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Unmanned aircraft aiding geologists could face legal challenges
KIDK-TV
VideoBrief As geologists and engineers work to try to understand a slow-moving landslide and how they can stop it, a camera-mounted unmanned aircraft is helping keep them informed of what's happening on the ground. But while many say the imagery is invaluable, it may also be in violation of Federal Aviation Administration regulations.
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Satellite images boost prospector 'toolbox'
ScienceNetwork Western Australia
Geologists are working to develop tools to help choose iron ore exploration sites throughout the Yilgarn Craton, which comprises much of Western Australia's Goldfields. Geological Survey of Western Australia expert Dr Paul Duuring says much of the craton's iron ore began as Banded Ironstone Formations, which originated as iron and silica silt deposits on sections of the former tectonic plate when its surface was underwater.
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Contemporary Geoscientists of China: Hong-fu Yin, palaeontologist
GT & Associates
Professor Hong-fu Yin was the best student of the graduate class of Shanghai Yu Cai High School in 1952 at the age of 17. He did not apply for fashionable majors or important universities after high school graduation, instead he applied for the mundane course of "Coal Geology" at Beijing College of Geology. He said the urgent target of the new China was to look for geological resources, which were demanded by the industry.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG Section Leadership Award — Deadline May 31
AIPG
The AIPG Section Leadership Award was established by the Executive Committee in 2013 to recognize one or more of our members who have demonstrated a long-term commitment and have been long-term contributors to AIPG at the section level. The deadline for submittal of nominees for the AIPG Section Leadership Award is May 31 of each year.
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AIPG Student Chapter Award — Deadline June 30
AIPG
The purpose of the AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award is to recognize the most outstanding student chapter for their participation in, and contribution to, the AIPG. Submittals are due June 30th and awarded in the fall.
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Reactivated AIPG Student Chapter — Ohio State University
AIPG
The Ohio State University has reactivited. Columbus, Ohio, Founded in 2004 — Chapter Sponsor: Robin Roth, CPG-06240; Faculty Sponsor: Karen L. Royce. Officers for 2014: President: Alyssa Ferraro, SA-05377; Vice President: Andrew Collins, SA-04402; and Treasurer: Brian Vargo, SA-05378. Welcome back!
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Call for abstracts: 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference
AIPG
Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists and the Arizona Hydrological Society for the 2014 Water and Rocks, the Foundations of Life National Conference in Prescott, Ariz. Click here to submit an abstract online to be considered for a presentation or poster. Click here for conference details.
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AIPG new applicants and members listing
AIPG
January 25-March 31, 2014
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AIPG section newsletters now available online
AIPG

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2 new store items available: Tall cafe mug and steel travel mug
AIPG
This tall 16 oz. cobalt blue cafe mug has a glossy finished exterior with an easy to hold handle. It is safe in the microwave and features the AIPG logo in microwavable metallic gold. AIPG Member Price is $15.50 (includes shipping in U.S.) Click here to order online.

AIPG now offers this 18-ounce stainless steel travel mug, with blue color grip and slider spill-proof lid mechanism. The price is $14 for AIPG members (includes shipping). Click here to order online.

    

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
May 18-21 GSA Meeting, Bozeman, Mont. For more information, call 303-412-6205 or email aipg@aipg.org
May 29 Aquifer Characterization — Groundwater Behavior in the Subsurface Environment, Lexington, Ky. Hosted by the AIPG Kentucky Section
June 1-4 48th U.S. Rock Mechanics Geomechanics Symposium: Rock Mechanics across Length and Time Scales, Minneapolis . ARMA
June 17-18 4th Annual Workshop on: The Groundwater/Surface Water Interface — Characterization, Evaluation and Compliance, Roscommon, Mich. Hosted by the AIPG Michigan Section
June 25-26 15th Annual Energy Exposition and Symposium, Billings, Mont. The Energy Exposition
Aug. 25-27 2014 Unconventional Resources Technology Conference, Denver URTeC
Aug. 28-Sept. 7 AWG 2014 Canadian Rockies Geology Field Trip, out of Calgary, Alberta, Canada Register here; contact Debbie Hanneman for more information
Sept. 13-16 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference Water & Rocks — the Foundations of Life, Prescott, Ariz. Register online
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section



FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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250 million-year-old piece of Africa found in Southeastern US
International Business Times
Continental breakups are proving to be just as destructive as some human separations. Geologists say they have found a fragment of Africa embedded in the southeastern U.S., a remnant of the rift that occurred between the two continents some 250 million years ago.

