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New tool to understand volcanic supereruptions
R&D
To understand when and why volcanoes erupt, scientists study the rocks left behind by eruptions past. A method called geobarometry uses the composition of volcanic rocks to estimate the pressure and depth at which molten magma was stored just before it erupted. A research team led by a Brown University geologist has tested a new type of geobarometer that is well-suited to study the kind of magma often produced in explosive and destructive volcanic eruptions, particularly supereruptions.
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Virginia Tech geologist leads international team to reveal how continents were generated
Augusta Free Press
An international research team, led by a Virginia Tech geoscientist, has revealed information about how continents were generated on Earth more than 2.5 billion years ago &mdsah; and how those processes have continued within the last 70 million years to profoundly affect the planet's life and climate. The study details how relatively recent geologic events — volcanic activity 10 million years ago in what is now Panama and Costa Rica — hold the secrets of the extreme continent-building that took place billions of years earlier.
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New evidence shows carbon's importance to ocean life's survival 252 million years ago
Astrobiology Magazine
A new study led by scientists with The University of Texas at Arlington demonstrates for the first time how elemental carbon became an important construction material of some forms of ocean life after one of the greatest mass extinctions in the history of Earth more than 252 million years ago.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Carbon.


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AIPG NEWS


Medical coverage if you have a job change
Geocare Benefits
If you have recently had a job change or become self-employed and need medical insurance, AIPG's Geocare Private Medical Insurance Exchange is an excellent resource for you in obtaining new coverage. Loss of employment is considered a qualifying event for guaranteed coverage within a limited time following termination. For assistance, please call the Exchange at 877-739-7845 or visit the Exchange's website.
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An update from the NYS Council Professional Geologists, Transition Committee Chair and Past-President John M. Nadeau, CPG-11181
AIPG
The law that establishes the profession of geology in New York State was signed by Gov. Cuomo in November 2014. This law is identified as Chapter 475 of 2014. As a requirement to signing that legislation, the Governor noted that three specific Chapter Amendments were needed to 1) correct a typographical error, 2) allow flexibility in administrating future exams, and 3) to appoint geologists to the joint Professional Board for Engineering, Land Surveying, and Geology, in order to facilitate the regulation-writing phase in a timely manner. Those Chapter Amendments that were requested by the Governor passed both legislative houses in early March, and then were forwarded to Gov. Cuomo's office where he signed the amendments on March 16. The amendment legislation was codified into law as Chapter 9 of the Laws of 2015.

To appoint representative geologists on the Licensing Board, the State Education Department, Office of the Professions reviewed the applications of several geologists during January and February. Three people were referred to the NYS Board of Regents and were approved at their March 2015 meeting. The approval by the Regents and the governor's signature on the Chapter Amendments were the final hurdles to geologists being added to the Licensing Board. We are pleased to announce that David A. Franzi, Ph.D., William J. Kelly, Ph.D., and Jean Neubeck, CPG-11438, were confirmed by the Regents on March 17. Now that three geologist representatives have been added to the joint Board, a committee will be formed to prepare the regulations for the State Education Department.

The NYS State Education Department portal to download applications, review the (pending) regulations, once those are established, and other information for the Profession of Geology can be accessed here. As always, you are welcome to contact John at jnadeau@alphageoscience.com with questions regarding the process of the law's establishment and implementation.

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AIPG Section Newsletters now online
AIPG
  • The AIPG Michigan Section Newsletter — April 2015
  • The AIPG Illinois-Indiana Section Newsletter — Spring 2015
  • The AIPG California Newsletter — Spring 2015
  • The AIPG Wisconsin Newsletter — Spring 2015

