This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit September 30, 2014

Home   Membership   Events   Licensure   Educators   Jobs   Resources   Foundation   Contact      

 



The water on our planet may be older than the sun
The Washington Post
When you take a sip from your water bottle, you just might be swallowing molecules older than the sun itself. And this new discovery won't just make you think twice about the wonders of hydration — it actually bolsters our hopes of finding life on other planets. At some point, our solar system gained access to water — the molecule that would one day be a vital component to life on Earth. But how did it get here? It seems like a simple question, but scientists have been puzzled ... until now.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Geologists seize on Mount St. Helens anniversary to highlight new technology
The Associated Press via The Oregonian
Ten years ago, Mount St. Helens awoke from an 18-year geological slumber. The news media and volcano-watchers flocked to Johnston Ridge, the closest road with a crater view. Though the mountain isn't getting as much publicity these days, scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are marking the anniversary to highlight new eruption warning technology they've installed around the volcano since then and to remind people that Mount St. Helens will continue to rebuilt itself.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Birds evolved from dinosaurs slowly — then took off
National Geographic
Birds evolved from dinosaurs in patchwork fashion over tens of millions of years before finally taking to the skies some 150 million years ago, paleontologists report. Paleontologists once supposed that the earliest bird, 150-million-year-old Archaeopteryx, represented a great evolutionary leap from dinosaurs. But over the past two decades, new discoveries have revealed that many of its avian traits had evolved in dinosaurs long before.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now available to pay online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2015 in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to log in to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
Share this article:   E-mail article


The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

Donate online.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  ENVIRONMENTAL AND GEOTECHNICAL DRILLING

Double J Drilling of W.Va.,Inc.is a woman-owned,small business with over 35 years performing drilling and well installation services for Government,Industry,and Consultants throughout the Mid-Atlantic region.

Phone: 304-375-4629             E-Mail: djdray@wirefire.com
 


The William J. Siok Graduate Scholarship
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has established in 2014 the William J. Siok Graduate Scholarship. Supporting Advanced Education in the Geosciences and Hydrogeology. Contributions can be made online, mailed or included with your dues.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG Student Mentor Program
AIPG
The AIPG has almost 3,000 student members and mentors are needed. If you are interested in becoming a mentor please login to your online profile and click on the mentor check off box. Students are asked to check off the mentee box if they would like to have a mentor. Mentoring students is one of the most important and lasting contributions that a geologist can make to the profession. If you need assistance email the office at aipg@aipg.org.
Share this article:   E-mail article


  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

gtech.mst.edu
 


AIPG 2015 National Executive Committee
AIPG
The four advisory board representatives were elected to the AIPG 2015 National Executive Committee on September 13, 2014 at the AIPG/AHS National Conference in Prescott, Arizona. Those elected are: Christine F. Lilek, CPG-10195, Wisconsin; Keri A. Nutter, CPG-11579, Alaska; David G. Pyles, CPG-07364, Illinois, and Ronald J. Wallace, CPG-08153, Georgia. Follow the "Read More" link to view the complete list of 2015 Executive Committee Officers and contact information.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Requesting articles for Student theme issue of The Professional Geologist (TPG) — Jan/Feb/Mar 2015
AIPG
Submit an articles that will assist our student members in knowing what to be prepared for. This information will be placed in the upcoming Jan/Feb/Mar 2015 Student Issue of TPG. Your submittal can be a couple of paragraphs, a letter, an opinion piece, an article on what you are currently working on, photos, student chapter information, etc. Please see the requirements below for submitting an article for TPG. The deadline for submitting an article is Nov. 1, 2014.

Instructions to Authors

Articles may be technical or professional in nature. Articles containing news of importance to professional geologists will be considered. Articles should be submitted electronically via email in Word format to Vickie Hill at vlh@aipg.org. Graphics should also be submitted electronically in jpg, tiff, gif, ai, eps, psd or other standard format at 300 dpi.

Order Extra Copies of the Student Issue

The cost of the Student Issue is being discounted from $5 to $4 for quantities of 10 or more. Amount due ($4 x quantity) plus shipping and handling.

Shipping & Handling: Orders up to $15 add $8, orders $15.01-$30 ad $10, orders over $30 add $12. If weight of order exceeds 10 pounds, additional postage will apply. Please forward your order, with payment, to AIPG Headquarters no later than Dec. 1, 2014.

Share this article:   E-mail article


AIPG/AHS National Conference photos
AIPG
Photos from the AIPG/AHS National Conference are available online. Those that attended are encouraged and welcome to include their photos. Here are some additional photo links that have been sent in:
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG

Share this article:   E-mail article


AIPG Quarterly Journal
AIPG
The Professional Geologist July/August/September issue is now available online. All past issues are also available online.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver
AIPG
The term "Social License to Operate" (SLO) was originally adopted for use by the Canadian mining industry in the late 1990s, and referred to the concept that social permission was needed for a mining company to conduct its operations, for example from local communities or indigenous people. Since then, the premise of the SLO has been extended to other geological challenges faced by society, such as fracking for oil and gas development, radioactive waste disposal, carbon capture and storage, geologic hazards, and deep-well injection of wastewater.