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Atom probe assisted dating of oldest piece of earth
Univeristy of Wisconsin-Madison via Phys.org
It's a scientific axiom: big claims require extra-solid evidence. So there were skeptics in 2001 when University of Wisconsin-Madison geoscience professor John Valley dated an ancient crystal found in Australia to 4.4 billion years ago. The date, after all, was only 100 million years after Earth started to solidify from a ball of molten rock.

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Ancient landscape is found under 2 miles of ice in Greenland
NPR
In a surprising discovery, scientists have found evidence of a tundra landscape in Greenland that's millions of years old. The revelation goes against widely held ideas about how some glaciers work, and it suggests that at least parts of Greenland's ice sheet had survived periods of global warming intact.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Earth's oldest and biggest crater yields new secrets
LiveScience
Geologists say they've discovered rocks long thought vanished, the youngest remains of the oldest and biggest impact crater on Earth. In the abraded heart of South Africa's Vredefort impact crater lurk striking green-black rocks, some of the only remnants of a magma sea that once filled the gaping crater, according to a study. Until now, geologists thought nearly all of these "impact melt" rocks were lost to time.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Craters.




Floating islands of rock tracked in Pacific
LiveScience
A computer model could help track rafts of floating rock in the ocean, perhaps giving scientists a way to warn ship captains to stay away. The rock in question is pumice, which forms from rapidly cooled lava. The lava cools so quickly that gas bubbles are trapped inside, creating a rock filled with spongelike holes. Pumice is so light it can float. Islands or undersea volcanoes can create massive amounts of pumice in a single eruption, resulting in huge rafts of rock that can float hundreds of miles.
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Mining week to focus on future of mining sector
Northern Life
For the second year, Sudbury, Canada's annual mining week will take a forward-looking approach to promote opportunities in the sector and dispel myths about the mining industry. Lori Martin, chair of Modern Mining and Technology Sudbury, which organizes the annual event, said younger students in particular, have long had the impression that mining is "very rough and rugged." But Martin said the industry includes much more than underground work.
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  Remediation Injection...we do that!

A site investigation or injection / remediation project requires safe & effective implementation. Geo Lab has the tools, capabilities & experience to do that. Click here for more...
 


Researcher uses floating lab to decipher clues on regeneration
The Associated Press via The Prince George Citizen
Leonid Moroz is attempting to decode the genomic blueprints of marine life — like the comb jellis that can quickly regrow if they are cut and even regenerate rudimentary brains — so he can learn how they regenerate. He uses a special steel shipping container for his lab.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Groundwater Monitoring Equipment & Supplies

Waterra has been providing customers with Simple Solutions for Groundwater Monitoring since 1985. Our product line has grown considerably to include pumps, filters, water level and hydrocarbon detection equipment, water quality testing equipment, bailers and other accessories. Waterra products are designed with the goal of making your life easier in the field.
 


Search for shipwrecks without leaving Central Texas
KEYE-TV
About 200 miles east of Galveston, Texas, and more than a mile below the surface, researchers are uncovering bits and pieces of tall ships that once sailed the Gulf of Mexico. But not everyone in this mission is out on the water. Researchers at Texas State University in San Marcos are connected live to the control center on the ship and others are at home monitoring the shipwreck search online. There's a team of scientists involved in these missions. That's because when you're exploring the sea bottom for ship wrecks you're also bound to come across something biologists or geologists would be interested in.
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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

gtech.mst.edu
 


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Ancient asteroid strike was more insane than we realized (io9)
Atom probe assisted dating of oldest piece of earth (University of Wisconsin-Madison via Phys.org)
Geologists examine historic War of 1812 earthen forts for erosion clues (UDaily)
Watch this terrifying recreation of the deadly Oso mudslide (io9)
Scientists find 'easy' way to extract rare earths from seafloor (Mining.com)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Rhode Island nitrogen cycle differs in bay and sound
Brown University via Phys.org
A new study reports that anammox, a key process in the nitrogen cycle, is barely present in Rhode Island's Narragansett Bay even though it's a major factor just a little farther out into Rhode Island Sound. Scientists traced that to differences between bay and sound sediments, but that raises new questions about what's going on in the Bay to account for those.
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