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    AIPG call for abstracts deadline extended — 2015 Energy Exposition
    AIPG
    Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists at the 2015 Energy Exposition in Billings, Montana! Register online or fill out the registration form. Present and attend the technical sessions organized and hosted by AIPG on June 24th-25th with an optional field trip: Transect Across the Beartooth Mountains Front Laramide Triangle Zone: Dean, Montana to The Golf Course. Trip leader: Ennis Geraghty, Senior Project Geologist, Stillwater Mining Company on Friday, June 26. The schedule is structured to allow plenty of time to browse and participate in the Energy Exposition. Registration will include "Breakfast and a Movie" both days, lunch and reduced ticket pricing for the Expo dinner on June 25. Click here for additional information on the Energy Exposition. The technical session presentations will be held at the Rimrock Arena within the MetraPark Expo Center, 308 6th Avenue N., Billings, Montana. To have your abstract considered for a presentation please submit an abstract online by April 13. List of Presentations/Presenters.
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    Ohio 2015 Conference — Registration is open
    AIPG
    AIPG Conference on The Expanding World of Unconventional Shale Hydrocarbon Resources — The role of Hydraulic Fracturing in the Development of the Utica, Marcellus and other Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin with Ohio's Geology in Core and Outcrop Short Course and Field Trip. The conference is being held April 27-29, in Columbus, Ohio. Presentations are on April 28 and 29 with a half day short course and a half day field trip on April 27. Co-hosted by the AIPG Ohio Section. Sponsors and Exhibitors are welcome. List of Presentations/Presenters. Register online or pdf form | Ad Flyer | Exhibitor Form | Sponsor Form
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    AIPG call for abstracts — Alaska 2015 National Conference
    AIPG
    Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists at the 2015 Annual National Conference in Anchorage, Alaska! Present and attend the technical sessions on Sept. 21-22. The technical session presentations will be held at the Hilton Anchorage Hotel, 500 West Third Avenue, in Anchorage, Alaska. Contact the hotel at 1-800-HILTONS. The room rate is $137. To have your abstract considered for a presentation please submit an abstract online by May 4.
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    AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award — Submittal deadline is June 30
    AIPG
    The purpose of the AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award is to recognize the most outstanding student chapter for their participation in, and contribution to, the American Institute of Professional Geologists. The award will consist of a plaque to be presented to the student chapter, a certificate to each of the officers of the chapter at the time of their submittal, a $500 award for the chapter and a trip for one member of the winning student chapter to the annual AIPG conference and executive meetings. The student that attends the annual meeting will observe the organization and functions of AIPG and participate in the executive board meeting.
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    AIPG Section Leadership Award — Submittal deadline is May 31
    AIPG
    The AIPG Section Leadership Award was established by the Executive Committee in 2013 to recognize one or more of our members who have demonstrated a long-term commitment and have been long-term contributors to AIPG at the section level. AIPG has many sections where one or more individuals have demonstrated exceptional leadership for their section and in many instances kept the section together and moving forward. These individuals are commonly not known at the National level or by AIPG members outside of their sections, however, their contributions have been vital to their sections and they perform this work because of their commitment to our profession and AIPG. The award will consist of a plaque (or similar) that will be presented to the awardees at the banquet of the annual meeting of AIPG.
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    AIPG tall cafe mug
    AIPG
    This tall 16 oz. cobalt blue cafe mug has a glossy finished exterior with an easy to hold handle. It is safe in the microwave and features the AIPG logo in microwavable metallic gold.


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    AIPG mouse pad
    AIPG
    Order yours today!

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    AIPG baseball cap
    AIPG
    AIPG's baseball cap has a velcro enclosure and embroidered lettering. Available colors: black, royal blue, tan, white and navy.

