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Scientists discover a new origin of oxygen on Earth and in space
Los Angeles Times
Scientists have discovered a new way to make molecular oxygen from carbon dioxide — no green plants involved. Their findings could alter our understanding of the Earth's early atmosphere and how oxygen might form on other planets with carbon dioxide in their atmospheres. In a paper published Oct. 2 in Science, researchers from UC Davis report that when carbon dioxide molecules are exposed to certain wavelengths of light radiation, they can get so excited that they split into a C molecule and an O2 molecule.
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New map exposes previously unseen details of seafloor
Scripps Oceanography News
Accessing two previously untapped streams of satellite data, scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and their colleagues have created a new map of the world's seafloor, creating a much more vivid picture of the structures that make up the deepest, least-explored parts of the ocean. Thousands of previously uncharted mountains rising from the seafloor and new clues about the formation of the continents have emerged through the new map, which is twice as accurate as the previous version produced nearly 20 years ago.
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New species of dinosaur unearthed in Utah earns the name 'Nose King'
KSTU-TV
Scientists recently announced the discovery of a new dinosaur, the remains of which were pulled from an area in central Utah. The creature is named for its unusually large nose, but researchers said it's not clear how the feature benefited the dinosaur. Rodney Scheetz, curator of BYU's Museum of Paleontology, spoke about the creature.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now available to pay online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2015 in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to log in to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205.

Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.

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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

Donate online.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  ENVIRONMENTAL AND GEOTECHNICAL DRILLING

Double J Drilling of W.Va.,Inc.is a woman-owned,small business with over 35 years performing drilling and well installation services for Government,Industry,and Consultants throughout the Mid-Atlantic region.

Phone: 304-375-4629             E-Mail: djdray@wirefire.com
 


AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver
AIPG
The term "Social License to Operate" (SLO) was originally adopted for use by the Canadian mining industry in the late 1990s, and referred to the concept that social permission was needed for a mining company to conduct its operations, for example from local communities or indigenous people. Since then, the premise of the SLO has been extended to other geological challenges faced by society, such as fracking for oil and gas development, radioactive waste disposal, carbon capture and storage, geologic hazards, and deep-well injection of wastewater.

The lay public is frequently uninformed or misinformed about the complex scientific and technical challenges that accompany these issues. This problem is typically coupled with a general lack of knowledge about subsurface geology. The SLO seeks to alleviate this problem through a variety of public participation strategies to engage with citizens, communities, and stakeholder groups. Through this process, geoscientists can develop an understanding of public knowledge and concerns.

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The William J. Siok Graduate Scholarship
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has established in 2014 the William J. Siok Graduate Scholarship. Supporting Advanced Education in the Geosciences and Hydrogeology. Contributions can be made online, mailed or included with your dues.
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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

gtech.mst.edu
 


AIPG Student Mentor Program
AIPG
The AIPG has almost 3,000 student members and mentors are needed. If you are interested in becoming a mentor please login to your online profile and click on the mentor check off box. Students are asked to check off the mentee box if they would like to have a mentor. Mentoring students is one of the most important and lasting contributions that a geologist can make to the profession. If you need assistance email the office at aipg@aipg.org.
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Requesting articles for Student theme issue of The Professional Geologist (TPG) — Jan/Feb/Mar 2015
AIPG
Submit an articles that will assist our student members in knowing what to be prepared for. This information will be placed in the upcoming Jan/Feb/Mar 2015 Student Issue of TPG. Your submittal can be a couple of paragraphs, a letter, an opinion piece, an article on what you are currently working on, photos, student chapter information, etc. Please see the requirements below for submitting an article for TPG. The deadline for submitting an article is Nov. 1.

Instructions to Authors

Articles may be technical or professional in nature. Articles containing news of importance to professional geologists will be considered. Articles should be submitted electronically via email in Word format to Vickie Hill at vlh@aipg.org. Graphics should also be submitted electronically in jpg, tiff, gif, ai, eps, psd or other standard format at 300 dpi.

Order Extra Copies of the Student Issue

The cost of the Student Issue is being discounted from $5 to $4 for quantities of 10 or more. Amount due ($4 x quantity) plus shipping and handling.

Shipping & Handling: Orders up to $15 add $8, orders $15.01-$30 ad $10, orders over $30 add $12. If weight of order exceeds 10 pounds, additional postage will apply. Please forward your order, with payment, to AIPG Headquarters no later than Dec. 1, 2014.

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AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG

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AIPG polar fleece full zip jacket
AIPG
This exceptionally soft fleece jacket will keep you warm during everyday excursions and it's offered at an unbeatable price. It has a double collar, 1-inch double needle elastic waist and cuffs, taped contrast collar, two zippered front pockets, yolk front and double needle half-moon sweat patch. It includes an embroidered AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold. Available in a variety of colors.

