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Mystery of Death Valley's moving rocks solved
The Associated Press via WSPA-TV
For years scientists have theorized about how large rocks — some weighing hundreds of pounds — zigzag across Racetrack Playa in Death Valley National Park, leaving long trails etched in the earth. Now two researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, have photographed these "sailing rocks" being blown by light winds across the former lake bed.
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Scientists scramble to map previously unknown fault that caused Napa quake
Mashable
The recent 6.0 magnitude earthquake in Napa, California, was a jolt from the blue, involving previously unknown active fault lines as well as faults that were thought to be inactive. The quake caused widespread damage that may total several billion dollars, and scientists say it revealed new movement in 1.6 million-year-old faults.
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Deep mission: Japan takes aim at the source of megaquakes
The Seattle Times
The Japanese government spent more than $500  million to build the research vessel Chikyu — which is longer than two football fields — with one goal in mind: to decipher the inner workings of a fault capable of unleashing a disaster far worse than the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. In 2016, Japan hopes to complete a nine-year mission to drill into the heart of the Nankai Trough, a 500-mile-long fault that threatens some of the country's most populous areas.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now available to pay online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2015 in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to log in to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists will hold a silent auction at the AIPG annual meeting awards dinner and social function at 6 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 15, at the Prescott Resort and Conference Center. Winning bids will be determined at the end of the evening dinner function, at about 8:30 pm. We hope you will consider a donation to the silent auction to raise funds in support of the Foundation for AIPG programs, scholarships, internships and various initiatives. Please complete the form with information about your donations (such as mineral/rock specimens, books, antiques or historic items, artwork, jewelry, maps, stay at a vacation home and other things geologic).

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AIPG Quarterly Journal
AIPG
The Professional Geologist July/August/September issue is now available online. All past issues are also available online.
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2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference
AIPG
The 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference is only two weeks away. Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists and the Arizona Hydrological Society Sept. 13-16 for the 2014 Water and Rocks, the Foundations of Life National Conference in Prescott, Arizona. Contact hours will be available for attending technical sessions and technical field trips. Rooms are sold out at PRCC. Our overflow hotel is the Hampton Inn, 3453 Ranch Drive, in Prescott, Arizona. The contact number is 926-443-5500.
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AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver
AIPG
The term "Social License to Operate" (SLO) was originally adopted for use by the Canadian mining industry in the late 1990s, and referred to the concept that social permission was needed for a mining company to conduct its operations, for example from local communities or indigenous people. Since then, the premise of the SLO has been extended to other geological challenges faced by society, such as fracking for oil and gas development, radioactive waste disposal, carbon capture and storage, geologic hazards, and deep-well injection of wastewater.

The lay public is frequently uninformed or misinformed about the complex scientific and technical challenges that accompany these issues. This problem is typically coupled with a general lack of knowledge about subsurface geology. The SLO seeks to alleviate this problem through a variety of public participation strategies to engage with citizens, communities, and stakeholder groups. Through this process, geoscientists can develop an understanding of public knowledge and concerns.

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2014 AIPG Student Scholarship winners announced
AIPG
The AIPG Executive Committee is pleased to announce the awardees for the 2014 Student Scholarships. AIPG has awarded eleven scholarships this year. The recipients are Dana Walters, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina; Kara Mjolhus, West Texas A&M, Canyon, Texas; Zakia Kiminta, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia; Firdaus Ridzuan, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa; Colin Sturrock, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; Nicolas Spano, University of Minnesota- Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota; Ryan Phillip, West Georgia University; Carrollton, Georgia; Alexandra Price, Colorado Mesa University, Grand Junction, Colorado; Ashley Pales, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois; Jessica Badgeley, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colorado; and Carly Siko, Michigan Tech University, Houghton, Michigan. Click here to read the student essays.
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AIPG new applicants and members (April-August 2014)
AIPG
Here is a listing of AIPG new applicants and members during the period from April 1 to Aug. 7.
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AIPG polar fleece full zip jacket
AIPG
This exceptionally soft fleece jacket will keep you warm during everyday excursions and it's offered at an unbeatable price. It has a double collar, 1-inch double needle elastic waist and cuffs, taped contrast collar, two zippered front pockets, yolk front and double needle half-moon sweat patch. It includes an embroidered AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold. Available in a variety of colors.

