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Well water may contain earthquake warning signs
Yahoo News
Spikes in sodium and hydrogen in well water warned of mounting strain before two Iceland earthquakes, geologists say. The new study provides some of the best evidence yet for earthquake precursors. Despite centuries of effort, no one has discovered reliable precursors, which are changes seen before an earthquake. But while seismologists would dearly love to save lives by predicting earthquakes, the well-water evidence is not a first step toward early warnings — it's more like a glimpse of a long, bumpy road.
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A journey to the underwater volcanoes where life may have erupted
Nautilus
It t was nearly midnight aboard the research vessel Atlantis. The ship was about a thousand miles west of Costa Rica, where she'd sailed from, hovering over a hydrothermal vent field in the eastern Pacific. The black smoker may be a window into the eruption of life on Earth. Rutgers microbiologist Costantino Vetriani is part of a team of scientists who have come to the vents to study the microbes that carpet every surface in and around them.
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Finding faults: Scientists close in on Napa quake origins
KQED Public Media
It took less than 20 seconds to shake apart historic buildings and topple chimneys from Vallejo, California, to St. Helena. But throughout the Napa Valley, the Aug. 24 South Napa Earthquake left its calling cards — not just the startling damage in downtown Napa but subtle traces on the ground itself: clues to what actually happened deep below the surface. In fact, geologists now say that the South Napa quake created more surface fractures than any known quake of its size in California. Weeks after the magnitude-6.0 shaker, a new picture is emerging of the complex geology underneath. The quake is literally re-drawing the fault maps and providing valuable clues to the next major seismic event.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG/AHS National Conference photos
AIPG
Photos from the AIPG/AHS National Conference are available online. Those that attended are encouraged and welcome to include their photos. Here are some additional photo links that have been sent in:
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AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  ENVIRONMENTAL AND GEOTECHNICAL DRILLING

Double J Drilling of W.Va.,Inc.is a woman-owned,small business with over 35 years performing drilling and well installation services for Government,Industry,and Consultants throughout the Mid-Atlantic region.

Phone: 304-375-4629             E-Mail: djdray@wirefire.com
 


AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver
AIPG
The term "Social License to Operate" (SLO) was originally adopted for use by the Canadian mining industry in the late 1990s, and referred to the concept that social permission was needed for a mining company to conduct its operations, for example from local communities or indigenous people. Since then, the premise of the SLO has been extended to other geological challenges faced by society, such as fracking for oil and gas development, radioactive waste disposal, carbon capture and storage, geologic hazards, and deep-well injection of wastewater.

The lay public is frequently uninformed or misinformed about the complex scientific and technical challenges that accompany these issues. This problem is typically coupled with a general lack of knowledge about subsurface geology. The SLO seeks to alleviate this problem through a variety of public participation strategies to engage with citizens, communities, and stakeholder groups. Through this process, geoscientists can develop an understanding of public knowledge and concerns.

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AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now available to pay online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2015 in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to log in to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

gtech.mst.edu
 


The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.
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AIPG embroidered beanie cap
AIPG
A warm, stylish accessory constructed from 100 percent acrylic. This beanie comes in a variety of solid colors, or with a contrasting trim, embroidered with the AIPG logo. Available colors: gray, gray/black, black, black/natural, light pink/white, natural/navy, navy, navy/natural.


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AIPG fleece scarf available
AIPG
This fleece scarf provides comfort against the cold breeze. Made of anti-pill polyester, this scarf features a matching whipstitch with an embroidered AIPG logo. Available in black or navy.


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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Nov. 10 AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver Register Online
Dec. 15-19 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco AGU
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section



FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR
Miranda: An icy moon deformed by tidal heating
Geological Society of America via Science Codex
Miranda, a small, icy moon of Uranus, is one of the most visually striking and enigmatic bodies in the solar system. Despite its relatively small size, Miranda appears to have experienced an episode of intense resurfacing that resulted in the formation of at least three remarkable and unique surface features — polygonal-shaped regions called coronae.

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Scientists: Popular theory about volcanoes is all wrong
The Huffington Post
A popular theory has it that, at least in certain types of volcanoes, eruptions occur when molten rock known as magma gushes up from deep inside the earth via narrow jets known as mantle plumes. But a new study of seismic data has identified one very big hole in the theory: "Mantle plumes have never had a sound physical or logical basis," study co-author Dr. Don L. Anderson, professor emeritus of geophysics at Caltech in Pasadena, California, said in a written statement released by the university.

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Early Earth less hellish than previously thought
Vanderbilt University via Science Codex
Conditions on Earth for the first 500 million years after it formed may have been surprisingly similar to the present day, complete with oceans, continents and active crustal plates. This alternate view of Earth's first geologic eon, called the Hadean, has gained substantial new support from the first detailed comparison of zircon crystals that formed more than 4 billion years ago with those formed contemporaneously in Iceland, which has been proposed as a possible geological analog for early Earth.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Forecasting hurricane strength, destruction using new model
Nature World News
Hurricanes are known for their unpredictability and potential for destruction. And while current forecasts are helpful, they are sometimes inaccurate and mislead the public. Now, new research offers a different way to predict hurricane strength and destruction, giving people a better idea of how to prepare for such storms.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Hurricanes.


Snail shells show high-rise plateau is much lower than it used to be
University of Washington
The Tibetan Plateau in south-central Asia, because of its size, elevation and impact on climate, is one of the world's greatest geological oddities. For decades, geologists have debated when and how the plateau reached such lofty heights, some 14,000 feet above sea level. But new research led by a University of Washington scientist appears to confirm an earlier finding that at least one large area of the plateau in southwest Tibet actually lost 3,000 to 5,000 feet of elevation sometime in the Pliocene epoch.
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Great Barrier Reef is an effective wave absorber, even with large gaps
University of Southampton via Science Codex
New research has found that the Great Barrier Reef, as a whole, is a remarkably effective wave absorber, despite large gaps between the reefs. This means that landward of the reefs, waves are mostly related to local winds rather than offshore wave conditions. As waves break and reduce in height over reefs, this drives currents that are very important for the transport of nutrients and larvae. This reduction in wave height also has implications for shoreline stability.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Wrinkles in ancient rock may be signs of early life (ZME Science)
Team develops new, inexpensive method for understanding earthquake topography (Space News From SpaceDaily)
Jupiter's moon Europa just got even cooler (TIME)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Weird earth movement after Japan earthquake finally explained
LiveScience via Yahoo News
Japan's terrifying 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake unleashed about 1,000 years of pent-up pressure that was stored between two colliding tectonic plates. During the Tohoku earthquake, northeast Japan jumped 16 feet (5 meters) eastward — a permanent shift — and the seafloor closer to the fault skipped 101 feet (31 m) to the east, according to GPS data. But immediately afterward, offshore GPS receivers in the extreme damage zone were traveling westward again, a puzzling sight. A new study explains why.
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Iowa researcher using 3-D printing to understand what lies beneath
Oilprice.comNASDAQ
An assistant professor at Iowa State University is using 3-D printing to teach students about geology. In the process, he's been developing a way to understand and even predict how materials trapped in rock — such as oil and gas — can be extracted.
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Supervolcano blast would blanket US in ash
Science News
 A new simulation illustrates the explosiveness of the volcano that lurks beneath Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Around 640,000 years ago, the volcano blew its top and coated North America with roughly 1,000 cubic kilometers of ash, enough to fill Lake Erie twice over. Researchers used simulation software called Ash3d that forecasts ash fall by applying global wind patterns to data from historical eruptions. Ash3d churns out results several times faster than previous simulators and is the first program to incorporate the physics of how ash particles clump within a cloud.
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