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Iron ore deposits could be easier to find
ninemsn
For many years finding large deposits of the world's most important commodity after oil has been difficult and largely haphazard. Small iron deposits are common but the giant deposits that the big miners are looking for are much harder to find.The problem is that geologists still don't know how those huge ore bodies form and that makes it hard to look for them. But three new studies may help solve those mysteries.
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Evidence of a comet that rained 'a shockwave of fire' detected on Earth
The Verge
A comet that struck Earth around 28 million years ago annihilated part of modern-day Egypt — but managed to leave behind a few relics for modern scientists to marvel over. According to a team of South African researchers, a small pebble discovered by an Egyptian geologist in 1996 has been identified as having come from an ancient comet. Although comet material has been identified in atmospheric and Antarctic dust, this pebble marks the first time that a comet fragment of such size has been found on Earth.
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Team of ocean scientists set sail on 48-day Equatorial Atlantic adventure
University of Bristol
A team of ocean scientists have set sail on a first-of-its-kind expedition across the Equatorial Atlantic to collect coral samples at depths of 4,000 meters to help understand the environmental controls on largely unexplored deep-sea ecosystems. The European Research Council-funded project comprises paleoceanographers, chemists, geologists and biologists, who will be collecting sediment cores, seawater and fossilized deep sea corals, making at least five major stops on seamounts and the mid-Atlantic Ridge.
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7 unbelievable natural eternal flames from around the world
The Weather Channel
Of the thousands of eternal flames across the globe, most are man-made, created either for religious reasons or to honor history's famous, such as Virginia's John F. Kennedy Memorial. But eternal flames that occur naturally are harder to come by. Here's a look at a few fascinating and lesser known natural eternal flames around the world, some of which have been burning for centuries.

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Geologists re-write Earth's history
IOL SciTech
Two University of Johannesburg researchers have contributed to a study which suggests that oxygen began to appear in the ocean and the atmosphere much earlier than generally thought. The study found that the oxygen began to appear in the atmosphere and ocean three billion years ago, which was 700 million years earlier than was commonly believed.

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Traces of immense prehistoric ice sheets discovered
Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers via Phys.org
Geologists and geophysicists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research, discovered traces of large ice sheets from the Pleistocene on a seamount off the north-eastern coast of Russia. These marks confirm for the first time that within the past 800,000 years in the course of ice ages, ice sheets more than a kilometer thick also formed in the Arctic Ocean.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Did a huge impact lead to the Cambrian Explosion?
Astrobiology Magazine
Could a large impact in the deep ocean have produced some of the most enigmatic features in our Earth's history? According to Grant Young, a geologist at the University of Western Ontario, the answer may be yes.
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US shutdown means one sad tale after another for scientists
The Conversation
As the budget impasse enters its third week, the list of programs and facilities affected is growing. Geologists and meteorologists must make do with limited resources, as only systems with a direct impact on health and safety remain accessible. Researchers submitting grants for funding find themselves in a holding pattern, uploading their proposals without acknowledgement. The grant review process is also suspended until further notice.
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3-D model reveals new information about iconic volcano
Uppsala University via Science Codex
The volcano on the Scottish peninsula Ardnamurchan is a popular place for the study of rocks and structures in the core of a volcano. Geology students read about it in text books and geologists have been certain that the Ardnamurchan volcano have three successive magma chambers. However, an international group of researchers, lead from Uppsala University, Sweden, has now showed that the volcano only has one single magma chamber.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Scientists: New island off Pakistan's coast may be mud volcano (LiveScience via The Huffington Post)
Unlocking oil secrets stored in Alberta's core sample archive (Financial Post)
Granite Wars — Episode I: Fire & Water (Scientific American)
Marine science: Oceanography's billion-dollar baby (Nature)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Appalachian geology professors collect evidence of mass extinction that occurred in Central Asia
Appalachian State University
Members of a U.N.-sponsored research team with members from Appalachian State University’s Department of Geology have found evidence for catastrophic oceanographic events associated with climate change and a mass extinction 375 million years ago that devastated tropical marine ecosystems.
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Nepal renews call for geologic survey consultants for 140-MW Tanahu hydro project
HydroWorld
Nepal hydro developer Tanahu Hydropower Ltd. has renewed a call for expressions of interest from geologic survey consultants to perform rock mechanical testing for the 140-MW Tanahu hydroelectric project on Nepal's Seti River. Responses now are due Nov. 1.
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Granite Wars — Episode II: A new phase
Scientific American
At the end of the 19th century and after the victory of "Plutonism" in the great Granite War, geologists accepted the idea that igneous rocks originate from deep inside earth. However the great variability of volcanic and plutonic rocks, from dark basalt to light-colored granite, was difficult to explain, as Earth's interior was assumed to be relatively uniform (based on the idea that earth formed by condensation of primordial matter, it was imagined like a succession of concentric shells).
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