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The world's continents aren't always created in the way that we thought
The Conversation
From the 1950s until recently, we thought we had a clear idea of how continents form. Most people will have heard of plate tectonics: moving pieces on the surface of the planet that collide, pull away or slide past one another over millions of years to shape our world. Now we have new information that suggests that the process is more complex than we had thought.
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Worldwide surge in 'great' earthquakes seen in past 10 years
NBC News
The annual number of "great" earthquakes nearly tripled over the last decade, providing a reminder to Americans that unruptured faults like those in the northwest United States might be due for a Big One. Between 2004 and 2014, 18 earthquakes with magnitudes of 8.0 or more rattled subduction zones around the globe. That's an increase of 265 percent over the average rate of the previous century, which saw 71 great quakes, according to a report to the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Vancouver, British Columbia.
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Geologists face off over Yukon frontier
Nature
The walls of the Geological Survey of Canada's Vancouver office are, not surprisingly, plastered with maps. There's one of the country of Canada, one of the province of British Columbia and even a circumpolar Arctic map centered on the North Pole. But lying on the table of the survey's main conference room is a much more problematic map. It shows part of the far northern boundary between the United States and Canada, along a stretch between Alaska and the Yukon territory. And the two sides, on either side of the international border, do not match.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now available to pay online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2015, in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to log in to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205.

Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.

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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

Donate online.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  ENVIRONMENTAL AND GEOTECHNICAL DRILLING

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Request for award nominations
AIPG
Nominations for awards, accompanied by a supporting statement should be sent via mail (to AIPG, 12000 Washington Street, Thornton, Colorado 80241-3134), fax (303-253-9220) or email by Jan. 15 to the AIPG National Headquarters. National awards include the Ben H. Parker Memorial Medal, the Martin Van Couvering Memorial Award, the John T. Galey, Sr. Memorial Public Service Award, Honorary Membership and the Outstanding Achievement Award. (Click on each link to go to the award's description.) Click here for AIPG National Awards Nomination Form in pdf.
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AAPG Foundation Seeking 2015 Teacher of the Year
AAPG
Applications and nominations are being accepted for the 2015 Teacher of the Year (TOTY) Award. The TOTY award, given by the American Association for Petroleum Geologists Foundation, will once again be granted to a K-12 teacher within the United States who has demonstrated outstanding leadership in the field of geoscience education. The application deadline is Dec. 1.
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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

gtech.mst.edu
 


AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver
AIPG
The term "Social License to Operate" (SLO) was originally adopted for use by the Canadian mining industry in the late 1990s, and referred to the concept that social permission was needed for a mining company to conduct its operations, for example from local communities or indigenous people. Since then, the premise of the SLO has been extended to other geological challenges faced by society, such as fracking for oil and gas development, radioactive waste disposal, carbon capture and storage, geologic hazards, and deep-well injection of wastewater.

The lay public is frequently uninformed or misinformed about the complex scientific and technical challenges that accompany these issues. This problem is typically coupled with a general lack of knowledge about subsurface geology. The SLO seeks to alleviate this problem through a variety of public participation strategies to engage with citizens, communities, and stakeholder groups. Through this process, geoscientists can develop an understanding of public knowledge and concerns.

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Requesting articles for Student theme issue of The Professional Geologist (TPG) — Jan/Feb/Mar 2015
AIPG
Submit an article that will assist our student members in knowing what to be prepared for. This information will be placed in the upcoming Jan/Feb/Mar 2015 Student Issue of TPG. Your submittal can be a couple of paragraphs, a letter, an opinion piece, an article on what you are currently working on, photos, student chapter information, etc. Please see the requirements below for submitting an article for TPG. The deadline for submitting an article is Nov. 1.

Instructions to Authors

Articles may be technical or professional in nature. Articles containing news of importance to professional geologists will be considered. Articles should be submitted electronically via email in Word format to Vickie Hill at vlh@aipg.org. Graphics should also be submitted electronically in jpg, tiff, gif, ai, eps, psd or other standard format at 300 dpi.

