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Events Calendar

International Congress of the Medical Women's International Assoc.
Seoul, Korea
July 31-Aug. 3, 2013


Honoring the achievements of AMWA members, past and present ...




AMWA: Voice of Women in Medicine

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AMWA featured: Breakthroughs with Martin Sheen

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Support the American Women's Hospitals Service

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AMWA supports Oklahoma tornado victims
AMWA
The American Medical Women's Association sends our thoughts and prayers to all those affected by the devastating tornado in Moore, Okla., on Monday, May 20. We hope that many more children are reunited safely with their families and our hearts go out to those who have lost loved ones. We are profoundly saddened by the loss of children due to this horrific natural disaster.
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Primary care docs average more hospital revenue than specialists
HealthLeaders Media
A survey of hospital CFOs shows primary care physicians generated a combined average of $1,566,165 for their affiliated hospitals in the last year. Other specialties generated a combined annual average of $1,424,917, the lowest average in five years, data shows.
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Female orthopedic surgeon defies multiple stereotypes
KTQV-TV
VideoBriefThey are known as the jocks of the operating room and although the majority of surgeons are men, the team of orthopedic surgeons at Billings Clinic is co-ed. "I broke my clavicle one year playing hockey and then I tore my MCL," Dr. Giselle Tan said. "So the only physician I ever saw was an orthopedic surgeon."
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  PASS Program's Revolutionary Process

The goals of the PASS Program go well beyond helping you to merely pass an exam. We want each and every student who participates in the program to actually master medical information. We want your confidence high, and we want your desire to succeed strong.
 


POLICY & ADVOCACY


Tell your senators to support the Peace Corps Equity Act
National Women's Law Center
No woman should ever be denied an abortion, especially in the cases of rape, incest, or when the woman's life is at risk. Period. The Peace Corps is a federal program that sends over 8,000 American volunteers abroad each year to promote world peace and friendship. Women make up more than 60 percent of these volunteers. And though other women who receive healthcare coverage through the federal government have coverage of abortion in cases of rape, incest and to protect the life of the woman, Peace Corps volunteers are prohibited from receiving the same coverage as federal employees. The Peace Corps Equity Act will end this extreme policy.
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Report questions reducing salt intake too dramatically
USA Today
Americans need to lower their excessive salt intake for their health's sake, but it may be harmful to cut back too far, says a new report out today. Adults in the USA consume an average of 3,400 milligrams (about 1 1/2 teaspoons) of sodium a day, mostly from processed foods and restaurant fare.
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Which women should be screened for high cholesterol?
Journal of Women's Health
National guidelines recommend that at-risk women be screened for elevated cholesterol levels to reduce their chances of developing cardiovascular disease. But who is "at risk?" The results of a study by investigators at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to estimate the proportion of women young and old who have cholesterol levels that meet the definition of being at-risk are reported in an article in Journal of Women's Health.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The changing face of medical school admissions (The New York Times)
Financial report: Retirement the top concern for physicians (J. Christopher Burke)
Women's equality agenda allows doctors to be doctors (Buffalo News)
Med school enrollment growth won't ease doc shortage (FierceHealthcare)
AMWA's special 98th anniversary membership promotion (AMWA)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Healthcare data stumbles on 'walls' put up by EMR vendors
VentureBeat
Before health care providers can handle "big data," they first need to learn how to deal with small data. That's the frank assessment of Sean Cassidy, a vice president with Premier Data Alliance, a group purchasing organization that helps coordinate the healthcare provided by 2,800 hospitals, 56,000 nonsurgical healthcare facilities, and 34,000 doctors' offices.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Judge strikes restrictions on 'morning-after' pill
Reuters
A federal judge has ordered the Food and Drug Administration to make "morning-after" emergency contraception pills available without a prescription to all girls of reproductive age.

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Match Day: More medical graduates entering primary care
USA Today
The number of medical students committing to primary care rather than specialties increased for the fourth straight year in the largest "match program" in history, a report says.

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Sequester threatens medical education and patient care
Atlanta Business Chronicle
While we don't know the full extent of sequestration's impact, we know that, on a national level, we are facing approximately $85 billion in across-the-board spending cuts for the remaining seven months of fiscal year 2013.

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NEWS IN WOMEN'S HEALTH


Gene patents drive medical innovation
The Wall Street Journal
The biotech industry began in 1978 when the University of California applied for a patent on the gene for the human growth hormone. Since that filing nearly 20 percent of the 20,000-plus genes in our DNA have been patented. The current Supreme Court case challenging the patent on the breast cancer gene (Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics) could invalidate thousands of these patents, affecting hundreds of diagnostic and therapeutic products.
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Even after overhaul, gaps in coverage for young, pregnant women
NPR
The federal healthcare overhaul makes some notable improvements in insurance coverage for young adults. They can now stay on their parents' health plans until they turn 26. Next year they can also look for subsidized coverage on the state-based insurance marketplaces, also called exchanges. And they may qualify for Medicaid, if their income is less than 138 percent of the federal poverty level.
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Ovarian cancer fall sped up as hormone use dropped
Reuters
Ovarian cancer rates in the U.S. began to decline faster in 2002 around the time many older women went off hormone replacement therapy, according to a new study. That year, the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) found that estrogen or estrogen plus progestin hormone therapy, prescribed for the symptoms of menopause, was linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, stroke and heart attack.
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Winning the war against cervical cancer
Yahoo! News
When President Nixon began the war on cancer in 1971 with the signing of the National Cancer Act, it was intended to "...strengthen the National Cancer Institute in order to more effectively carry out the national effort against cancer." Despite the billions of dollars spent, and a few scattered victories (e.g. childhood leukemia) the casualties continue to mount in this 40 year campaign with no end in sight.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "mastectomy."


USPSTF recommends universal HIV screening from age 15 to 65
OBG Management
The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening all 15- to 65-year olds, younger and older at-risk individuals, and all pregnant women for HIV, according to a Recommendation Statement published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Virginia A. Moyer, MD, MPH, and colleagues from the USPSTF conducted a systematic literature review to update the 2005 recommendation statement on screening for HIV.
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Study: Endometriosis more common in lean women
Reuters
Heavy women are less likely to be diagnosed with endometriosis than their slimmer peers, according to a new study. Researchers following more than 116,000 women found that morbidly obese study participants were 39 percent less likely than normal-weight women to develop the chronic condition - in which uterine tissue grows outside the uterus and causes painful periods and bleeding.
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Study shows that women who smoke during pregnancy increase the risk of both obesity and gestational diabetes
Medical Xpress
While the relation of prenatal tobacco exposure to negative outcomes in childhood has been much studied, reports on possible adverse effects that persist until adulthood are more scarce and results are inconsistent. In the study using data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register, the authors investigated the relationship between a woman smoking in pregnancy and the chances of her daughter then developing gestational diabetes and obesity.
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AMWA NewsFlash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Christine Kraly, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2685   
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