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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Monitoring Surrogates at Fracking Sites

The development of oil and gas resources, especially by hydraulic fracturing, has increased concerns about potential groundwater contamination. Real-time groundwater quality monitoring networks may be feasible if pollutant-surrogate relationships are established. Learn about surrogates for methane and fracking fluid in a new white paper.
 


3-D tectonic modeling answers age-old geology question
Scientific Cmoputing
The theory of plate tectonics predicts that the outer layer of the earth is composed of approximately 15 tectonic plates that are in motion with respect to one another, and that the deformation of those plates will be concentrated at the boundary — where plates meet. For decades, tectonic modeling has embraced a limited, two-dimensional paradigm. However, scientists at the University of California, Davis, are exploring 3-D tectonic modeling and pushing the limits of high-performance computing.
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Finding alien worlds on Earth
Space Daily
The most hostile environments on Earth are home to unusual life forms. By studying these "extremophiles" that can cope with extreme heat, cold, pressure or radiation on Earth, astrobiologists can consider whether certain environments in space might be home to similar tiny creatures. Needing unspoiled land, often without vegetation, means that astrobiologists and geologists often find themselves in very remote places.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 5th Annual Meeting celebration is this week
AIPG
The AIPG 50th Annual Meeting will be held Oct. 23-26, in Broomfield, Colo. Daily and full registration is still open. Walk-ins are welcome. If you have any questions about the meeting please call AIPG National Headquarters at 303-412-6205 or email us at aipg@aipg.org.
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AIPG section newsletters are now available online
AIPG
The AIPG Michigan Section Newsletter — October 2013
The AIPG Northeast Section Newsletter — Winter 2013
The AIPG Texas Section News — September/October 2013
The AIPG Colorado Section Newsletter — September 2013
The AIPG Ohio Setion Newsletter — September 2013
The AIPG Michigan Section Newsletter — August 2013
The AIPG Georgia Section Newsletter — August 2013

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Get your AIPG travel mug
AIPG
Get this exclusive double-wall insulation mug that keeps the hots hot and the colds cold. Discover the comfortable handle with thumb grip and spill-resistant lid with thumb-slide opening that makes this mug so popular.

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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR
Mars-to-Earth 'shuttle' confirmed by NASA Curiosity rover
The Daily Galaxy
The surface of Mars is pocked by more than 635,000 impact craters at least 0.6 miles wide. A little-known fact is that each year, Earth is hit by by half a dozen or so one-pound or larger rocks that were blasted off the surface of Mars by large impacts and found their way into Earth-crossing orbits. Nearly 10 percent of the Red Planet meteorites end up crashing into Earth.

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7 unbelievable natural eternal flames from around the world
The Weather Channel
Of the thousands of eternal flames across the globe, most are man-made, created either for religious reasons or to honor history's famous, such as Virginia's John F. Kennedy Memorial. But eternal flames that occur naturally are harder to come by. Here's a look at a few fascinating and lesser known natural eternal flames around the world, some of which have been burning for centuries.

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Iron ore deposits could be easier to find
ninemsn
For many years finding large deposits of the world's most important commodity after oil has been difficult and largely haphazard. Small iron deposits are common but the giant deposits that the big miners are looking for are much harder to find.The problem is that geologists still don't know how those huge ore bodies form and that makes it hard to look for them. But three new studies may help solve those mysteries.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Deep sea riches could spark Pacific mining boom
ABC Radio National
A project to dig minerals from the seabed off Papua New Guinea could signal a new era of mining in the world's most remote and least understood environment — the deep sea. Mining companies are excited, ecologists are worried and struggling island nations are watching with interest.
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The complicated birth of a volcano
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel via ScienceDaily
They are difficult to reach, have hardly been studied scientifically and their existence does not fit into current geological models: the Marie Byrd Seamounts off the coast of Antarctica present many riddles to volcanologists. In the international journal "Gondwana Research," scientists just published possible explanations for the origin of these former volcanoes and thus contributed to the decryption of complex processes in the Earth's interior.
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Sea level rise means small storms may inflict hurricane-like flooding
UPI
Tufts University geologist Andrew Kemp has been researching sea-level change and flooding occurring in seven historically damaging hurricanes in New York since 1788. A research team led by Kemp has been able to reconstruct sea-level changes in the last 225 years. Rising sea levels are the result of two factors, the researchers said: a natural sinking of land called glacio-isostatic adjustment, and the melting of the ice-covered terrain of Greenland and Antarctic combined with the thermal expansion of ocean waters. The end result is the possibility storms less powerful than Hurrican Sandy could inflict serious damage, Kemp said.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Sea Level.


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    7 unbelievable natural eternal flames from around the world (The Weather Channel)
Evidence of a comet that rained 'a shockwave of fire' detected on Earth (The Verge)
3-D model reveals new information about iconic volcano (Uppsala University via Science Codex)
Did a huge impact lead to the Cambrian Explosion? (Astrobiology Magazine)
Granite Wars — Episode II: A new phase (Scientific American)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


How science figured out the age of the earth
Scientific American
For centuries scholars sought to determine the Earth's age. But the answer had to wait for careful geologic observation, isotopic analyses of the elements and an understanding of radioactive decay.
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Earth's core deceives scientists
Pravda.Ru
Scientists have virtually denied the existing hypothesis about the formation of the Earth's core. It was believed that the metal core of all celestial bodies is formed under the same scheme. However, recent experiments demonstrated that there are other ways to form the core. It turns out that this process should be seen as unique to each celestial body.
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Asbestos in rocks won't stop northern Wisconsin mine, GTac maintains
The Capital Times
Despite what one geologist calls an "abundant" quantity of asbestos-like mineral on the site, Gogebic Taconite has no plans to abandon efforts to develop a $1.5 billion open pit iron ore mine in northern Wisconsin. Bob Seitz, a spokesman for Gogebic Taconite, said there are ways to address the release of any asbestos during the mining process, where rocks are crushed and the iron ore extracted with magnets. He says it could as simple as using water to control dust at the site.
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