This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit November 04, 2014

Home   Membership   Events   Licensure   Educators   Jobs   Resources   Foundation   Contact      

 



New study finds oceans arrived early to Earth
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
Earth is known as the Blue Planet because of its oceans, which cover more than 70 percent of the planet's surface and are home to the world's greatest diversity of life. While water is essential for life on the planet, the answers to two key questions have eluded us: where did Earth's water come from and when?
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Colorado College geology professor makes discovery of career
The Gazette
Colorado College geology professor Christine Siddoway made the discovery of her career from the saddle of a road bike. It was during a climb through North Cheyenne Cañon Park that Siddoway, 52, glimpsed alternating bands of sandstone and granite fused vertically in a rocky slope off Cheyenne Cañon Road — a composition so unusual, she said she "almost fell over." But Siddoway's nearly decadelong investigation into that site and several others in the Rocky Mountains has some geologists reeling — potentially upending decades of established thought about the timing of geological processes that ultimately fractured an ancient supercontinent.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Lack of oxygen to blame for delay in complex life evolving on Earth
The Daily Beast
In terms of the Earth's history, complex life was relatively slow to evolve — and a new study finds a simple culprit. Life seems to have started on Earth almost as soon as the surface cooled off enough to make it possible. However, complex animal life — everything from insects to fish to humans — took a lot longer to show up. Given that modern animals are a phenomenally diverse group that evolved relatively quickly, why were they so slow to get going?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now available to pay online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2015, in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to log in to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205.

Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.

Share this article:   E-mail article


The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

Donate online.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  ENVIRONMENTAL AND GEOTECHNICAL DRILLING

Double J Drilling of W.Va.,Inc.is a woman-owned,small business with over 35 years performing drilling and well installation services for Government,Industry,and Consultants throughout the Mid-Atlantic region.

Phone: 304-375-4629             E-Mail: djdray@wirefire.com
 


AIPG new members and applicants listing
AIPG
Listing of New Members and Applicants for Aug. 8 through Oct. 30.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG

Share this article:   E-mail article


  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

gtech.mst.edu
 


Request for award nominations
AIPG
Nominations for awards, accompanied by a supporting statement should be sent via mail (to AIPG, 12000 Washington Street, Thornton, Colorado 80241-3134), fax (303-253-9220) or email by Jan. 15 to the AIPG National Headquarters. National awards include the Ben H. Parker Memorial Medal, the Martin Van Couvering Memorial Award, the John T. Galey, Sr. Memorial Public Service Award, Honorary Membership and the Outstanding Achievement Award. (Click on each link to go to the award's description.) Click here for AIPG National Awards Nomination Form in pdf.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Walk-ins Welcome; AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver
AIPG
The term "Social License to Operate" (SLO) was originally adopted for use by the Canadian mining industry in the late 1990s, and referred to the concept that social permission was needed for a mining company to conduct its operations, for example from local communities or indigenous people. Since then, the premise of the SLO has been extended to other geological challenges faced by society, such as fracking for oil and gas development, radioactive waste disposal, carbon capture and storage, geologic hazards, and deep-well injection of wastewater.

The lay public is frequently uninformed or misinformed about the complex scientific and technical challenges that accompany these issues. This problem is typically coupled with a general lack of knowledge about subsurface geology. The SLO seeks to alleviate this problem through a variety of public participation strategies to engage with citizens, communities, and stakeholder groups. Through this process, geoscientists can develop an understanding of public knowledge and concerns.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG polar fleece 1/4-zip pullover
AIPG
This polar fleece is soft, warm, and comfortable year around with a 1/4 zip pullover jacket with elastic waist and cuffs. Embroidered AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold. Available in several colors and sizes.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE



MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Nov. 10 AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver Register Online
Dec. 15-19 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco AGU
Jan. 1, 2015 Deadline for AIPG membership dues Pay Online
Jan. 16, 2015 Call for Abstracts due for the 5th Annual AIPG Michigan Section Technical Workshop: Site Characterization AIPG Michigan Section
Feb. 13, 2015 AIPG National Executive Committee Meeting Tucson, Arizona
March 2015 AIPG/AGWT Shale-Gas Development and Water Issues Conference Houston
April 2015 AIPG Hydraulic Fracturing Conference TBD
June 24-25, 2015 2015 Energy Exposition with Technical Sessions Presented by AIPG Billings, Montana
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section


