This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit Apr. 24, 2013

Home   About AMWA   Advocacy  Initiatives   Resources   Member Benefits  Contact  Donate Join  Get Involved      



Events Calendar

International Congress of the Medical Women's International Assoc.
Seoul, Korea
July 31-Aug. 3, 2013


Honoring the achievements of AMWA members, past and present ...




AMWA: Voice of Women in Medicine

Click here to watch a video about AMWA.



AMWA featured: Breakthroughs with Martin Sheen

Click here under "content experts" to watch Breakthroughs.



Support the American Women's Hospitals Service

Click here
to learn more.



 



The impossible workload for doctors in training
The New York Times
Over the past decade, in response to public concerns about medical errors arising from fatigue, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the organization responsible for accrediting American medical residency programs, has been progressively limiting the number of hours that trainees can work. The latest mandate, which took effect in 2011, is the most stringent and deals most specifically with interns. These youngest doctors are allowed to work no longer than 16 hours in a day; and residency programs that violate the restriction risk losing their accreditation.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




AMWA NEWS


News from the Rochester Hills Museum, home of AMWA's founder, Dr. Bertha Van Hoosen
Click here to read the latest Museum Visitor, about recent happenings at the Rochester Hills Museum.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The top 5 things health providers need to know about the ACA
HHS
The Affordable Care Act was signed into law in March 2010. You may have concerns about how ACA will affect you and your practice — your reimbursement, your independence, and the welfare of your patients. You should know that ACA has the potential to bring considerable financial and clinical benefits for providers across the healthcare spectrum.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
See related story: ACA: The healthcare law and you (HHS)


POLICY & ADVOCACY


Work by female scientists gets judged more harshly
Health24
Gender plays a role in how researchers perceive the work of other scientists, according to a new study. Researchers at Ohio State University found that scientific studies written by men were viewed as higher quality than identical studies listing female authors. This gender bias, they noted, is significant and will have important implications over the course of a woman's career in science.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Holistic criteria aid medical schools
The Boston Globe
Medical schools traditionally have accepted students with the highest test scores and best science grades. But in an article published by the New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Robert Witzburg of Boston University School of Medicine writes about what he considers a better approach to choosing future physicians: holistic review.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advocating for women scientists
BU Today
Karen Antman, provost of Boston University's Medical Campus and dean of the School of Medicine, has won the 2013 Margaret L. Kripke Legend Award for Promotion of Women in Cancer Medicine and Cancer Research. The award, which was given by the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, recognizes scientific and medical leaders who have made extraordinary efforts to hire diverse workforces, promote women to leadership roles, nominate women for awards, and help to advance their careers.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Petition: Take the toxic chemicals out of my couch
Green Science Policy Institute
The Green Science Policy Institute is campaigning at the Consumer Product Safety Commission with a petition to "Take the Toxic Chemicals out of my Couch" Please sign this petition and pass it on to your friends. We ask the CPSC to enact a new federal smolder standard for increased fire safety in furniture without flame retardants.

Click here to read and sign the petition.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Grad schools work on diversity
The Daily Pennsylvanian
Administrators agree that while there is still much progress to be made, their efforts to increase the number of underrepresented minority graduate students across the University have been successful. "We work on this a lot," Vice Provost for Education Andrew Binns said in regard to recruitment efforts in Penn's 12 graduate schools. The Perelman School of Medicine has competitive numbers of African-American and Latino students in comparison to other medical schools of its stature in M.D. and M.D.-Ph.D. programs. For these specific programs, the school must follow the Association of American Medical Colleges' definition of who is considered an underrepresented minority.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Female doctors more positive than males (Healthcare Finance News)
Dr. Oz: Why female doctors may be better for you than male doctors (Nerdles)
A visit to the Van Hoosen Farm, home of AMWA's founder, Dr. Bertha Van Hoosen (AMWA, Eliza Chin)
5 ways the president's budget would change Medicare (Kaiser Health News)
Science needs more women (The University of Sydney via Science Alert (commentary))

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


The impending doctor shortage: Do you really need a doctor anymore?
By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan
The fallout and unintended consequences of the Affordable Care Act continues. With so many more people being brought into the "insured" category with the expansion of Medicaid across the country, the very real concern is that there will instantly be a doctor shortage. Since it takes at least seven years to take college graduates and make them fully accredited doctors, the doctor shortage can't be fixed immediately. So how is the U.S. coping with the doctor shortage? Here are a few approaches.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: 'Misdiagnosis' leading cause of US malpractice payouts
HealthDay News
Missed or wrong diagnoses made up the lion's share of U.S. malpractice payouts — which totaled nearly $39 billion — during the past 25 years, finds a new study of more than 350,000 claims.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Flame retardants in consumer products are linked to health, cognitive problems
The Washington Post
Synthetic chemicals added to consumer products to meet federal and state flammability standards are showing up in waterways, wildlife and even human breast milk. Studies in laboratory animals and humans have linked the most scrutinized flame retardants, called polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, to thyroid disruption, memory and learning problems, delayed mental and physical development, lower IQ, advanced puberty and reduced fertility.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
See related story: Green Policy Institute highlights flame retardant danger (PBS)


Docs fight encroachment in turf war with nurses
Modern Healthcare
The campaign to give more primary-care duties to nurse practitioners faces headwinds across the country. Physician groups continue to resist sweeping measures that would expand the allowed scope of practice for licensed nurses with advanced medical training.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Mental muscle: How do medical students remember all that information?
Sioux City Journal
Lizzie Wittrock estimates that she has four stacks of flash cards that are as tall as she is. The white ruled recipe cards contain various medical terms and definitions that the second-semester St. Luke's College-UnityPoint Health nursing student needs to know for quizzes and exams. "I have drawers full," said Wittrock. "I actually started putting them in baskets." For Wittrock repetition is key to remembering medical terminology and concepts, which she likens to learning a "new language."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Judge strikes restrictions on 'morning-after' pill
Reuters
A federal judge has ordered the Food and Drug Administration to make "morning-after" emergency contraception pills available without a prescription to all girls of reproductive age.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Match Day: More medical graduates entering primary care
USA Today
The number of medical students committing to primary care rather than specialties increased for the fourth straight year in the largest "match program" in history, a report says.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Sequester threatens medical education and patient care
Atlanta Business Chronicle
While we don't know the full extent of sequestration's impact, we know that, on a national level, we are facing approximately $85 billion in across-the-board spending cuts for the remaining seven months of fiscal year 2013.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


SCHOLARSHIPS & FUNDING


Funding opportunity: EMPOWERED Community Grants
Empowered
Alicia Keys, as part of the EMPOWERED campaign, is spearheading The EMPOWERED Community Grants Program to help advance community-level efforts focused on women and HIV/AIDS. The grant program will be administered by AIDS United, with guidance from the Kaiser Family Foundation. The Program will provide grants of $10,000 to $25,000 to selected community-based organizations. Grant proposals will be accepted through an annual Request for Proposals process administered by AIDS United. Selections will be made with input from an advisory council of experts. The deadline for submission of grant applications is 11:59 p.m. Eastern, Wednesday, May 15.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "grants."


NEWS IN WOMEN'S HEALTH


Study: Mammograms can measure how breast cancer drug is working
HealthDay News
Mammograms can be used to see how well breast cancer patients are responding to treatment with the drug tamoxifen, a new study suggests.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

AMWA NewsFlash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
Contribute news

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the AMWA NewsFlash was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
April 24, 2013: AMWA NewsFlash



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063