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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

gtech.mst.edu
 


Contemporary Geoscientists of China: De-zi WANG
GT & Associates
De-zi WANG is a petrologist in the field of granite and volcanic rocks. He was the first in China to raise the concept of "subvolcanic granitoids," which concerns the intrusion of subvolcanic granitoids into complex rock considering from time, space and source of materials; He found the first S type volcanic rock in China and classified it into water rich, water deficient and fluorine rich associations, which provide new concept for the formation of these kind of rocks.
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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Aug. 28-Sept. 7 AWG 2014 Canadian Rockies Geology Field Trip, out of Calgary, Alberta, Canada Register here; contact Debbie Hanneman for more information
Sept. 13-16 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference Water & Rocks — the Foundations of Life, Prescott, Arizona Register online
Sept. 15 The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists Silent Auction at the AIPG annual meeting awards dinner Complete the form
Nov. 10 AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver Register Online
Dec. 15-19 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco AGU
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section



FEATURED ARTICLE
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Unitization: The oil and gas industry's solution to one of geology's many conundrums
The National Law Review
Geology, and nature in general, are never perfect. Given the migratory nature of oil and gas, a hydrocarbon reservoir will often straddle two or more license or contract areas. One of the primary objectives of host governments and international oil companies is to maximize the economic recovery of petroleum from the "common" hydrocarbon reservoir. Unitisation is an approach, which the oil and gas industry has developed to ensure that this is achieved.

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Natural methane seepage on US Atlantic Ocean margin widespread
USGS and Mississippi State University
Natural methane leakage from the seafloor is far more widespread on the U.S. Atlantic margin than previously thought, according to a study by researchers from Mississippi State University, the U.S. Geological Survey, and other institutions. Methane plumes identified in the water column between Cape Hatteras, North Carolina and Georges Bank, Massachusetts, are emanating from at least 570 seafloor cold seeps on the outer continental shelf and the continental slope.

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19,000 years ago, Arctic sea ice influenced force of the Gulf Stream
Science 2.0
Researchers have succeeded in reconstructing the sea ice conditions in the Fram Strait for this critical period at the end of the last glacial and thus in finding a direct connection between changes in sea ice cover and fluctuations in the Gulf Stream. A 9-meter-long sediment core served as a window into the past for the geologists.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Geologists unravel mystery of new crater found in Utah
KSL-TV
VideoBrief Farmers in southern Utah are scratching their heads and trying to figure out what caused an unusual phenomenon in an irrigation pond. Gary Dalton of Circleville recently discovered a mysterious crater that suddenly appeared under the water. Just beneath the surface he saw concentric circles in the pond botom with a diameter of about 25 feet. The outer ring is a circular depression filled with algae. An inner circle looks as though something erupted from beneath, forming what looks startlingly like a small volcanic crater.
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Composition of Earth's mantle revised
Science 2.0
The makeup of the Earth's lower mantle, which makes up the largest part of the Earth by volume, is significantly different than previously thought. Though understanding the composition of the mantle is essential to seismology and could shed light on unexplained seismic phenomena observed there, little is actually known. The lack of knowledge is because humans haven't yet managed to drill further than seven and a half miles into the Earth, so geologists rely on calculations and limited observation.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Mantle.


British geologists recreate Great Britain in Minecraft
Tech Times
Minecraft players looking for a little realism in their gaming sessions now have all of Great Britain to explore in the game. The British Geological Survey created an accurate geographical map of over 22 billion Minecraft blocks and is now offering a free download of it to any of the game's active users. The map, which uses data from the Ordnance Survey, contains England, Scotland, Wales and even several islands around Great Britain. If you zoom in to the surface, its detail is eerily accurate.
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Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

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Watch footage of Iceland's latest volcanic eruption
Forbes
VideoBrief Lava started spewing forth the morning of Aug. 31 from the same fissure in between Iceland's Askja and Bardarbunga volcanoes where a smaller eruption was observed a few days earlier. Scientists on site from the University of Cambridge captured this footage from the eruption. The University of Iceland says that the highest fire fountains seen are about 70 meters high. Geologists estimate that this eruption is between 10 and 50 times larger than the earlier one.
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Losing ground: Southeast Louisiana is disappearing, quickly
Scientific American
At the current rates that the sea is rising and land is sinking, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists say by 2100, the Gulf of Mexico could rise as much as 4.3 feet across the landscape, which has an average elevation of about 3 feet. If that happens, everything outside the protective levees — most of Southeast Louisiana — would be underwater.
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OPG: Nuclear waste site is rock solid
The Star
Ontario Power Generation believes it has a rock-solid case for burying nuclear waste at the Bruce nuclear plant near Kincardine. Literally. OPG plans to entomb low- and intermediate-level nuclear waste in a thick layer of limestone 680 meters underground, at the site of the Bruce nuclear plant on the shores of Lake Huron. "The beauty of it is, this rock is 450 million years old," OPG's Jerry Keto said. "This rock is extremely stable. Nothing has happened to this rock in 450 million years." The rock is the envy of other geologists seeking nuclear waste sites, he said.
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