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US Geological Survey searching for rare elements to fuel cellphones
Daily Gadgetry
During America's Gold rush era, miners searched for gold, silver and copper deposits. But what was too early to know back then, is that what they considered to be worthless and tossed aside in the piles of dirt would one day be valuable for modern technology. It's now believed the piles of dirt and rock from the old miners may be vital ingredients that are resourceful minerals and labeled as rare earth elements on the periodic table.
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Geology matters when it comes to storing carbon
Climate Central
For all the promise of carbon capture and storage to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, the technique faces an uphill battle to becoming widely adopted. That's because like most things, carbon capture and storage (CSS) does not fit well into any one-size-fits-all formula. A recent study looked at three prominent CCS sites to see how they responded to the process, and the results suggest that environmental engineers need to be extra careful when selecting locations for storing the gas securely.
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Big-nosed dinosaur, Nasutoceratops, discovered in Utah
Science Now via The Huffington Post
VideoBriefNasutoceratops, a distant relative of the famed Triceratops, was recently discovered by paleontologists digging in Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. The creature lived about 76 million years ago in a swampy, subtropical region that geologists call Laramidia, which was formed when an inland sea filled the center of North America and divided it into two halves.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG bi-monthly journal
AIPG
The Professional Geologist, July/August 2013 issue, is now available online. All past issues are also available online.
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New! AIPG luggage grips
AIPG
Show off your AIPG membership with this neon foam identifier that wraps around the luggage strap for quick ID on a bustling carousel of bags. This 2"h x 5 5/8"w x 5/8"d gripper also cushions business portfolio handles and stays secure with a Velcro® closure. Available in the following colors: red, blue, neon orange, neon green. The price is $6 for AIPG members and $7.50 for nonmembers. Shipping is included in the cost of the luggage grip. Order online or call the office 303-412-6205.
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Come join us for the AIPG 50th Annual Meeting
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists' 50th Annual Meeting, "Geology Serving Society: Energy Independence, Mineral and Water Resources, and Geologic Education," will be Oct. 23-26, in Broomfield, Colo. This conference is designed to exploit Colorado's unique geologic setting. Ten field trips have been organized — with of one them venturing underground — plus several guest trips and a short course. Register now.
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AIPG silent auction
AIPG
A silent auction to benefit the AIPG Foundation will be held in conjunction with the 2013 Annual Meeting in Broomfield, Colo. Please donate any interesting books, specimens, geological memorabilia, etc. to this auction. Donors will be able to deduct the value of the items they donate and purchasers will be able to deduct their purchases because the AIPG Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Click here for more details or contact the office at 303-412-6205 or aipg@aipg.org.
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AIPG Executive Director search
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists has initiated a search for an Executive Director to succeed the current Director who will retire in 2014. AIPG is a professional geoscience society with a membership of nearly 7,000 and a dedicated staff of seven at its headquarters in Thornton, Colo.
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Antarctic-bound robotic submarine making its maiden voyage at Lake Tahoe
NIU Today
Northern Illinois University's 28-foot-long, 2,200-pound robotic submarine, built for exploration beneath the ice shelf in the Antarctic, is getting its maiden voyage this week in one of the nation's deepest and most celebrated bodies of water — Lake Tahoe.

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Next Mars rover will seek out signs of past life
Scientific American
NASA officials have revealed their vision for what comes after the wildly successful Curiosity rover on Mars. Using Curiosity's design as a starting point, Mars 2020 will be another rover digging around the surface of the red planet. But, this time, the robotic explorer will be searching for signs of past life and packing up samples that, someday, will be returned to Earth for analysis.

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Submerged volcanoes cast doubt on Antarctic glaciation theory
Sci-News.com
The Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), an ocean current flowing clockwise around the entire continent, insulates Antarctica from warmer ocean water to the north, helping maintain the ice sheet. For several decades, scientists have surmised that the onset of a complete ACC played a critical role in the initial glaciation of the continent about 34 million years ago. But researchers have found geologic evidence that casts doubt on this theory.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Scientists study cause of earthquakes in New Madrid Seismic Zone
KFVS-TV
A large chunk of the Heartland is in the New Madrid Seismic Zone, which is responsible for some of the biggest earthquakes in history. Now, scientists are studying the magnetic field of the area to better understand the earthquake hazards in the area. And these scientists are actually taking to the sky to learn what's underground.
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Newly discovered flux in the Earth may solve missing-mantle mystery
MIT News via Space Daily
It's widely thought that the Earth arose from violent origins: Some 4.5 billion years ago, a maelstrom of gas and dust circled in a massive disc around the sun, gathering in rocky clumps to form asteroids. These asteroids, gaining momentum, whirled around a fledgling solar system, repeatedly smashing into each other to create larger bodies of rubble &madsh; the largest of which eventually cooled to form the planets. But to date, scientists have found that, quite literally, something doesn't add up.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Mantle.


River deep, mountain high — Lifecycle of iconic ranges
University World News
An international team of scientists has discovered the reasons behind the lifespan of some of the world's iconic mountain ranges, with interactions between landslides and erosion, caused by rivers, explaining why some mountain ranges exceed their expected lifespan.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Canada's Arctic islands yield new clues in ancient mass extinction (The Province)
Dino-killing asteroid also triggered mind-blowing submarine landslides (Ars Technica)
AIPG Executive Director search (AIPG)
The receding threat from 'peak oil' (BBC News)
USGS flights study New Madrid seismic zone (The Daily Dunklin)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Geosphere presents new studies on the nature and structure of North America and Taiwan
Geological Society of America via Science Codex
Eight new studies add to Geosphere's cache of solid research on the nature and structure of North America. Locations studied: Black Canyon of the Gunnison, Colorado; the northern Cascade Mountains, Washington; the Sierra Nevada batholith; the New Jersey shelf; the Appalachian Basin of northwestern Alabama; the Sierra Nevada microplate (Walker Lane rift); and the West Tahoe-Dollar Point fault. A ninth study covers erosion and crustal deformation in central Taiwan.
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An exceedingly rare event might help explain the genesis of gold
Resource Clips
It happened some 3.9 billion light years away, lasted less than one-fifth of a second and created gold worth about $10 octillion. Even more significant, the June 3 gamma ray burst might have provided the "smoking gun" to support a theory about gold's cosmic origins. Some believe the gamma ray burst supports a 20-year-old theory that gold results from collisions of neutron stars, not from supernovae. Although the collisions happen only about once every 10,000 to 100,000 years, they could account for all the gold in the universe.
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Construction of deep-water platforms surges
Fuel Fix
The giants are visible from more than 20 miles away, rising like monuments from the shores of the Gulf of Mexico. They are oil platforms under construction. The facilities are a direct response to technological breakthroughs that are allowing geologists and engineers to find and reach large oil reserves in previously mysterious regions deep under water and deeper under rock.
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