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USGS' South Bay 'rock warehouse' finally gets organized
Contra Costa Times
Hidden behind drab doors in a valley that celebrates all that is new, bright and beautiful is a scientific treasure: proof of what the Earth is made of, how it became what it is — and where it might be going. This is the U.S. Geological Survey's cavernous "rock warehouse," beloved by scientists but unknown to the rest of us.
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520-million-year-old fossil of extinct crustacean discovered in Western Spain
Fox News Latino
A paleontological expedition from several Spanish universities to the La Rinconada de la Sierra area, near the Western Spanish city of Salamanca, has found what could be the oldest trilobite fossil so far unearthed. The 520-million-year-old fossil of the ancient undersea crustacean was found thanks to the work of several geologists, including paleontologist Eladio Griñan, of the University of Zaragoza, and Rodolfo Gozalo, a geology professor at the University of Valancia, who explained the relevance of the discovery.
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Earth's mysteriously light core brims with sulphur
The Huffington Post
New research from the European Association of Geochemistry indicates that the Earth's core contains large deposits of sulphur, estimated to be upwards of 8.5 x 1,018 tons. Published in the Geochemical Perspectives Letters in June 2015, this estimation far surpasses the current amount of sulphur on the Earth's surface and based on recent estimations, is around 10 percent of the moon's mass.
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AIPG NEWS



AIPG 52nd Annual Conference: Registration is open
AIPG
Registration is now open for AIPG's 52nd Annual Conference, "Fire & Ice," Sept. 19-22, in Anchorage, Alaska. Register online or use the registration form. Click here for meeting details. Submit your abstract online.
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AIPG executive director position announcement
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The position is to be filled as soon as a qualified candidate is vetted. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
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AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist is now available online
AIPG
The AIPG quarterly journal, The Professional Geologist, April/May/June 2015, includes AIPG Alaska National Conference information and AIPG 2016-17 National Executive Committee Officer ballot information and ballot enclosed, plus much more!
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Advertise to more than 15,000
AIPG
Showcase your company! Sign up for a one-year business card-size ad in AIPG's The Professional Geologist publication (four quarterly issues). The TPG Professional Services Directory lists companies with experience and expertise in all phases of geology and is distributed to more than 15,000 in the geosciences around the globe. TPG is printed, placed online and emailed. The journal is made available at all the conferences that AIPG hosts and attends. For only $400 (AIPG members) and $500 (nonmembers) it is a great deal!
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AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award — Submittal deadline is today, June 30
AIPG
The purpose of the AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award is to recognize the most outstanding student chapter for their participation in, and contribution to, the American Institute of Professional Geologists. The award will consist of a plaque to be presented to the student chapter, a certificate to each of the officers of the chapter at the time of their submittal, a $500 award for the chapter and a trip for one member of the winning student chapter to the annual AIPG conference and executive meetings. The student that attends the annual meeting will observe the organization and functions of AIPG and participate in the executive board meeting.
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FROM THE AIPG ONLINE STORE


AIPG T-shirts available
AIPG
White T-shirt with AIPG logo on front and "You Might be a Geologist if ... There are More Rocks in Your House than in Your Driveway" on back. Available Color: white. Available sizes: Small-2XLarge.



White T-shirt with AIPG logo on the front and "Geologists are Gneiss, Tuff and a Little Wacke" the on back. Available sizes: Small-2XLarge. (An additional $1.50 will be added for 2XL.) The AIPG member price is $23. (Price includes shipping.)


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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
July 18 AIPG TN Section Field Trip
Dover, Tennessee
Sept. 19-22 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section
Sept. 29-30 AIPG Georgia Section: "Innovative Environmental Assessment of Remediation Technology Kennesaw, Georgia
Sept. 9-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


INDUSTRY NEWS


Swirling vortex is draining Lake Texoma on Texas-Oklahoma border
The Weather Channel
VideoBrief A giant swirling vortex is draining Lake Texoma like a bathtub after the Army Corps of Engineers took steps recently to lower water levels on the Texas-Oklahoma border reservoir. Lake Texoma reached historic levels after record-breaking rains saturated the region in the past weeks and caused flooding and destruction. When authorities lowered water levels by opening floodgates, the massive vortex formed.
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Earth's colossal crater count complete
American Association for the Advancement of Science
Mars is pocked with more than 300,000 craters, created by asteroid impacts. The moon is blanketed with millions more, too many to count. But the surface of Earth, constantly eroded by wind and rain, hides its history. Just 128 confirmed impact craters have been spotted on Earth's surface. However, a new study suggests that this low number is not the result of lazy searching; all of the big impact craters on the planet's surface have been found, leaving none to be discovered.
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Geoscience BC announces new SeArch project
Marketwired via Geology for Investors
Geoscience BC recently announced the launch of a new multiyear minerals project in British Columbia's west-central region. Named "SeArch" to highlight the region's unique geology — an area arching two of the province's mineral-rich geological terrains — this project will gather new, high-resolution data that will help geologists and land-users alike gain a better understanding of the ground beneath their feet.
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Kepler Mission 'discovers 33 stars more than 11 billion years old with Earth-like planets'
The Daily Galaxy
Stars pulsate, vibrate and resonate just like sound waves in a musical instrument. The advanced technique of measuring these starry tunes is called asteroseismology — a method quite similar to the one used by geologists to sound out the composition of the interior of the Earth by means of earthquakes.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    El Niño is officially back, and looks stronger than ever (The Oregonian)
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Blue lights over Kinabalu have geologic explanation (Free Malaysia Today)
Everest shifted in Nepal earthquake, remains same height (National Geographic)
Snowpack in Rockies melts 4 to 6 weeks earlier than normal (Calgary Herald)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Scientists look for clues in Kilauea lava to improve projections about future eruptions
The Associated Press via The Republic
Geologists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory are studying lava samples that might help fine-tune projections if Kilauea sends another 2,000-degree river of molten rock toward homes in lower Puna. The lava flow saw its one-year anniversary on June 27 but hasn't threatened populated areas since March. Geologist Frank Trusdell is nevertheless analyzing thousands of slides and counting crystals one by one.
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Researchers: World's aquifers losing replenishment race
The New York Times
From the Arabian Peninsula to northern India to California's Central Valley, nearly a third of the world's 37 largest aquifers are being drained faster than they are being replenished, according to a recent study led by scientists at the University of California, Irvine. The aquifers are concentrated in food-producing regions that support up to two billion people. A companion study indicates that the total amount of water in the aquifers, and how long it will last at current depletion rates, is still uncertain.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Aquifers.


Geosciences students win 2nd place in international oil prospect competition
Penn State University
A team of five Penn State students won second place and $10,000 in the highly competitive, international Imperial Barrel Award program, hosted by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists and the AAPG Foundation. More than 1,000 students from 132 teams, representing 36 countries, competed.
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7-year study indicates steady and upward trends for blue and fin whales in Southern California
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
A new study led by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego indicates a steady population trend for blue whales and an upward population trend for fin whales in Southern California. Researchers intermittently deployed 16 High-frequency Acoustic Recording Package — devices that sit on the seafloor with a suspended hydrophone — to collect acoustic data on whales off Southern California from 2006-2012.
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