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Hidden superchain of volcanoes discovered in Australia
Live Science
Scientists have just found the world's longest chain of volcanoes on a continent, hiding in plain sight. The newly discovered Australian volcano chain isn't a complete surprise, though: Geologists have long known of small, separate chains of volcanic activity on the island continent. However, new research reveals a hidden hotspot once churned beneath regions with no signs of surface volcanism, connecting these separate strings of volcanoes into one megachain.
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Geologists find new whale species
Radio New Zealand
In the 1990s, Otago geologists found the fossils in the South Island's Waitaki River area, and a study about them has just been published in two science journals. One of the lead researchers, Ewan Fordyce, said the fossils show two previously unknown species of filter-feeding baleen whales that lived 25 to 30 million years ago.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Species.


University of Tasmania researchers discover surprising geological history
The Courier Mail
Breakthrough research led by University of Tasmania geologists has found the island was once a part of what is now the United States West Coast. Jacob Mulder, a Ph.D. student with the Center of Excellence in Ore Deposits said Tasmania split from North America about 1.5 billion years ago.
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AIPG 52nd Annual Conference: Walk-ins welcome
AIPG
AIPG's 52nd Annual Conference, "Fire & Ice," will be held Sept. 19-22, in Anchorage, Alaska. Register online or use the registration form. Reserve your hotel room here or call 1-800-HILTONS. Click here for meeting details. The presentation schedule is online. Walk-ins welcome!
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AIPG members — 2016 membership dues
AIPG
The 2016 membership dues are available to pay online. Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1 in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2016. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on MEMBER LOGIN to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
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AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG
  • The AIPG Georgia Section Newsletter — September 2015
  • The AIPG Michigan Section Newsletter — September 2015
  • The Northeast Section Newsletter — Summer 2015
  • The AIPG Wisconsin Section Newsletter — Fall 2015
  • The AIPG Illinios-Indiana Section Newsletter — Summer 2015
  • The AIPG Ohio Section Newsletter — August 2015
  • The AIPG Texas Section Newsletter — July 2015
  • The AIPG Michigan Section Newsletter — July 2015

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    AIPG executive director position announcement
    AIPG
    The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The position is to be filled as soon as a qualified candidate is vetted. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
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    MARK YOUR CALENDAR

    Date Event More Information
    Sept. 19-22 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section
    Sept. 29-30 AIPG Georgia Section: "Innovative Environmental Assessment of Remediation Technology Kennesaw, Georgia
    Dec. 9 AIPG New England Aquifers: Elusive and Complex Conference Marlborough, Massachusetts
    Dec. 16 AIPG New England Aquifers: Elusive and Complex Conference Glastonbury, Connecticut
    April 5-6, 2016 AIPG Water Resources Unplugged Conference Orlando, Florida
    Sept. 9-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


    FROM THE AIPG ONLINE STORE


    AIPG men's and ladies' cotton long-sleeve T-shirts available
    AIPG
    Hanes® men's Beefy-T® long sleeve T-shirt is crafted from 6.1 oz., 100 percent ring-spun cotton for a soft hand with excellent durability. Comes with embroidered AIPG lettering with pick and gavel.


    Port & Company® ladies' long-sleeve 5.4-oz 100 percent cotton tee.


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    AIPG men's and ladies' Sport-Tek long sleeve T-shirt are available
    AIPG
    The men's Sport-Tek® ultimate performance long-sleeve crew T-shirt combines a soft cotton hand with sweat-wicking performance to make training (or lounging) cooler and drier. Fabric/style: 5-ounce, 95/5 poly/spandex jersey; tag-free label, loose athletic fit and raglan sleeves.
    The Sport-Tek® ladies' long-sleeve V-neck tee is lightweight, roomy and highly breathable, these moisture-wicking, value-priced tees feature PosiCharge technology to lock in color and prevent logos from fading. It is 3.8-ounce, 100 percent polyester interlock with PosiCharge technology, gently contoured silhouette, removable tag for comfort and relabeling, self-fabric V-neck and set-in sleeves.

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    INDUSTRY NEWS


    New evidence suggests oxygen-producing life forms appeared much earlier than previous estimates
    Tech Times
    According to a study published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, oxygen-producing life-forms appeared hundreds of millions of years earlier than was previously estimated. Researchers report that oxygen made its presence felt on Earth for the first time about 3.2 billion years ago based on the discovery of rusty rock layers rich in iron within sediments deposited over shallow ocean floors. Analyzing the rock layers showed that the ancient rust was biological, placing the first oxygen producers some 200 million years earlier than earlier estimates.
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    New, high-res images reveal intricate landscapes, unexpected features on Pluto
    National Geographic
    New images of Pluto, sent back to Earth from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, are unveiling more surprises about the dwarf planet on the fringe of the observable solar system. Released over the last two days, the images are higher resolution than the ones released in July, when the spacecraft flew within 8,000 miles of Pluto's surface. In the new set, landforms such as a chaotic patch of jumbled terrain, linear features resembling wind-sculpted dunes, and oozy nitrogen ice flows are sharp and in-focus.
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      No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
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    Geologists sample Utah fault line to study earthquake risk
    Deseret News
    A team of geologists has dug a 150-foot trench by the Salt Lake City International Airport to study the Taylorsville-West Valley City fault, and its rock samples will help scientists forecast when the next major earthquake could erupt along the Wasatch fault. It's one of about 20 other research trenches being studied along the Wasatch Front to help gauge the havoc a major earthquake could reap in the region, where 80 percent of Utahns live and work.
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    Southern Ocean sinks carbon
    Scientific American
    The oceans near Antarctica that absorb carbon and protect our planet from climate change have been working robustly in the past decade, finds a new study published in Science. The study contradicts earlier inferences that the Southern Ocean's carbon sink has been weak in the 21st century. The earlier studies were based on modeling, while the new study is based on observations.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Scientists want to unravel mysteries behind Britain's 'Atlantis' (Tech Times)
    Denali's digits: North America's tallest peak 'shrinks' by 10 feet (Live Science)
    TES satellite instrument gives new insight into water cycle (Phys.org)
    Hidden oasis of oxygen suggests life took first breath in lakes (New Scientist)
    Geologists say large amount of gold and silver may be hidden near volcanoes (Tech Times)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




    Study looks closer at vulnerability of watersheds in West
    KBSX-FM
    It is common knowledge that the drought this year was pretty bad. But just how intense was it, and what can we learn about it for future water supply shortages? These are some of the questions scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey across the West are asking. They are studying streams and rivers in six states, including Idaho, Oregon and Washington.
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    Spherical wonders: Geologists have a few theories about how concretions formed
    The Columbus Dispatch
    Carbonate concretions are among Ohio's greatest geologic mysteries. They are made of limestone or dolomite and form inside layers of shale, pushing the shale away as they grow. Scientists aren't sure how the concretions formed, though they do have some theories.
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    Students strive for deeper understanding of urban desert meteorology
    Phys.org
    Three Arizona State University engineering and science students are hoping to contribute to knowledge of the complex interplay of energy and water fluxes in our built urban environments. With the support of a grant from the Earth Materials and Processes program of the U.S. Army Research Office, they have deployed a 30-foot metal tower equipped with environmental and meteorological sensors in an irrigated grassy area at ASU's Polytechnic campus in Mesa.
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