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Fewer geologists monitoring California quakes due to government shutdown
KCBS-FM
VideoBrief Earthquake monitoring in California is taking a hit, as the partial shutdown of the federal government continues. At the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif., the doors were locked. All but 43 of 8,600 full-time staffed geologists with the agency have been furloughed. In addition, USGS websites for the most part are down. In the meantime, earthquake detection lies in the hands of experts at the state level.
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Geologists take drill to Triassic park
Nature
Tourists flock to Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona to marvel at great glittering logs of petrified wood. But geologists hope to flock there this month in search of something less visible and more scientifically significant: a core obtained by drilling half a kilometer into rock more than 200 million years old.
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A new microalgae family identified
Fish Info & Services
Spanish and Australian researchers characterized a new family of unicellular microalgae belonging to the dinoflagellates, which they called Ceratoperidiniaceae. The described family includes dinoflagellate species that were poorly characterized and their phylogenetic relationships were unknown, which is why they had been classified as forming part of other families or genera.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Monitoring Surrogates at Fracking Sites

The development of oil and gas resources, especially by hydraulic fracturing, has increased concerns about potential groundwater contamination. Real-time groundwater quality monitoring networks may be feasible if pollutant-surrogate relationships are established. Learn about surrogates for methane and fracking fluid in a new white paper.
 


AIPG NEWS


Presenters wanted for the Geosciences Online Learning Initiative
AIPG
The Geosciences Online Learning Initiative is a webinar program developed in cooperation between the American Geosciences Institute and the American Institute of Professional Geologists. We welcome applications from presenters for a broad range of topics that may be informative and of interest to geoscientists, other scientists, educators/students, legislators and the public. The presentation format is live, using PowerPoint, and about 50 to 60 minutes in duration. The presentation may be recorded for additional viewing opportunities. These webinars may also be suitable for the award of continuing education units or continuing professional development. The AIPG website has additional information about the GOLI program. Please consider participating in the GOLI program as a presenter or in taking one of the courses.
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AIPG 50th Annual Meeting celebration
AIPG
Early registration has been extended for the AIPG 50th Annual Meeting that will be held Oct. 23-26, in Broomfield, Colo.

Meeting highlights: If you have any questions about the meeting, please contact AIPG National Headquarters at 303-412-6205 or aipg@aipg.org.

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AIPG microfleece vests available
AIPG
Add a cozy layer with our extra soft microfleece vest. Super lightweight, with an anti-pill finish, this super soft fleece vest offers great warmth at a great price. Available in men's and women's styles and colors.


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Geologists re-write Earth's history
IOL SciTech
Two University of Johannesburg researchers have contributed to a study which suggests that oxygen began to appear in the ocean and the atmosphere much earlier than generally thought. The study found that the oxygen began to appear in the atmosphere and ocean three billion years ago, which was 700 million years earlier than was commonly believed.

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Hints about the evolution of hominids
Arizona Daily Wildcat
Since the Scopes Trial in 1925, several transitional fossils have been discovered that document the progression to modern humanity and will aid in solving the problem of the "missing link." Now the work of 40 scientists across eight different countries aims to shed light, not on how the hominid changed, but why.

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Traces of immense prehistoric ice sheets discovered
Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers via Phys.org
Geologists and geophysicists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research, discovered traces of large ice sheets from the Pleistocene on a seamount off the north-eastern coast of Russia. These marks confirm for the first time that within the past 800,000 years in the course of ice ages, ice sheets more than a kilometer thick also formed in the Arctic Ocean.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Supervolcanoes on Mars
Sky & Telescope
When it comes to volcanoes, Mars has always outclassed Earth. At 22 kilometers above the surrounding plains, Olympus Mons is almost three times the height of Mount Everest. Mars' Alba Mons is one-third as wide as the United States (depending how you measure). But a new study in this a recent edition of Nature proposes that the largest volcanoes on Mars have gone unnoticed — until now.
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X-ray technique can image nano-properties in real time
The Engineer
Scientists have developed a new imaging technique that looks inside an object and maps the three-dimensional distribution of its nano-properties in real time. Researchers claim the technique could have a wide range of applications across many disciplines, such as materials science, geology, environmental science and medical research.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Technology.


Sinkhole terrain will challenge pipeline developers
The Courier-Journal
Even as landowners and officials battle the merits of the planned Bluegrass Pipeline, experts say that Kentucky's sinkhole and cavern-riddled geology poses major construction and operational challenges to its developers. One geologist said the potential problems are so significant that they need to be fully evaluated before any dirt gets turned on the plan to run about 150 miles of new 24-inch diameter pipeline through Kentucky. The pipeline would carry natural gas liquids from Pennsylvania to the Gulf Coast.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Scientists: New island off Pakistan's coast may be mud volcano (LiveScience via The Huffington Post)
Unlocking oil secrets stored in Alberta's core sample archive (Financial Post)
Granite Wars — Episode I: Fire & Water (Scientific American)
Marine science: Oceanography's billion-dollar baby (Nature)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Upper Peninsula is haven for geologists, miners and stone collectors
Detroit Free Press
From agates on a Lake Superior beach to the ancient, mineral-rich bedrock that forms it, Michigan's Upper Peninsula has long been a haven for geologists, miners and rock-hound hobbyists. It was once the source of 90 percent of copper in the United States, still provides 25 percent of the nation's iron and is the only place where you'll find chlorastrolite, or greenstone.
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The strange tale of the cursed brachiopod
The Columbus Dispatch
Fossils from the Cincinnati area are renowned for their abundance, variety and ease of collecting. The animals that produced those fossils lived at the end of the Ordovician Period 450 million years ago, and the last part of the Ordovician Period is known to geologists as the Cincinnatian Series. New research on Cincinnatian fossils is still being produced, despite having been rigorously studied for more than 150 years. One recent research paper in the journal Palaios was titled, "The Curse of Rafinesquin a: Negative taphonomic feedback exerted by strophomenid shells on storm-buried lingulids in the Cincinnatian Series (Katian, Ordovician) Series of Ohio."
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Researching climate through waves
KFMB-TV
Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and UCSD are celebrating a $20 million grant for a study that will ultimately show how waves impact weather and public health. Thanks to the grant from the National Science Foundation, a team of researchers will expand their aerosol study by five years and open doors to scientists beyond UCSD and Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
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