INDUSTRY NEWS


Mega wave hit Oman's coast 4,500 years ago
Times of Oman
Geologists from GUtech, in cooperation with archeologists from the Ministry of Heritage and Culture, have dug up evidence of a tsunami or severe storm that hit Ras Al Hadd about 4,500 years ago. Dr. Goesta Hoffman, Associate Professor from the Applied Geosciences Department at GUtech, said there is evidence of major flooding at an archeological site in Ras Al Hadd, a village on the coast of Oman about 240 km southeast of Muscat.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Geologists in Costa Rica at the Turrialba Crater
The Costa Rica Star
Teams of earth scientists and emergency management officials who climbed to the top of the Turrialba volcano in Costa Rica issued a volcanology report that supports yellow alert conditions in the area. Although the presence of lava was not detected in the crater area, the colossus is still very active in terms of expelling other volcanic matter. The Turrialba volcano had been mostly dormant for more than a century prior to the powerful eruption detected on Oct. 29.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Rare, ferocious and 'Bigger Than T rex'
Mother Nature Network
It was 53 feet long from snout to tail, 9 feet longer than the largest known dinosaur, Tyrannosaurus rex. The enormous dinosaur — named Spinosaurus after the ridge of bony spines on its back — has remained elusive, until now.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The world's continents aren't always created in the way that we thought (The Conversation)
Worldwide surge in 'great' earthquakes seen in past 10 years (NBC News)
Geologists face off over Yukon frontier (Nature)
Residents wait for mountain to fall (Views and News from Norway)
Lake levels on the rise (Huron Daily Tribune)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Recreating geology millions of years old, using a 3-D printer
The Diamondback
Though the planet's rocks, landscapes and fossils took millions and sometimes billions of years to form the first time around, University of Maryland geologists hope to recreate some of them in a matter of hours. Researchers in the university's geology department have started a LaunchUMD campaign to raise funds for a planned 3-D printing lab for their department. Such a lab would make it possible for students and faculty to print and study geological formations that are otherwise not so easily accessible, said Nicholas C. Schmerr, a university geology professor.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Crater hunters find new clues to ancient impact storm
LiveScience via Yahoo
Back when Wisconsin and western Russia once shared an address south of the equator, a violent collision in the asteroid belt blasted Earth with meteorites. The space rock smashup showered Earth with up to 100 times more meteorites than today's rate. Yet, only a dozen or so impact craters have been found from the ancient bombardment 470 million years ago, during the Ordovician Period. There are only about 185 known impact craters on Earth of any age. But the number of Ordovician craters may soon take off.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Craters.


Wall of wind: Giant machines help South Florida dissect hurricanes
WPTV-TV
Florida, the most storm-battered state in the nation, now is home to groundbreaking research that allows scientists to dissect the raw power of hurricanes. It's not easy to witness the destructive power of a Category 5 hurricane up close and personal. Yet that's what University of Miami scientists can now do inside a tank the size of an indoor swimming pool, housed in the school's new $50 million Marine Technology and Life Sciences Seawater Complex. It is the only test laboratory in the world where hurricane conditions are so authentically recreated, said Roni Avissar, dean of UM's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Scientists debunk Clearwater Lakes formation theory
Phys.org
UWA geologists have helped debunk a long-held belief that twin asteroids formed Canada's Clearwater Lakes. Geo-chronologist Martin Schmieder says one of the two circular structures in Quebec is almost 200 million years older than the other. He says the western lake formed about 286 million years ago in the Permian era, while the eastern lake is about 460–470 million years old, putting it in the Ordovician era. Dr. Schmieder led an international team examining core samples collected by the Canadian Geological Survey in the 1960s and 1970s.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 

AIPG eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
View media kit

Jason Zimmerman, Assistant Executive Editor, 469.420.2604   
Contribute news

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the AIPG eNews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Oct. 28, 2014
Oct. 22, 2014
Oct. 14, 2014
Oct. 7, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063