white and navy.

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    AIPG T-shirts available
    AIPG
    White T-shirt with AIPG logo on the front and "Geologists are Gneiss, Tuff and a Little Wacke" the on back. Available sizes: Small-2XLarge. (An additional $1.50 will be added for 2XL.) The AIPG member price is $23. (Price includes shipping.)


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    MARK YOUR CALENDAR

    Date Event More Information
    March 14-21 AIPG Kentucky Section Bahamas Short Course Field Trip Announcements
    April 11 AIPG Georgia Section Field Trip Southern Ionics Heavy Mineral Mine
    April 27-29 AIPG Energy & Shale in the Appalachian Basin Columbus, Ohio
    May 15-16 AIPG National Executive Committee Meeting Thornton, Colorado
    June 16-17 5th Annual AIPG Michigan Section Technical Workshop — Site Characterization Roscommon County, Michigan
    June 24-25 2015 Energy Exposition with Technical Sessions Presented by AIPG Billings, Montana
    Sept. 19-22 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section
    Sept. 29-30 AIPG Georgia Section: "Innovative Environmental Assessment of Remediation Technology Kennesaw, Georgia
    Sept. 9-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


    INDUSTRY NEWS


    Curiosity regains use of arm, recommences Mars science
    Discovery News
    Good news from Mars: Rover Curiosity has regained use of its robotic arm after an electrical glitch forced mission scientists to suspend drilling work at the base of Mount Sharp. On Feb. 27, while using the percussion action in its arm-mounted drill to shake rock powder from the drill to the sample processing device, an abnormal electrical current was detected and Curiosity automatically put itself into safe mode to avoid any potentially crippling damage.
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    Why are Great Plains a mile high? Colorado geologists have a theory
    The Associated Press via The Denver Post
    Geologists might finally be able to explain why Denver is a mile high. A new theory suggests that chemical reactions, triggered by water far below the Earth's surface, could have made part of the North American plate less dense many millions of years ago, when the continents we know today were still forming.
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    Princeton University geologists mapping the Earth's mantle in 3-D
    Environmental News Network
    Princeton geosciences professor Jeroen Tromp and his team have embarked on an ambitious project to use earthquakes to map the Earth's entire mantle. For the task, his team will use one of the world's fastest supercomputers, Titan, which can perform more than 20 quadrillion calculations per second and is located at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee.
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    Geophysicists study creep and flow of rivers
    Penn Current
    What do glass, dirty ice, and riverbeds have in common? All are disordered solids, meaning they have malleable internal structures that can rearrange themselves over time. Scientists know that when force is applied to a disordered solid, structural changes will occur, impacting the material's resistance to flow. Using a custom laboratory apparatus, Penn geophysicists have shown that riverbeds behave similarly, with sediment particles rearranging in response to fluid forces.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
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    Underwater volcano eruption creates new island in the Pacific Ocean
    ZME Science
    An eruption from an underwater volcano in the Pacific "Ring of Fire" caused a 1-km wide island to form. Satellite footage from January showed how the island formed, due to an eruption from the Hunga Tonga underwater volcano, near Tonga. The Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai is a volcano located about 30 kilometers south-southeast of the Tonga Falcon island, located above a very active subduction area, extending from New Zealand north-northeast to Fiji.
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    Staying power for shale gas
    Harvard Gazette
    The natural gas boom that transformed the energy picture in the United States in the last decade is still in its infancy, says John Shaw, chair of Harvard's Earth and Planetary Sciences Department. Shaw, the Harry C. Dudley Professor of Structural and Economic Geology and a professor of environmental science and engineering, expects natural gas to continue to displace coal in electricity generation. It is projected to become the nation's largest electricity-generating fuel by 2040.
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    Naturally acidic waters of Puget Sound surround University of Washington's Friday Harbor Labs
    University of Washington
    For more than 100 years, marine biologists at Friday Harbor Laboratories have studied the ecology of everything from tiny marine plants to giant sea stars. Now, as the oceans are undergoing a historic shift in chemistry, the lab is establishing itself as a place to study what that will mean for marine life. And the University of Washington laboratory is uniquely placed in naturally acidic waters that may be some of the first pushed over the edge by human-generated carbon emissions.
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    Cosmologists spends month searching for meteorites in Anarctica
    Phys.org
    Every austral summer, a group of volunteers heads off to a remote region of Antarctica to set up a field camp on the ice. For the next month, they search the ice and nearby debris piles left by glaciers for dark rocks that might be extraterrestrial in origin. The program is called the Antarctic Search for Meteorites. ANSMET has been led for the past 20 years by geologist Ralph Harvey of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. Over the years many Washington University in St. Louis geologists, physicists and astrophysicists have volunteered to help.
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