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International Congress of the Medical Women's International Assoc.
Seoul, Korea
July 31-Aug. 3, 2013


Honoring the achievements of AMWA members, past and present ...




AMWA: Voice of Women in Medicine

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AMWA featured: Breakthroughs with Martin Sheen

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AMWA NEWS


AMWA Board — Call for nominations
AMWA
The AMWA Governance Committee is currently accepting nominations for positions of President Elect, Treasurer, and at-large Board of Directors for the 2014-2015. The completed application is due July 1. Click here for more information.
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Interested in Group Coaching with other AMWA members?
AMWA
Women constitute a large and increasing proportion of physicians practicing in this country. As physicians, we struggle with the same challenges as our male colleagues — the increasing patient volume that is straining the doctor-patient relationship, adjusting to electronic health records with the additional time required and demands it places on us, the escalating intrusion of insurance companies into medical decision-making, as well as many other growing stresses in the practice of medicine. Even as our workload mounts and our satisfaction dwindles, in most families, we continue to be the manager of our homes and primary childcare provider.

Click "read more" to learn more.

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AMWA's Special 98th Anniversary Membership Promotion
In honor of AMWA's 98th Anniversary Year, new members can join AMWA at a deeply discounted rate of $98 This is over 50% off of the normal membership rate of $225. Take advantage of this great offer and join our wonderful network of women leaders in medicine. JOIN NOW
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Professor of Epidemiology
Harvard School of Public Health Department of Epidemiology
The Department of Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) invites applications from distinguished scholars for a tenured faculty position as professor of epidemiology.

The successful candidate will provide leadership in expanding the department’s role as a center for clinical epidemiologic research and training. Areas of interest include comparative effectiveness research (CER) and methods development, patient-centered outcomes research, and evidence-based practice. The successful candidate will facilitate departmental engagement in these areas with similar efforts within HSPH, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard teaching hospitals. He or she will be expected to conduct empirical research in clinical epidemiology/CER and to participate actively in teaching and in the direction of training programs in this area.

Candidates should preferably hold a medical degree, as well as graduate-level training in epidemiology or substantial experience with the application or development of epidemiologic methods in clinical research. The ideal candidate will have demonstrated excellence in research, teaching, intellectual leadership, and program development. A strong record of externally funded research is highly desirable.

Please email the following materials by August 30th 2013, and any questions, to the search committee at EPI_SEARCH@hsph.harvard.edu:
• Cover letter
• Curriculum vitae
• Research Statement

The Harvard School of Public Health is committed to increasing the diversity of its faculty and particularly encourages applications from women and minority candidates.


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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  PASS Program's Revolutionary Process

The goals of the PASS Program go well beyond helping you to merely pass an exam. We want each and every student who participates in the program to actually master medical information. We want your confidence high, and we want your desire to succeed strong.
 


AWHS clinic spotlight: Healthcare Network, Inc.
AMWA
As one of American Women's Hospitals Service's supported programs in the U.S., Health Care Network has been leading the Racine County area of Wisconsin in innovative service since 1987. As one of their patients best summed up, “I know times get hard, working with all types of people. But please don’t stop what you are doing. You are raising hope in many cases."
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POLICY & ADVOCACY


Medical school enrollment outpacing available residency slots
AAFP
New survey results released by the Association of American Medical Colleges show that enrollment at U.S. medical schools and schools of osteopathic medicine continues to increase at a steady pace. However, the same survey highlights increasing concern from the nation's medical school deans about insufficient numbers of residency training positions being available to meet matriculating students' graduate medical education needs.
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Appeals courts mull 'Obamacare' contraception mandate
The Washington Times
Business owners who object to the contraception mandate in President Obama's healthcare law are pleading their cases in appeals courts across the country, a curtain raiser before a potential showdown in the Supreme Court. So far, federal circuit courts across the country have diverged on whether religiously devout owners should be exempt from a requirement in the Affordable Care Act that requires them to cover a spectrum of FDA-approved contraceptives as part of their health insurance plans.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "contraception."