The lay public is frequently uninformed or misinformed about the complex scientific and technical challenges that accompany these issues. This problem is typically coupled with a general lack of knowledge about subsurface geology. The SLO seeks to alleviate this problem through a variety of public participation strategies to engage with citizens, communities, and stakeholder groups. Through this process, geoscientists can develop an understanding of public knowledge and concerns.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


AIPG hooded pullover sweatshirt
AIPG
This pullover hooded sweatshirt is 7.8-ounce, 50/50 cotton/poly PrintPro® XP low pill, air jet spun yarn, with high-stitch density fleece, two-ply hood with grommets and dyed-to-match draw-cord, set-in sleeves, front pouch pocket and embroidered AIPG logo with pick and gavel. Available colors: Ash, Black, Deep Forest, Deep Red, Deep Royal, Gold, Kelly Green, Light Blue, Light Steel, Maroon, Navy, Orange, Pale Pink, Purple, Smoke Grey, White. Available sizes: Small-3XL.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE



MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Nov. 10 AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver Register Online
Dec. 15-19 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco AGU
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section



FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR
3-D-printed rocks could change fracking practices
Live Science
Geologists are reproducing the microscopic, intricate pore networks of rocks in scaled up 3-D-printed models. Franek Hasiuk, a professor of geological and atmospheric sciences at Iowa State University in Ames, is printing replicas of the tiny holes at huge magnifications to get a better look at how fluids like oil flow through underground rock. Hasiuk thinks the research could have important implications for energy companies drilling miles underground to reach oil and gas reserves.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Miranda: An icy moon deformed by tidal heating
Geological Society of America via Science Codex
Miranda, a small, icy moon of Uranus, is one of the most visually striking and enigmatic bodies in the solar system. Despite its relatively small size, Miranda appears to have experienced an episode of intense resurfacing that resulted in the formation of at least three remarkable and unique surface features — polygonal-shaped regions called coronae.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Finding faults: Scientists close in on Napa quake origins
KQED Public Media
Geologists now say that the Aug. 24 South Napa quake created more surface fractures than any known quake of its size in California. Weeks after the magnitude-6.0 shaker, a new picture is emerging of the complex geology underneath. The quake is literally re-drawing the fault maps and providing valuable clues to the next major seismic event.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more




INDUSTRY NEWS


New study shows White River Ash as far away as Europe
KDLG-FM
Over one thousand years ago, a volcano erupted on the Yukon-Alaska border leaving behind White River Ash on a massive area of the region. However, a recent study shows that the affected area may have been even larger. The eruption in question took place in 850 AD at Mount Churchill in southeastern Alaska. The original theory was the ash produced by that eruption covered 1,000 kilometers; however, researchers have now found that the area is far more expansive.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


USGS 'closely tracking' earthquake swarm
KPIX-TV
The United States Geological Survey announced on its website that it was "closely tracking" a swarm of hundreds of earthquakes that began Sept. 25, located in Long Valley about 7 miles east of the Sierra Nevada resort town of Mammoth Lakes. The region, known to geologists as the Long Valley Caldera, is the site of one of North America's greatest pre-historic eruptions and is surrounded by a chain of recently-active volcanoes.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: USGS.


Hurricanes cause estuaries to release trapped carbon dioxide
News & Observer
It's hurricane season, but so far we've been spared from the tropical weather that causes wind damage, flooding and storm surge. Beyond the regular dangers that come with big seasonal storms, a new threat has emerged: "burping estuaries." Why is this a problem? It comes down to a surge of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide suddenly being released into the environment.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Well water may contain earthquake warning signs (Yahoo News)
A journey to the underwater volcanoes where life may have erupted (Nautilus)
Snail shells show high-rise plateau is much lower than it used to be (University of Washington)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Volcanologists: With few telltale signs, Mt. Ontakesan's eruption hard to predict
The Asahi Shimbun
Mount Ontakesan's spectacular eruption on Sept. 27 caught both hikers out for a look at fall colors and volcanologists by surprise, providing little chance for a warning. Many of these volcano geologists say it was a phreatic eruption, a type providing few signs before the upheaval, making it difficult for them to predict.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


These dinosaur-era crabs were just 'eyeballs with legs'
GMA News
Around 435 million years ago, Thylacares brandonensis swam through the seas of the Silurian period, hunting prey with short, spiny limbs and crushing them before devouring them. Named after the Brandon Bridge Formation near Waukesha, Wisconsin where it was found, T. brandonensis is the oldest known ancestor of the thylacocephalans, an extinct species of mysterious and rather bizarre-looking sea creatures from the Jurassic period.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


More evidence that Neanderthals and modern humans overlapped
Medical News Today
In 1908, archeologists digging near the Austrian town of Melk, recovered one of the world's earliest examples of figurative art. This was the Venus of Willendorf, a plump 30,000-year-old statuette. Now another team working at the same site has uncovered stone tools made by modern humans and dated them to 43,500 years ago. The findings reveal that modern humans inhabited cool steppe-like conditions during that period. They also add to the evidence modern humans were in Europe at the same time as Neanderthals, and the overlap between the two is longer than previously thought.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

AIPG eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
View media kit

Jason Zimmerman, Assistant Executive Editor, 469.420.2604   
Contribute news

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the AIPG eNews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Sept. 23, 2014
Sept. 16, 2014
Sept. 9, 2014
Sept. 2, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063