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19,000 years ago, Arctic sea ice influenced force of the Gulf Stream
Science 2.0
Researchers have succeeded in reconstructing the sea ice conditions in the Fram Strait for this critical period at the end of the last glacial and thus in finding a direct connection between changes in sea ice cover and fluctuations in the Gulf Stream. A 9-meter-long sediment core served as a window into the past for the geologists. It was drilled on a Fram Strait expedition conducted on the research vessel Maria. S. Merian and has such clearly defined layers that the scientists can read it like a book.
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Iceland's Bárðarbunga volcano is still rumbling — but not yet erupting
Vox
For the past week, geologists have been watching Iceland's massive Bárðarbunga volcano closely. There have been thousands of earthquakes in the area, a sign that magma may be on the move. So far, there have been no actual eruptions. But given that an eruption has the potential to spew plenty of ash into the atmosphere and disrupt flights across the northern Atlantic, Iceland is still on high alert.
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Daan River gorge is living its life on fast-forward
Smithsonian.com
Erosion generally isn't a particularly quick force of nature. It can take millions of years to level mountains into hills or carve canyons into the earth's surface. But in one place in Taiwan, geologists have had the chance to witness the surprisingly quick formation and ongoing destruction of a river gorge, which is leading to new insights on a very old force of nature.
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2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference
AIPG
The 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference is only three weeks away. Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists and the Arizona Hydrological Society Sept. 13-16 for the 2014 Water and Rocks, the Foundations of Life National Conference in Prescott, Arizona. Contact hours will be available for attending technical sessions and technical field trips. Rooms are sold out at PRCC. Our overflow hotel is the Hampton Inn, 3453 Ranch Drive, in Prescott, Arizona. The contact number is 926-443-5500.
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AIPG new applicants and members (April-August 2014)
AIPG
Here is a listing of AIPG new applicants and members during the period from April 1 to Aug. 7.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  ENVIRONMENTAL AND GEOTECHNICAL DRILLING

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The University of Kentucky is now accepting applications for the Director of the Kentucky Geological Survey and the 13th State Geologist of Kentucky.
University of Kentucky
For more information about the position and KGS, please click the "Read More" link. This webpage contains a link to the UK employment application for the position.
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GSA has an opening for the position of Executive Director
Geological Society of America
If you would like to apply for this position, please provide the following documents: resume, the names, addresses and email addresses of three references, and a letter describing your interest in the position. The individual may send their information as attachments to hr@geosociety.org. Click the "Read More" link for more information.
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AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver
AIPG
The term "Social License to Operate" (SLO) was originally adopted for use by the Canadian mining industry in the late 1990s, and referred to the concept that social permission was needed for a mining company to conduct its operations, for example from local communities or indigenous people. Since then, the premise of the SLO has been extended to other geological challenges faced by society, such as fracking for oil and gas development, radioactive waste disposal, carbon capture and storage, geologic hazards, and deep-well injection of wastewater.

The lay public is frequently uninformed or misinformed about the complex scientific and technical challenges that accompany these issues. This problem is typically coupled with a general lack of knowledge about subsurface geology. The SLO seeks to alleviate this problem through a variety of public participation strategies to engage with citizens, communities, and stakeholder groups. Through this process, geoscientists can develop an understanding of public knowledge and concerns.

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2014 AGU Fall Meeting
American Geophysical Union
The AGU Fall Meeting is largest gathering of Earth and space sciences in the world. With nearly 24,000 attendees, this meeting is the best place to get valuable feedback about your science, network with both up-and-coming talent and luminaries in your field, and learn about cutting-edge research tools.

AGU galvanizes a community of Earth and space scientists that collaboratively advances and communicates science and its power to ensure a sustainable future.