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Oct. 24 SIPES Continuing Education Seminar, Houston Register Online
Nov. 1 Deadline to submit article for Student theme of The Professional Geologist Send articles to Vickie Hill
Nov. 10 AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver Register Online
Dec. 15-19 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco AGU
Jan. 1, 2015 Deadline for AIPG membership dues Pay Online
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section



FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR
'Strikingly geometric' shapes hidden on moon's surface
LiveScience
A massive feature on the moon formed due to lunar rifts, in a surprise revision to earlier theories, research shows. Previously, scientists thought the moon's Ocean of Storms was a round crater left after a giant impact, but now researchers have found it is underlain by a giant rectangle created by cooling lunar lava as the moon formed. This finding reveals the early moon was far more dynamic than previously thought, scientists added.

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3-D-printed rocks could change fracking practices
Live Science
Geologists are reproducing the microscopic, intricate pore networks of rocks in scaled up 3-D-printed models. Franek Hasiuk, a professor of geological and atmospheric sciences at Iowa State University in Ames, is printing replicas of the tiny holes at huge magnifications to get a better look at how fluids like oil flow through underground rock. Hasiuk thinks the research could have important implications for energy companies drilling miles underground to reach oil and gas reserves.

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AIPG 2015 National Executive Committee
AIPG
The four advisory board representatives were elected to the AIPG 2015 National Executive Committee on September 13, 2014 at the AIPG/AHS National Conference in Prescott, Arizona. Those elected are: Christine F. Lilek, CPG-10195, Wisconsin; Keri A. Nutter, CPG-11579, Alaska; David G. Pyles, CPG-07364, Illinois, and Ronald J. Wallace, CPG-08153, Georgia. Follow the "Read More" link to view the complete list of 2015 Executive Committee Officers and contact information.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Air pollution is driving fewer monsoons?
Nature World News
A new study has found that pollutant emissions produced by human activity has been causing the world's total annual monsoon rainfall to decline over the past five decades. And while that may be good news for some flood-prone regions, experts do not doubt that it has had a significant adverse impact on delicate ecologies. That's all according to a study recently published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.
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Previous studies underestimated ocean warming by as much as 58 percent
Tech Times
Global ocean warming has been underestimated by as much as 58 percent in previous studies, reveals a latest research. Dr. Paul Durack, an Australian oceanographer from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, suggests that the underestimation has been due to scarce historic temperature data of the Southern Ocean. The oceans in the southern hemisphere comprises about 60 percent of the total world's oceans. It includes Indian Ocean, South Atlantic, South Pacific and Southern oceans. Scientists have not sampled these oceans as much as they have sampled the oceans of the northern hemisphere.
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Earth's ocean abyss is not heating up with global warming
Science World Report
While other parts of the world's oceans have warmed, it turns out that the cold abyss may have escaped that particular fate. Scientists have found that the Earth's deep ocean has not warmed measurably since 2005. In order to measure the deep ocean, NASA scientists turned to satellite and direct ocean temperature data from 2005 to 2013. They found that the ocean abyss below 1.24 miles has not warmed measurably, which may help explain the recent global warming "pause."
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The water on our planet may be older than the sun (The Washington Post)
Geologists seize on Mount St. Helens anniversary to highlight new technology (The Associated Press via The Oregonian)
USGS 'closely tracking' earthquake swarm (KPIX-TV)
Birds evolved from dinosaurs slowly — then took off (National Geographic)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Lizards in the Caribbean: How geography influences animal evolution
Phys.org
A new and potentially more revealing way of studying how animal evolution is affected by the geography of climate has been designed by researchers at The University of Nottingham and Harvard University. The research, published in the prestigious journal, The American Naturalist, uses a new approach to investigate how animals across (interspecific) and within (intraspecific) species change in size along temperature gradients, shedding light on a 150-year-old evolutionary puzzle. Bergmann's rule — the tendency for warm-blooded animal body size to increase in colder environments — has long been controversial with debate around whether it applies to cold-blooded animals and how the rule applies within or among species.
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Violence of volcanoes is helping scientists monitor Earth's sensitive side
The Guardian
The Earth seems to have been smoking a lot recently. Volcanoes are erupting in Iceland, Hawaii, Indonesia, Ecuador and Mexico, as well as the recent eruption of Japan's Mount Ontake. Others, in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea, erupted recently but seem to have calmed down. Many of these have threatened homes and forced evacuations. Among their spectators, these eruptions raise question: Is there such a thing as a season for volcanic eruptions? While volcanoes may not have "seasons" as we know them, scientists have started to discern intriguing patterns in their activity.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Volcanoes.


WSGS releases study on potential link between injection wells and earthquakes
Wyoming State Geological Survey via County 10
Wyoming is a seismically active state, but the question of whether injection and disposal well activities by industry have contributed to earthquakes in the recent past was the focus of an investigation by the Wyoming State Geological Survey. After evaluating data and records for the entire state, five sites with injection and disposal wells and past earthquakes warranted further investigation. While WSGS geologists found no link at four of the study sites, one site (Site C) near Bairoil, Wyoming may require further research before a determination can be made.
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