Order Extra Copies of the Student Issue

The cost of the Student Issue is being discounted from $5 to $4 for quantities of 10 or more. Amount due ($4 x quantity) plus shipping and handling.

Shipping & Handling: Orders up to $15 add $8, orders $15.01-$30 ad $10, orders over $30 add $12. If weight of order exceeds 10 pounds, additional postage will apply. Please forward your order, with payment, to AIPG Headquarters no later than Dec. 1, 2014.

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AIPG briefcase
AIPG
The AIPG Expandable Briefcase has the AIPG logo, durable 600 denier polyester fabric and a large, padded main compartment with a laptop sleeve. It contains an organizational panel under the flap with a front slip pocket, a large zippered pocket in the front flap, detachable, adjustable, padded shoulder strap and a dual buckle closure on the front. Available in black, chili red, forest green, navy and twilight blue.


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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Nov. 1 Deadline to submit article for Student theme of The Professional Geologist Send articles to Vickie Hill
Nov. 10 AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver Register Online
Dec. 15-19 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco AGU
Jan. 1, 2015 Deadline for AIPG membership dues Pay Online
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section


INDUSTRY NEWS


A UC geologist uses 3-D to study cliff landscapes
WVXU-FM
A camera and a computer may be all it takes to scientifically map earth formations. Using a regular camera with Agisoft Photoscan software UC Geology Professor Dylan Ward pitched his tent at the bottom of a cliff near Ferron, Utah in May and began clicking away. He took 900 digital images at the base and once back in Cincinnati loaded them into the computer. The software, using a method called Structure-From-Motion Photogrammetry, crunched through all the images and found common features from different angles.
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Climbing Martian mountains from millions of miles away
BBC
Strictly speaking, Fred Calef III is geospatial information scientist for the Curiosity rover. But most people at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, refer to Calef as "the Keeper of the Maps." "I'm in charge of the base map for the Curiosity mission so we can locate the geology, identify points of interest and track where the rover is," Calef explains.
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Seismic network will measure the effects of ocean waves on Antarctic ice shelves
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Starting in November, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, researchers and colleagues will embark on an ambitious and arduous mission funded by National Science Foundation Polar Programs to install a seismic array on Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf. The data generated by the array is expected to deliver important new information on the dynamics of the stresses that wave impact vibrations place on ice shelves that extend out into the open ocean.
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Tiny piece of ancient Australia found beneath Vanuatu
The Guardian
A tiny piece of ancient Australia has been found under Vanuatu, raising new questions about how continents are made. Geologists thought the volcanic Vanuatu islands, about 2,200 km east of Townsville, Australia, were isolated from continental influences. But a research team from James Cook University believes Vanuatu's geological basement contains ancient material from northern Australia.
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Eucla Basin survey uncovers odd rock formations
Phys.org
Geologists have come to the tentative conclusion that relatively young Mesoproterozoic bedrock lies deep beneath the Nullabor, wedged between two much older formations. These formations are the Yilgarn Craton to the west and South Australia's Gawler Craton, both former tectonic plates. Geological Survey of Western Australia geologist Ian Tyler says data from a seismic survey along 860 km of railway line, from Haig east of Kalgoolie to Tarcoola in South Australia, is still being interpreted.
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Lake levels on the rise
Huron Daily Tribune
Water levels for Lake Michigan-Huron are slightly above average, and projections by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers indicate Great Lakes water levels will continue to move in an upward trend. Keith Kompoltowicz, chief of watershed hydrology for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District, said the organization tracks water levels on a monthly basis by taking the mean lake level over the entire lake.
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Residents wait for mountain to fall
Views and News from Norway
After being on alert for weeks, if not months, the now-evacuated residents of a deep valley in Norway's mountainous area of Romsdal were waiting for the steep mountainside high above them to come crashing down. Experts predict the huge expected rockslide may occur soon. The mountainside is known for being unstable, and geologists at the national preparedness center Aknes/Tafjord Beredskap IKS sounded the alarm on Oct. 22.
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