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Events Calendar

International Congress of the Medical Women's International Assoc.
Seoul, Korea
July 31-Aug. 3, 2013


Honoring the achievements of AMWA members, past and present ...




AMWA: Voice of Women in Medicine

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AMWA featured: Breakthroughs with Martin Sheen

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AMWA NEWS


AMWA Board - Call for nominations - extended to July 15
The AMWA Governance Committee is currently accepting nominations for positions of President Elect, Treasurer, and at-large Board of Directors for the 2014-2015. The completed application is due July 15. Click here for more information.
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AMWA's special 98th anniversary membership promotion - extended
In honor of AMWA's 98th Anniversary Year, new members can join AMWA at a deeply discounted rate of $98 - extended to Aug. 15. This is over 50 percent off of the normal membership rate of $225. Take advantage of this great offer and join our wonderful network of women leaders in medicine. JOIN NOW
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AWHS Artifact of the Month: House of the Good Neighbor

During World War I, the American Women's Hospitals Service in conjunction with the Red Cross helped to establish a clinic in France for a social services home that helped children and orphans called La Residence Sociale (House of the Good Neighbor). The daily life of La Residence Social (House of the Good Neighbor) was documented in Esther Pohl Lovejoy's first book, The House of the Good Neighbor.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  PASS Program's Revolutionary Process

The goals of the PASS Program go well beyond helping you to merely pass an exam. We want each and every student who participates in the program to actually master medical information. We want your confidence high, and we want your desire to succeed strong.
 


NEWS IN WOMEN'S HEALTH


What does the future of medical education look like? 5 schools offer some clues
MedCity News
Medical schools have been preparing for the changes healthcare reform is bringing. Many have framed their education around iPads and other tablets, and are encouraging more of their students to focus on primary care as physician shortages are expected to worsen. From accelerated programs to a technology focus, the description of some of the innovative approaches proposed to obtain some of the $11 million in grants being offered by the American Medical Association over the next five years offers a window to their thinking about healthcare reform.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "women's health."


Newly insured to deepen primary care doctor gap
The Associated Press via Yahoo News
Getting face time with the family doctor could soon become even harder. A shortage of primary care physicians in some parts of the country is expected to worsen as millions of newly insured Americans gain coverage under the federal healthcare law next year. Doctors could face a backlog, and patients could find it difficult to get quick appointments.
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Medical anthropology: How culture influences the experience of illness
University of Oregon
Kristin Yarris, a new assistant professor of international studies and women's and gender studies, was interviewed recently by Lisa Raleigh of Cascade magazine, regarding a study of rural women in Nicaragua and how they describe physical distress and symptoms of illness.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    US women on the rise as family breadwinner (The New York Times)
Medical students' prognosis unclear with 'Obamacare'; many don't understand law (The Washington Times)
Girls Like Us: Fighting For A World Where Girls Are Not For Sale: A Memoir (AMWA)
Testosterone could combat dementia in women (Health Canal)
Work by female scientists gets judged more harshly (Heath24)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Medical student: The paradox of the doctor-patient relationship
TIME
First-year medical student at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City Laura Fitzpatrick writes: "I watched a birth. More than watched: an hour or so after first meeting the mom-to-be as she lay in her bed in a hospital gown, I was helping her push. I was the one who retrieved her glasses so that she could see her new, perfect baby girl. I might be a footnote in some of the stories she and partner later tells their family about the day their first child entered the world. I'm probably in some of the photos. But it's almost certain that I will never see those new parents or their daughter again."
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For Women in Science Awards winners announced
Harper's Bazaar UK
The annual L'Oreal-UNESCO For Women in Science Awards recently took place at The Royal Society in London. Created more than 15 years ago, the program recognizes the achievements of talented female scientists around the world, awarding them with fellowships to help support their research. This year's winners were experts in the areas of medicine, physics and biochemistry, and will use their money for everything from buying equipment to childcare. Bazaar spoke to the winners to find out who inspired them, and why women make great scientists.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Feds back down on emergency contraception
Ob. Gyn. News
Women and girls of all ages will soon be able to purchase the Plan B One-Step emergency contraceptive pill without a prescription now that the federal government has dropped its legal challenge to making it more easily accessible to minors.

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Study finds leptin is important in women's health
News Fix
The hormone leptin proves to play a role in women’s health and might be used to treat a number of disorders such as bone loss and eating problems. First discovered in 1994, the hormone leptin plays a role in appetite and energy regulation. A team at Harvard Medical...

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Work by female scientists gets judged more harshly
Health24
Gender plays a role in how researchers perceive the work of other scientists, according to a new study. Researchers at Ohio State University found that scientific studies written by men were viewed as higher quality than identical studies listing female authors. This gender...

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More women choose midwives, natural birth
Messenger Post
A number of newborns are coming into the world with a midwife, not a doctor, in attendance, as more women choose what is called the "Midwives Model of Care." Based on the fact that pregnancy and birth are normal life processes, the Midwives Model of Care focuses on providing mothers with individualized education, counseling and prenatal care; continuous hands-on assistance during labor and delivery; and postpartum support. Midwife care minimizes technological interventions, while also identifying and referring women who need obstetrical attention.
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'Nerdy' mold needs breaking to recruit women into computer science
ECN Magazine
The "computer nerd" is a well-known stereotype in our modern society. While this stereotype is inaccurate, it still has a chilling effect on women pursuing a qualification in computer science, according to a new paper. However, when this image is downplayed in the print media, women express more interest in further education in computer science. The work is published online in Springer's journal, Sex Roles.
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Hormone therapy doesn't affect memory
Health24
Women who take hormone therapy for menopause symptoms can expect no change to their memory or other thinking skills, according to new research.
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AAFP calls for halt of student loan interest rate hike
PhysBizTech
As July 1 fast approaches — carrying with it a potentially big bundle of burden for college students in the form of student loan interest rate hikes — professionals across industries are appealing to the United States Congress to reconsider and recourse. In a letter addressed to policymakers, American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) Board chair Glen R. Stream, MD, MBI, FAAFP, noted that the interest hikes would take a system already wrought with struggle to the point of exacerbation.
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AMWA NewsFlash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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June 26, 2013: AMWA NewsFlash



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