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Events Calendar

AMWA Annual Meeting
The New York
Palace Hotel
New York
March 15-17, 2013


International Congress of the Medical Women's International Assoc.
Seoul, Korea
July 31-Aug. 3, 2013


Honoring the achievements of AMWA members, past and present ...

The assemblage of this pantheon of women leaders in medicine demonstrates a wide variety of experiences and expertise with one uniting them:
The unwavering commitment to make a difference for women, be they physicians or patients.


 



Women in math, science, medicine: Still work to be done
The Huffington Post
In the 1970s and 1980s there was recognition that women were under-represented in careers such as engineering, science, mathematics and medicine. As a result, efforts were made to identify and encourage females who wanted to enter these fields. To an extent, it has worked. But while women account for 32 percent of all physicians, for example, many remain concentrated in fields such as general practice, OB-GYN and oncology. Of the approximately 160,000 surgeons in the United States, only 19 percent are women. And female physicians and surgeons earn 36 percent less than their male counterparts.
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  AMWA News


Congratulations to 2013 award recipients
AMWA
AMWA Board of Directors and Award Committee are pleased to announce the 2013 Award recipients who will be honored during the Saturday, March 16 Awards Luncheon in New York City.

Elizabeth Blackwell Award – Kimberly Templeton, MD

Bertha Van Hoosen Award – Diana Galindo, MD

Anne C. Carter Student Leadership Award – Neha Deshpande

Exceptional Mentor Awards:
Jason Dragoo, MD
Judith Amarosa, MD
Nancy Ascher, MD, PhD
Raghar Govindarajan, MD
Andrea Seratan, MD
Theresa Rohr-Kirchgraber, MD

Please join us in congratulating these recipients for their dedication to the medical profession.

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Join us at AMWA's 98th Anniversary Meeting in New York City in March!

Strategic Success for Women in Medicine
March 15-17
The New York Palace
New York City

This meeting will be the preeminent meeting in the United States for women in medicine. Come and join us for a weekend of education, rejuvenation and reflection at The New York Palace, a stunning five-star hotel in the heart of Manhattan. High-quality CME sessions will keep you abreast of new changes within the field of medicine, with a special focus on gender specific medicine and women's health. You will also gain practical insights regarding medical legal issues, negotiation, career advancement, practice management and career-life balance. There will be abundant opportunities for mentoring and networking. A special dinner cruise along the Hudson River will celebrate AMWA's 98th anniversary in style.

Plenary Keynote — Dr. Nancy Andrews, Dean and Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs Duke University School of Medicine

Special guest speaker — Calvin Trillin, New York Times best-selling author and New Yorker staff writer

Registration will be closing today as the meeting is nearly full. Register now!

For more information, including our list of distinguished faculty, or to register, please visit www.amwa-doc.org/news/amwa-s-98th-annual-meeting-in-new-york-city.


Award-winning author publishes new book on Elizabeth Blackwell, MD
AMWA
Who Says Women Can't Be DOCTORS? The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell
By Tanya Lee Stone
Illustrated by Marjorie Priceman

Though many may know Elizabeth Blackwell by name, few know the details of her unlikely journey to become the first woman doctor in this country. Gifted storyteller, Tanya Stone brings this story to life for children, capturing the grit, perseverance and triumph of the young Elizabeth. More than anything, this book helps break down gender stereotypes and encourages young girls not to be limited by societal expectations. Though women in medicine have come a long way since Blackwell's day, we are reminded that it takes but one individual to open the door for future generations of women to follow.

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  Scholarships & Funding


US cuts could lead to 'brain drain' in medicine
The Baltimore Sun
Scientists at the nation's leading research institutions are warning that continued uncertainty over federal funding could lead to a brain drain that will undermine the country's global status in medicine.
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The Dowd Innovation Seed Fund Fellowship
Carnegie Mellon University
Applications are now being accepting from post-graduate researchers in basic STEM disciplines and information technology through the Carnegie Mellon University Institute of Complex Engineered Systems. Each November four fellowships are awarded to researchers from CMU College of Engineering ICES, based on the merit of their "new idea."
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  Policy & Advocacy


