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Continent-sized scan reveals US underbelly
LiveSceince via Yahoo News
A continent-sized scan of North America is giving researchers the sharpest view yet of mysterious geological structures underneath the United States. The impressive view comes from an ambitious experiment called EarthScope, which has scanned the country from California to Maine using hundreds of portable seismometers. (The next stop is Alaska.) Launched in 2004, the massive effort has already revealed new details about the geology of the western and central United States, such as the shape of Yellowstone's magma plume. Now, the first clear images of the entire continent are beginning to emerge.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Mapping.




NASA Mars rover finds key evidence for lake at landing site
Reuters
Billions of years ago, a lake once filled the 96-mile- (154-km) wide crater being explored by NASA's Mars rover Curiosity, bolstering evidence that the planet most like Earth in the solar system was suitable for microbial life, scientists said on Dec. 8. The new findings combine more than two years of data collected by the rover since its sky-crane landing inside Gale Crater in August 2012.
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Why the DC region is literally sinking into the sea
National Post via The Washington Post
The sea is rising. Records from over a century of tide gauges worldwide show a steady upward trend, a few millimeters each year on average. The mid-Atlantic in particular has witnessed some of the fastest encroachment. Over the past century, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates that sea levels have been rising roughly 1.8 millimeters a year. In the region between New Jersey and Virginia, it's been double that. In the past couple of decades, satellite measurements have confirmed what geologists have long suspected: It's not just that the sea is rising. The land here is sinking.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist (TPG)
AIPG
The AIPG quarterly journal, The Professional Geologist, October/November/December 2014 issue is now available online.
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AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now available to pay online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2015, in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to log in to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205.

Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.

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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
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Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

Donate online.

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Request for award nominations
AIPG
Nominations for awards, accompanied by a supporting statement should be sent via mail (to AIPG, 12000 Washington Street, Thornton, Colorado 80241-3134), fax (303-253-9220) or email by Jan. 15 to the AIPG National Headquarters. National awards include the Ben H. Parker Memorial Medal, the Martin Van Couvering Memorial Award, the John T. Galey, Sr. Memorial Public Service Award, Honorary Membership and the Outstanding Achievement Award. (Click on each link to go to the award's description.) Click here for AIPG National Awards Nomination Form in pdf.
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AIPG polar fleece vest available
AIPG
Ready for layering, this super soft fleece vest offers great warmth at a great price. It is embroidered with AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold. Available colors: black, navy, grey heather, royal, charcoal, midnight heather and red. Women's vests and other apparel are available.

     

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Dec. 15-19 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco AGU
Jan. 1, 2015 Deadline for AIPG membership dues Pay Online
Jan. 16, 2015 Call for Abstracts due for the 5th Annual AIPG Michigan Section Technical Workshop: Site Characterization AIPG Michigan Section
Feb. 13, 2015 AIPG National Executive Committee Meeting Tucson, Arizona
March 2015 AIPG/AGWT Shale-Gas Development and Water Issues Conference Houston
April 2015 AIPG Hydraulic Fracturing Conference TBD
June 24-25, 2015 2015 Energy Exposition with Technical Sessions Presented by AIPG Billings, Montana
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section


INDUSTRY NEWS


Eerie quiet at Northwest fault where 'big one' may shake
The Associated Press via Chinook Observer
Any parent of a rambunctious youngster can tell you trouble might be afoot when things go quiet in the playroom. Two independent research initiatives indicate there is a comparable situation with the Cascadia earthquake fault zone. The fault zone expected to generate the next big one lies underwater between 40 and 80 miles offshore of the Pacific Northwest coastline. Earthquake scientists have listening posts along the coast from Vancouver Island to Northern California.
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Mile-wide Martian mystery cookie puzzles astronomers
NBC News
VideoBrief Amid miles of perfectly flat lava flows in the Athabasca region of Mars, this enormous mound appears out of nowhere, looking for all the world like a titanic cookie — and scientists are unable to account for it. Athabasca is characterized by some of the youngest lava on the planet, forming a smooth surface yet to be marred by stress cracks and meteor impacts. The 1.2-mile-wide cookie is one of several such formations in the area, but how they came to exist is still a mystery.
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Physicist presents new observational solar weather model
University of Alabama in Huntsville via Phys.org
Scientists now have an observational framework to help predict solar weather and how it will affect Earth. "Now it's possible that we can have a space weather model that's like Earth's meteorology," says physicist Dr. S.T. Wu, distinguished professor emeritus of The University of Alabama in Huntsville Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. That's thanks to the observation-based model that predicts the occurrence and timing of solar mass ejections.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Lucky strike in search for Earth's most common mineral (New Scientist)
Asteroid impact 3.3 billion years ago 'dwarfed the dinosaur-extinction event' (The Daily Galaxy)
Geologists discover widespread seismic activity in Indiana (Lexington Herald-Leader)
Scientists may be cracking mystery of big 1872 earthquake (The Seattle Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Hundreds of methane seeps discovered along the US East Coast
American Geosciences Institute via Science Codex
Methane is often found naturally leaking from the seafloor, particularly in petroleum basins like the Gulf of Mexico or along tectonically active continental margins like the U.S. West Coast, but such plumes were not expected along passive margins, like the East Coast of North America. Now, however, the discovery of hundreds of methane seeps on the seafloor along the U.S. East Coast suggests that such reservoirs may be more common along passive margins than previously thought.
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Why is Antarctic sea ice getting thicker?
The Conversation via Science 2.0
For several years now climatologists have puzzled over an apparent conundrum: why is Antarctic sea ice continuing to expand while Arctic sea ice has been declining rapidly (by some 13 percent per decade in late summer)? The Antarctic recently saw a third consecutive record year of sea ice coverage. The two previous records were set in 2012 and 2013. To help get to the bottom of this mystery, one team of scientists have enlisted an underwater robot to help measure the thickness of the ice.
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Plant fossils in Argentina may be younger than previously thought
RedOrbit
Molecular clocks — based on changes in genetic material — indicate much younger ages for a wide variety of plant fossils in southern Argentina than do the solid, geologic dates of those fossils, according to geoscientists who surveyed recent paleobotanical discoveries in Patagonia. The finding suggests serious biases in molecular clocks, which are heavily used to date many kinds of living things. It also directly refutes a widely held idea about how most Southern Hemisphere plant and animal groups attained their current distributions.
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