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Deep-sea study reveals cause of 2011 tsunami: Unusually thin, slippery geological fault found
McGill University via ScienceDaily
The devastating tsunami that struck Japan's Tohoku region in March 2011 was touched off by a submarine earthquake far more massive than anything geologists had expected in that zone. Now, a team of scientists has published a set of studies in the journal Science that shed light on what caused the dramatic displacement of the seafloor off the northeastern coast of Japan.
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Geology: North America's broken heart
Nature
A billion years ago, a huge rift nearly cleaved North America down the middle. And then it failed. Researchers may be getting close to finding out why.
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Marine fossils discovered in upper part of the Permian Linxi Formation, China
redOrbit
In a recent study, large numbers of bryozoan and other typical marine fossils were discovered for the first time in the thick limestone layers and lenses of the upper part of the Linxi Formation of the Guandi section, Linxi County, eastern Inner Mongolia. These marine fossils provide the first evidence for the Xingmeng area being in a marine or mainly marine environment at the end of the later part of the late Permian.
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AIPG NEWS


New York State Geologist
New York State Education Department
The New York State Museum anticipates filling a position of Museum Scientist 4, a mid-level curatorial position. Under the general supervision of the Director of Research and Collections the Museum Scientist 4 serves as New York State Geologist, curates the State Museum's sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous rock core collection, performs and disseminates related research, supervises subordinate collections and research staff, and contributes to exhibition, public and educational programming. The application closing date is Dec. 27.
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Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism
AIPG
The Member Organizations of the International Union of Geological Science's new Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism are pleased to report on its recent progress and to announce the launch of its website at www.tg-ggp.org, as a service to geoscientists and the geoscience profession. The TG-GGP will continue to expand this website to add to its value to the profession, globally.
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AIPG section newsletters
AIPG
The following section newsletters are new available online:
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Colorado State Geologist
Colorado School of Mines
Colorado is looking for a new State Geologist and the Colorado Survey is now part of CSM. Please pass this along to anyone you might think is interested.
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Only 2 days left! Submit your abstract for the 2014 Unconventional Resources Technology Conference Aug. 25-27 in Denver
AIPG
Participate in the hugely successful URTeC where thousands of oil and gas professionals from an integrated audience including engineers, geoscientists, financiers, land men, researchers and more get connected on the most up to date information in the development of North American resource plays. It's the only event leveraging expertise from unconventional resource groups focusing on an asset team approach for successful field development. Don't miss out on this professional opportunity to showcase your knowledge and expertise! Abstracts must be submitted online.
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Accepting applications for the position of AIPG Executive Director
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The successful candidate will succeed the current director who has announced his intent to retire. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
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AIPG polar fleece full zip jacket
AIPG
This exceptionally soft fleece jacket will keep you warm during everyday excursions and it's offered at an unbeatable price. It has a double collar, 1-inch double needle elastic waist and cuffs, taped contrast collar, two zippered front pockets, yolk front and double needle half-moon sweat patch. It includes an embroidered AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold. Available in a variety of colors.

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Did volcano on Mercury erupt for a billion years?
Space.com
Sitting just 36 million miles in front of our star, sun-baked Mercury receives a colossal dose of solar radiation with almost no atmosphere to soften the blast. Since Mariner 10 first revealed its surface in the 1970s, conspicuously smooth plains suggested that in places, the impact craters had once been resurfaced by giant lava flows. And now, NASA's latest mission to the inner solar system has begun to shed new light on its volcanic past.

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Physicists prove foaming beer bottle trick may help understand volcanic eruptions
The Telegraph
For Isaac Newton it was an apple falling from a tree that helped him devise one of the most significant theories in physics. Now almost 350 years later, scientists have turned to another mundane object in an attempt to understand more about the world around us. They are attempting to study the complex phenomonen of bubble dynamics by looking at the party prank where tapping the top of a bottle of beer causes it to overflow with foam.

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New study identifies inaccuracies, more precisely locates San Andreas Fault trace
redOrbit
The exact location of the San Andreas Fault has been a mystery over the past century. But with work being performed by local and regional researchers, northern California will no longer be living a lie. The study employed a combination of new technologies along with old photographs to help locate the exact location of the fault line.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


USGS estimates 6.9 trillion cubic feet of recoverable natural gas in Denmark
The Daily Fusion
According to the United States Geological Survey, the Alum Shale in Denmark contains an estimated mean of 6.9 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered, technically recoverable natural gas. This estimate comes from the first-ever USGS assessment of shale gas resources in Denmark.
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Lasers and lava: 3-D imaging reveals details of volcanic flows
LiveScience
As if volcanic eruptions weren't flashy enough on their own, volcanologists have added more flare to their research by using lasers to scan lava flows. The results not only produce compelling 3-D images of lava flows, but also help hazard-mitigation teams prepare vulnerable communities for future flows, researchers say.
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Researchers focus on remnants of colossal extinction impact from 65 million years ago
The Daily Galaxy
Sixty five million years ago, an asteroid or comet crashed into a shallow sea near what is now the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. The resulting firestorm and global dust cloud caused the extinction of many land plants and large animals, including most of the dinosaurs. At the meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco, researchers will present evidence that remnants from this devastating impact are exposed along the Campeche Escarpment — an immense underwater cliff in the southern Gulf of Mexico.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Guadalupe Mountains get special geological designation (Carlsbad Current Argus)
Duvernay: The next big shale play? (Leader-Post)
'Door to Hell': Turkmenistan crater has been on fire for over 40 years (International Science Times)
'Protective' marine worm discovered (FIS)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Mars lake 'much like early Earth'
BBC News
The ancient lake environment found in Mars' Gale Crater could have supported microbes called chemolithoautotrophs — if they had been present. That is the conclusion of scientists after reviewing all the pictures and other data gathered in the deep impact bowl by Nasa's Curiosity rover. Chemolithoautotrophs do not need light to function; instead, they break down rocks and minerals for energy. On Earth, they exist underground, in caves and at the bottom of the ocean.
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Rocks reveal ocean ridge development
University of Wyoming via Phys.org
A University of Wyoming husband-and-wife research team was part of a larger group that has made the first significant recovery of layered igneous rocks from the Earth's lowest ocean crust. The discovery — found in the "Hess Deep Rift" in the Pacific Ocean — confirms a long-held belief among geologists that such rocks are a key part of the lower ocean crust formed at fast-spreading ridges.
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Geologists digging into Mima mounds mystery, say gophers behind it
LiveScience via NBC News
A new twist on an old mystery may finally settle the debate over the origin of Mima mounds, which bulge out of the ground like enormous, grass-covered bubble wrap. Mima mounds were named in 1841, when a vast pimply prairie was discovered in western Washington during the United States Exploring Expedition. In the centuries since, the source of this strange landscape has defied explanation. A single field may be covered in a million mounds that are several thousand years old, yet no builder has ever been found.
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