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    MARK YOUR CALENDAR

    Date Event More Information
    April 11 AIPG Georgia Section Field Trip Southern Ionics Heavy Mineral Mine
    April 17 AIPG Kentucky Section: Unconventional Hydrocarbon (Gas-Shale) Exploration and Production in Kentucky — Technical Session Registration
    April 18 AIPG Kentucky Section: Unconventional Hydrocarbon (Gas-Shale) Exploration and Production in Kentucky — Field Trip Registration
    April 27-29 AIPG Energy & Shale in the Appalachian Basin Columbus, Ohio
    May 15-16 AIPG National Executive Committee Meeting Thornton, Colorado
    June 2-3 An Introduction to Surficial Geology in Massachusetts and the Geologic History of Cape Cod Bourne, Massachusetts
    June 16-17 5th Annual AIPG Michigan Section Technical Workshop — Site Characterization Roscommon County, Michigan
    June 24-25 2015 Energy Exposition with Technical Sessions Presented by AIPG Billings, Montana
    Sept. 19-22 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section
    Sept. 29-30 AIPG Georgia Section: "Innovative Environmental Assessment of Remediation Technology Kennesaw, Georgia
    Sept. 9-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


    INDUSTRY NEWS


    Assistant professor receives grant to study Rocky Mountains
    The Shorthorn
    The National Science Foundation granted Majie Fan, earth and environmental science assistant professor, $485,627 to study the Rocky Mountains. Researchers are puzzled as to how the Rocky Mountains have grown into such a gigantic mountain chain, which was once at sea level 80 million years ago. Fan said she'll being using two techniques to study the Rockies. One method, called clumped isotope geothermometry, is an advancement geologists are using to determine when the mountain became higher by researching the temperature of the mineral carbonate.
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    Looking for water? Try Jupiter's largest moon
    PRI
    For decades, scientists have suspected that several of the moons of Jupiter have liquid water, and lots of it, deep below their icy surfaces. Now, a pair of discoveries made in the last three weeks has further confirmed the presence of an ocean beneath the surface of Ganymede, the biggest moon orbiting Jupiter and the largest satellite in the solar system.
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    Panel says seas could rise up to 10.6 inches on North Carolina coast by 2045
    The Charlotte Observer
    North Carolinians should get ready for a sea-level rise over the next three decades that could be as little as 3.5 inches on the southern coast and as much as 10.6 inches in the northern Outer Banks, a state science advisory panel said March 31. The 43-page report assesses scenarios for sea-level change around five tide gauges from Duck in Dare County to Southport in Brunswick County. The seas are rising faster along the northern coast, the panel said, for two reasons.
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    UV light brings seashell fossils back to colorful life
    The American Register
    Scientists have used ultraviolet light to bring ancient fossilized seashells that look white to the naked eye back to colorful life after laying bleached from sun, sand, water and wind for millions of years. UV cameras have been used to great effect in the paleontology field already in identifying the remains of feathers that cling to the remains of fossilized dinosaurs. Now a geologist has adapted the use of these cameras to figure out what ancient cone snail fossils discovered in the Dominican Republic looked while they were alive and before the ravages of time destroyed their coloration.
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    New underwater mining robot under development
    PACE Today
    A new program has been launched to develop new underwater mining systems. Under the European Union's Horizon 2020 program a three and a half year, 12.6 million Euro R&D project is examining robotic underwater mining systems. Dubbed ¡VAMOS! (Viable Alternative Mine Operating System), the project is focused in designing and building a robotic underwater mining prototype as well as associated launch and recovery equipment.
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    Where on Earth does lightning flash most?
    Earth Sky
    Where on our planet does lightning flash most frequently? According to satellite observations, lightning occurs more often over land than over the oceans. And lightning seems to happen more often closer to the equator. According to NASA's Daniel Cecil, a member of the Global Hydrology and Climate Center's lightning team, the data also have revealed some interesting regional trends.
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    5 states feel New Madrid quake
    Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette
    A magnitude-3.6 earthquake centered in southeastern Missouri rattled homes in Arkansas as far away as Searcy on April 1 and was felt in five other states. The New Madrid Seismic Zone is a series of faults that run from southern Indiana to northeast Arkansas. A second jog cuts from southern Missouri and into northwestern Tennessee. Four of the largest earthquakes in the continental United States happened during the winter of 1811-12, when temblors measuring from 7.0 to 8.1 in magnitude rumbled under northeast Arkansas and the Missouri bootheel.
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