Gender differences in access to trauma centers
Medical News Today
Women are less likely than men to receive care in a trauma center after severe injury, according to a new study of almost 100,000 Canadian patients. "Gender-based disparities in access to healthcare services in general have been recognized for some time and evidence is emerging that these disparities extend to the treatment of severe injuries in trauma centers," says lead author Dr. Andrea Hill, a post-doctoral fellow at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto in Ontario, Canada.
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Disability and discrimination at the doctor's office
The New York Times
It's been nearly 23 years since the Americans With Disabilities Act, a federal law prohibiting discrimination against people with disabilities, went into effect. Despite its unequivocal language, studies in recent years have revealed that disabled patients tend not only to be in poorer health, but also to receive inadequate preventive care and to experience worse outcomes.
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NEWS IN WOMEN'S HEALTH


Doctoring in a family way
Los Angeles Times
Jennifer was one of Alison Block's first patients as a new doctor, and she came to see me about an unintended pregnancy. A single mom to a rambunctious 5-year-old girl, Jennifer was struggling economically and battling depression. They talked about the options available to her: continuing the pregnancy and preparing to parent another child, offering the baby for adoption or having an abortion.
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Using a microscope to diagnose, cure disease
The Boston Globe
Cytotechnologist Kelly Flora admits that her last name is a bit serendipitous. As a medical laboratory professional who studies cells and cellular anomalies, one of the diagnosis she gives out is bacterial flora, the proliferation of microorganisms in the body. “When I got married and got my husband’s name, everyone got a good laugh,” said Flora, who is supervisor of the cytology department in the lab at Winchester Hospital.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Female orthopedic surgeon defies multiple stereotypes (KTQV-TV)
Which women should be screened for high cholesterol? (Journal of Women's Health)
Primary care docs average more hospital revenue than specialists (HealthLeaders Media)
Tell your senators to support the Peace Corps Equity Act (National Women's Law Center)
Report questions reducing salt intake too dramatically (USA Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Task force: Screen for gestational diabetes after 24 weeks of pregnancy
Health Day
All women should be screened for gestational diabetes after 24 weeks of pregnancy regardless of whether they have symptoms of the condition, according to a new draft recommendation statement issued by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). The independent panel of national experts also said there is not enough evidence to weigh the benefits and risks of screening for diabetes that develops during pregnancy before 24 weeks.
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Study: Low-income, minority parents moreopen to HPV vaccine for girls
Health Day
Low-income, minority parents have more realistic views about their teens' sexual activity and are more open to vaccinating their daughters against the cervical cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV), a small new study contends. Conversely, white, middle-class parents are more likely to put off vaccination for their daughters, according to researchers from the Boston University School of Medicine.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Focus on quality for patients saves billions of dollars
Intellectual Property Watch
Ten years of progress in treatment have shown that ambitious health targets can be reached, thanks to global advocacy, increased funding for development and critical technical support to developing countries. More than half of the people needing treatment for HIV are receiving it and quality malaria and TB medicines are more readily available.

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Medical school enrollment forecast tempered by residency concerns
HealthLeaders Media
Medical schools will boost enrollment 30 percent by 2017 to ease the nation's physician shortage, but that won't do much good if the federal government won't provide funding to expand residency slots, a new survey of the nation's medical school deans finds.

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5 miracles of Dr. Carol Warfield's $7 million gender bias settlement
Dr. Linda Brodsky
Dr. Carol Warfield, a Harvard doctor and chief of anesthesia at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, was awarded a $7 million settlement for gender discrimination in early February. It was a massive settlement to be sure, certainly one of the largest ever for a gender discrimination case.

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Race, gender of study personnel affect clinical-research participation
Pharma Times
While race and gender are often mentioned as factors complicating efforts to ensure clinical trials are conducted in representative populations, new research suggests that similar distinctions may apply to the personnel managing a clinical study. A team from the University of Cincinnati in Ohio found, for example, that black patients — both male and female — were around 15 percent less likely than white patients to be willing to take part in research when approached by a white male Clinical Study Assistant.
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Study: Breastfeeding may reduce chances of ADHD
The Jerusalem Post
A new study shows that breastfeeding for at least three months may reduce the risk of and even prevent Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The study, appearing in Breastfeeding Medicine, was carried out by an Israeli team on 150 children aged six to 12 years. ADHD is a neurobehavioral disorder characterized by a significant lack of attention or impulsiveness and hyperactivity – or both.
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AMWA NewsFlash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Content Editor, 202.684.7169   
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