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Scientists: Newly identified 'Hellboy' dinosaur sported unique horns
NPR
There's a new species of dinosaur, and they call him "Hellboy." At first glance, the untrained eye is likely to see the childhood favorite Triceratops — and to be sure, Regaliceratops peterhewsi is a close relative. But there are some important differences, scientists say.
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Geologists: Artificial Grand Canyon floods are bringing back Colorado River sandbars
The Salt Lake Tribune
Grand Canyon's sandbars are returning. After three straight years of experimental controlled floods unleashed to push sediments down the Colorado River, the U.S. Geological Survey released a report declaring the seasonal gushers a success.
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Researchers discover deepest high-temperature hydrothermal vents in Pacific Ocean
Phys.org
In spring 2015, MBARI researchers discovered a large, previously unknown field of hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California, about 150 kilometers (100 miles) east of La Paz, Mexico. Lying more than 3,800 meters (12,500 feet) below the surface, the Pescadero Basin vents are the deepest high-temperature hydrothermal vents ever observed in or around the Pacific Ocean. They are also the only vents in the Pacific known to emit superheated fluids rich in both carbonate minerals and hydrocarbons.
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AIPG NEWS



AIPG 52nd Annual Conference: Registration is open
AIPG
Registration is now open for AIPG's 52nd Annual Conference, "Fire & Ice," Sept. 19-22, in Anchorage, Alaska. Register online or use the registration form. Click here for meeting details. Submit your abstract online.
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AIPG executive director position announcement
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The position is to be filled as soon as a qualified candidate is vetted. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
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Advertise to over 15,000
AIPG
Showcase your company! Sign up for a one-year business card-size ad in AIPG's The Professional Geologist publication (four quarterly issues). The TPG Professional Services Directory lists companies with experience and expertise in all phases of geology and is distributed to over 15,000 in the geosciences around the globe. TPG is printed, placed online and emailed. The journal is made available at all the conferences that AIPG hosts and attends. For only $400 (AIPG members) and $500 (nonmembers) it is a great deal!
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AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award — Submittal deadline is June 30
AIPG
The purpose of the AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award is to recognize the most outstanding student chapter for their participation in, and contribution to, the American Institute of Professional Geologists. The award will consist of a plaque to be presented to the student chapter, a certificate to each of the officers of the chapter at the time of their submittal, a $500 award for the chapter and a trip for one member of the winning student chapter to the annual AIPG conference and executive meetings. The student that attends the annual meeting will observe the organization and functions of AIPG and participate in the executive board meeting.
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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
June 16-17 5th Annual AIPG Michigan Section Technical Workshop — Site Characterization Roscommon County, Michigan
June 24-25 2015 Energy Exposition
Billings, Montana
Sept. 19-22 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section
Sept. 29-30 AIPG Georgia Section: "Innovative Environmental Assessment of Remediation Technology Kennesaw, Georgia
Sept. 9-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


FROM THE AIPG ONLINE STORE


AIPG lapel pin
AIPG
The AIPG lapel pin is two tone blue and measures three-quarters of an inch in diameter.


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AIPG travel mug available
AIPG
Check out our 16-ounce travel mug. Get exclusive double-wall insulation that keeps the "hots" hot and the "colds" cold. Discover the comfortable handle with thumb grip and spill-resistant lid with thumb-slide opening that makes this mug so popular.


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AIPG short-sleeve T-shirts
AIPG
The men's Hanes adult beefy-T is preshrunk to keep its shape and crafted from 6.1 oz., 100 percent ring-spun cotton for a soft hand with excellent durability. Embroidered AIPG lettering with pick and gavel. Many colors and sizes are available.


The ladies' short sleeve T-shirt is created with a high 40-singles yarn count, this fine knit fabric is ultra-light and unbelievably smooth. Add to that modern styling and a fitted cut, and you get a truly fashionable tee that's a wonderful canvas for an embroidered AIPG logo. Lightweight 3.69-ounce, 100 percent ring spun combed cotton; 40-singles. Preshrunk and colorfast to look great wash after wash. Fine knit softness, with a slimmer cut through the body and sleeves. Available in a variety of colors. Available sizes: Small-4XLarge.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Scientists detect plasma tubes in Earth's magnetosphere
Sci-News.com
Scientists using the Murchison Widefield Array in the Western Australian desert have confirmed the existence of tubular plasma structures between the plasmasphere and ionosphere of our planet, approximately 370 miles (600 km) above the ground.
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Mystery of disappearing lakes in Greenland solved
Tech Times
VideoBrief Disappearing lakes in Greenland have long been a mystery to geologists and other researchers working to understand the strange glacial lakes. Now, a team of investigators believe they have solved the riddle behind this bizarre geological behavior.
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Laser map of Oso, Washington, could help identify other high-risk slopes
Emergency Management
An aerial map compiled a year before the deadly Oso, Washington, landslide shows that the upper portion of the hillside was being dangerously undercut, which could point the way to identifying other high-risk slopes, according to a new analysis. University of Illinois engineering professor Timothy Stark says he and his colleagues are convinced that the slide originated high on the slope, not lower down as previous investigations suggested.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    New USGS map locates hydraulic fracturing sand sources and production in the US (Sierra Sun Times)
Review: San Andreas — the movie (Arizona Geology Magazine)
New technique harnesses everyday seismic waves to image the Earth (Phys.org)
AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist is now available online (AIPG)
Continental collision could trigger California tsunami (Live Science)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Hyperion: Close-up of Saturn's moon
Sky & Telescope
Hyperion is one of our solar system's most intriguing objects. One reason is its unusually low density. Although it's the largest of Saturn's potato-shaped moons, with an average diameter of 270 km (170 miles, less than a tenth our Moon's size), it has a density about half that of water. Due to this low density, and the high reflectivity of its craters' sides, planetary geologists surmise that the moon is made largely of water ice.
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Glaciers on ice — for now
Science News for Students
Earth's next big chill may be on hold. Earth should be nearing another frosty period — with a year-to-year expansion of polar and mountaintop ice. But that is not happening. And the reason seems to be a growing buildup of chemicals that warm the atmosphere, the so-called greenhouse gases. Chief among them: carbon dioxide.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Glaciers.


Archaeologists discover Plymouth's rivers used to be full of gold
The Plymouth Herald
Archaeologists have unearthed what they say was a Bronze Age gold rush to the Plymouth area of Devon, England. Analysis of Western Europe's stunning gold artefacts suggests Cornwall was the scene of a prehistoric gold rush. The West Devon area was also packed full of gold, experts now believe.
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How the Rockies prepared mammals for the cold
redOrbit
Nearly 34 million years ago, European mammals were wiped out en masse due to plummeting temperatures during an event known as the Grande Coupure, yet at this same time, their North American counterparts were largely unfazed. Why? A team of researchers from the Senckenberg Research Institutes in Germany, the University of Helsinki in Finland and Brown University in Rhode Island found the reason for this phenomenon — the rise of the Rocky Mountains.
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