Medical groups warn sequestration will hurt teaching hospitals, research
FierceHealthcare
If Congress doesn't work together prevent the upcoming sequestration, patient care and medical research will be severely jeopardized, the Association of American Medical Colleges, along with more than 40 specialty physician groups, warn in a new report.
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Residency rules: Shift limits dissed
MedPage Today
Program directors who manage interns and residents approve of most of the workload requirements implemented 18 months ago, except for duty-hour restrictions, a survey found. The 549 respondents overwhelmingly approved of one day off each week for residents, direct supervision of first postgraduate year residents, and the 80-hour workweek, according to researchers. Many respondents also liked night-shift frequency of fewer than seven consecutive days, and eight hours' relief between shifts.
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Intensive care MDs: More white coats, fewer piercings preferred
Los Angeles Times
It's not just your mom who's suspicious of body art: Families of patients in intensive care units said that physicians who don't display piercings or tattoos make a better first impression, according to survey results released Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. In intensive care units, the researchers wrote, the stakes are high but patients are unlikely to have a preexisting relationship with their doctors.
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Doctors question routine tests and treatments
Reuters
There are now 135 medical tests, treatments and other procedures — many used for decades — physicians have now identified as almost always unnecessary and often harmful, and which doctors and patients should therefore avoid or at least seriously question.
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Is healthcare ready to change with the times?
By Jonathan Ryan Batson
It is funny how things have changed in such a short span. With the new implementation of the Affordable Care Act, I realize that change — though controversial at times — is necessary to redirect the focus of a nation. Though unpopular at times, it is necessary to change with the times. First off, we need to speak about the increasing amount of new medical schools but no lifting of the cap of residencies in this country. The push for primary care physicians to meet the 2025 demands — despite the shortage of physicians in primary care — and various incentives through the Department of Health and Human Services scholarship for free medical education means a possible insurgence of medical students going into primary care within the next couple of years.
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Industry Pulse: What is the best solution to the shortage of primary care physicians?
answer now


Solving primary care physician shortage by turning PCPs into anesthesiologists
Forbes
Are there really too few primary care physicians? And if so, what can we do to solve the PCP shortage? The standard answer to the first question is "yes, we have too few PCPs." And the standard solution is to train more such docs, or allow more foreign-trained primary care docs into the country or, better yet, simply pay PCPs more money, so that graduating medical students will be more likely to pursue such careers. Article's author has a different set of answers. To the first question, of whether we have a PCP shortage, my answer is: "Maybe yes, but very possibly no."
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Feds outline what insurers must cover, down to polyp removal
Kaiser Health News
The Obama administration has released its final rule on essential health benefits, which sets out what benefits insurers must offer starting in 2014. Insurers must cover 10 broad categories of care, including emergency services, maternity care, hospital and doctors' services, mental health and substance abuse care and prescription drugs.
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Unlikely prescription from doctors: Less is more
Bloomberg Businessweek
A group of medical societies have identified 90 procedures that are "commonly ordered, but which are not always necessary" and are sometimes harmful, according to the announcement from the ABIM Foundation. Among their suggestions: Kids under age 4 shouldn't get cough or cold medicine, doctors shouldn't induce labor for pregnant women before 39 weeks, and patients with advanced dementia should get oral assistance eating rather than feeding tubes.
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Black men lagging behind women, other minorities in medical schools
American Medical News
Black men are notable in that their numbers are lagging even as other minorities and women are continuing a long-term trend of gaining greater representation among medical school applicants and students, according to the most recent Association of American Medical Colleges report on medical education diversity.
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  News in Women's Health


Is evidence-based medicine only an illusion?
MedPage Today
VideoBriefIn a system where half of all clinical trials never see the light of publication, doctors are merely "imagining that we're practicing evidence-based medicine," says Ben Goldacre, MBBS, a British physician and science journalist.
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Key long-term-care insurer to raise women's premiums
Kaiser Health News
Starting next year, the Affordable Care Act will largely prohibit insurers who sell individual and small-group health policies from charging women higher premiums than men for the same coverage. Long-term-care insurance, however, isn't bound by that law, and the country's largest provider of such coverage has announced it will begin setting its prices based on sex this spring.
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USPSTF wants routine HIV screening
MedPage Today
Routine HIV screening — a proposed recommendation by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force — is likely to remove important barriers that leave about 25 percent of HIV-positive people unaware they have the virus. But it would be only the first step in getting all HIV-positive people in the U.S. into care.
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USPSTF Guide to Clinical Preventive Services and Continuing Medical Education Program
AHRQ
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has two new tools available for primary care clinicians. Given your previous engagement with the Task Force, we thought that these resources might be of interest to you and your members. The Task Force's updated 2012 Guide to Clinical Preventive Services is an authoritative source that can help primary care clinicians and patients decide together what preventive services are right for a patient's needs. This edition of the Guide includes the Task Force's evidence-based recommendations on clinical preventive services from 2002 through March 2012, topics in development, background on the USPSTF, and additional resources. It also includes at-a-glance clinical summary tables for ease of use.
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AMWA NewsFlash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
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Feb. 27, 2013: AMWA NewsFlash



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