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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

gtech.mst.edu
 


Contemporary Geoscientists of China: Yin-fo CHANG
GT & Associates
Yin-fo CHANG is an academician of both the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Engineering which makes him a rarity among academicians. There are only about 30 academicians with these twin honors. Mr. CHANG is a practical geologist, most of his scientific contribution comes from his practical experience, from the data of field investigations. His success would be concluded in three main fields.
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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Aug. 25-27 2014 Unconventional Resources Technology Conference, Denver URTeC
Aug. 28-Sept. 7 AWG 2014 Canadian Rockies Geology Field Trip, out of Calgary, Alberta, Canada Register here; contact Debbie Hanneman for more information
Sept. 13-16 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference Water & Rocks — the Foundations of Life, Prescott, Arizona Register online
Sept. 15 The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists Silent Auction at the AIPG annual meeting awards dinner Complete the form
Nov. 10 AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver Register Online
Dec. 15-19 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco AGU
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section



FEATURED ARTICLE
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Natural methane seepage on US Atlantic Ocean margin widespread
USGS and Mississippi State University
Natural methane leakage from the seafloor is far more widespread on the U.S. Atlantic margin than previously thought, according to a study by researchers from Mississippi State University, the U.S. Geological Survey, and other institutions. Methane plumes identified in the water column between Cape Hatteras, North Carolina and Georges Bank, Massachusetts, are emanating from at least 570 seafloor cold seeps on the outer continental shelf and the continental slope.

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Rainwater's seismic potential runs deep
Financial Times
Rainwater can penetrate many kilometers deep into the earth — further than geologists had realized. Researchers from Southampton University, working with colleagues in New Zealand, have found evidence of fluids derived originally from rainfall below the "ductile crust," where high temperatures and pressures cause rocks to flex and flow rather than fracture in response to tectonic movements. The discovery has implications for understanding earthquakes.

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Scientists develop tractor beam for water
KTUU-TV
A group of physicists at the Australian National University have created a water tractor beam, allowing them to control and manipulate objects floating in water. Simple wave generators enabled the group to control water flow patterns, which in turn allowed them to move floating objects in whichever direction they chose. Application of the discovery could affect environmental studies and oil spill recovery.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


South Napa earthquake: Which fault is at fault?
Scientific American
Napa, California and the surrounding communities definitely wanted an answer when a magnitude 6.0 struck, jarring folks severely at 3:20 in the morning Pacific time. USGS says the shaking only lasted about 10-20 seconds, depending on how far you were from the epicenter. Instruments at UC Berkeley and the USGS in Menlo Park were able to find the epicenter and focus right quick, down to the tenth of a mile. But the scientists are still trying to determine which fault is at fault.
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Giant unexplained crack appears in earth in Mexico
Nine News
VideoBrief A giant crack that parted remote farmland in Mexico has left scientists and locals baffled. Drone video shows the sheer size of the 8-meter-deep and almost 1-kilometer-long trench, which opened up across Hermosillo's Highway 26 last week in the country's north. Geological investigators are now looking into what caused the crevice.
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Mastodon fossils found in Ohio
Mansfield News Journal
VideoBrief Ten students from Ashland University and five archeology students from The College of Wooster, along with several volunteers, spent Aug. 23 in the middle of a soybean field in Morrow County, Ohio, on a mastodon excavation. The tusked beasts lived during the Ice Age, at least 10,000 years ago. Nigel Brush, associate professor of geology at Ashland University, said bits of bone and tusk fragments were found last year by a farmer during the excavation of a drainage ditch.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Fossils.


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Monterey proves more complex than average shale play (Oil & Gas Journal)
Research from 1960s shakes up understanding of West Coast earthquakes (University of Washington)
A simple mineral has geochemical power that helps spark life (KQED)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Iceland: Raw, rugged and a warm-up for Mars
National Geographic
Bethany Ehlmann is touring with students in Iceland to learn more about the dynamic geological processes that mold and carve our planet in order to gain insight on other planets, particularly Mars. The research that she and her students conduct can tell us more about how other planets work, how they might host life, and how we might one day colonize them.
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Study: California mountains are rising due to drought
Tech Times
California mountains are rising, by a small amount, due to the extreme drought taking place in the Western United States, according to a new study. University of California San Diego researchers, working in the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the school, discovered landmasses in the Western United States are rising.
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The Caribbean goes geothermal
Ozy.com via USA Today
Forget the white-sand beaches and astonishing biodiversity. The Caribbean's real treasure might be buried deep, deep underground, in the form of steam and piping-hot water — in other words, geothermal energy. In recent years, the Antilles, lesser and greater, has emerged as a hub for geothermal energy exploration. The stakes are high. If the region can harness the power of its heat a nearly endless supply of energy could reward it.
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