This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit Dec. 31, 2013

Home   Membership   Events   Licensure   Educators   Jobs   Resources   Foundation   Contact      



AIPG NEWS

 
As 2013 comes to a close, the American Institute Professional Geologists wishes you a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year, we are providing you a look at the most-accessed articles from the year. The regular publication of AIPG eNews will resume Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014.


US tallest mountain's surprising location explained
LiveScience
From Sept. 3: Reaching 20,320 feet above sea level in south-central Alaska, Mount McKinley is North America's tallest mountain and the third tallest mountain in the world (based on the measurement from base to peak on land, and not based on elevation). The behemoth has long befuddled geologists because it stands far inland, more than 300 miles away from major mountain-building tectonic activity along Alaska's southern coast.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Earth's 100,000-year Ice Age cycle decoded
PTI via Money Control
From Aug. 13: Scientists have explained a new mechanism behind Earth's 100,000-year Ice Age cycle that points to the alternating influence of continental ice sheets and climate on this global climatic interchange. Science has struggled to explain fully why an ice age occurs every 100,000 years. As researchers now demonstrate based on a computer simulation, not only do variations in insolation play a key role, but also the mutual influence of glaciated continents and climate.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Yellowstone's Steamboat Geyser roars to life for 1st time in 8 years
NBC News
From Aug. 6: Yellowstone's Steamboat Geyser erupted for the first time in eight years on the afternoon of July 31, drenching delighted viewers who stood in the spray from the safety of a nearby boardwalk. The unexpected blast occurred at 7:30 p.m. MDT, shooting water and steam 200 to 300 feet into the air. The spectacular display lasted nine minutes.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Greenland ice sheet was smaller 3,000-5,000 years ago
redOrbit
From Nov. 26: There have been many studies telling us how small the Greenland ice sheet is today. A new study, published in the journal Geology, reveals that the ice sheet was actually smaller between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago. Surprisingly, the sheet was as small during this period as it has ever been in recent history.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR
20 ancient supervolcanoes discovered in Utah and Nevada
Sci-News.com
Geologists from Brigham Young University, Berkeley Geochronology Center and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have found evidence of twenty ancient supervolcanoes near the Utah-Nevada border. The newly discovered supervolcanoes aren't active today, but 30 million years ago more than 5,500 cubic km of magma erupted during a one-week period near a place called Wah Wah Springs.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Did volcano on Mercury erupt for a billion years?
Space.com
Sitting just 36 million miles in front of our star, sun-baked Mercury receives a colossal dose of solar radiation with almost no atmosphere to soften the blast. Since Mariner 10 first revealed its surface in the 1970s, conspicuously smooth plains suggested that in places, the impact craters had once been resurfaced by giant lava flows. And now, NASA's latest mission to the inner solar system has begun to shed new light on its volcanic past.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Geology: North America's broken heart
Nature
A billion years ago, a huge rift nearly cleaved North America down the middle. And then it failed. Researchers may be getting close to finding out why.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more




Geologists find oldest, largest meteorite impact structure
Laboratory Equipment
From Nov. 19: The world's largest and oldest meteorite impact structure has been discovered through research on the formation of gold deposits in Western Australia's Eastern Goldfields. Located in the eastern Yilgarn, the Watchorn Impact Structure is 560 km in diameter at its widest point and estimated to be more than 2.6 billion years old.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Solid profession: Geologists in demand as shale plays surge
Houston Chronicle
From Nov. 19: Geologist Barry Katz, Ph.D., and president of the Houston Geological Society, became interested in science in high school, and he liked being outdoors. Those interests led to his study of geology and culminated in earning a doctorate in marine geology and geophysics. "Everybody's hiring," Katz said. "There are approximately 4,000 geologists in Houston alone. Many are close to retirement. With the various shale plays around the country along with multiple sites in Texas, demand for geologists is high." So, who makes the best geologist?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Submerged volcanoes cast doubt on Antarctic glaciation theory
Sci-News.com
From July 16: The Antarctic Circumpolar Current, an ocean current flowing clockwise around the entire continent, insulates Antarctica from warmer ocean water to the north, helping maintain the ice sheet. For several decades, scientists have surmised that the onset of a complete ACC played a critical role in the initial glaciation of the continent about 34 million years ago. But researchers have found geologic evidence that casts doubt on this theory.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Seawater discovered near the Chesapeake Bay is up to 150 million years old
The Washington Post
From Nov. 26: Not only is the Chesapeake Bay so enormous it can be seen from space, it essentially came from outer space. An asteroid or huge chunk of ice slammed into Earth about 35 million years ago, splashing into the Early Cretaceous North Atlantic, sending tsunamis as far as the Blue Ridge Mountains and leaving a 56-mile-wide hole at the mouth of what is now the bay. But a newly published research paper written by U.S. Geological Survey scientists shows that wasn't the end of it.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Rediscovery of rare mineral deposit by WMU geologists and private company could boost Michigan economy
MLive
From Sept. 17: Western Michigan University's Michigan Geological Repository for Research and Education, working in conjunction with the company Michigan Potash, said that it has rediscovered a mineral deposit in West Michigan potentially worth billions of dollars that could establish Michigan as a leading U.S. supplier of a key fertilizer used by farmers worldwide.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Stonehenge: Origin of stones discovered
Epoch Times
From Nov. 26: Geologists in Wales have identified the source of stones used to build Stonehenge, they told local publication the Western Mail on Nov. 19. The stones were transported from a hill in Pembrokeshire, Wales, U.K., about 150 miles away from the Stonehenge site and about a mile away from where they were previously thought to originate.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

AIPG eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
View media kit

Jason Zimmerman, Content Editor, 469.420.2604   
Contribute news

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the AIPG eNews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Dec. 17, 2013
Dec. 10, 2013
Dec. 3, 2013
Nov. 26, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063