This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit Jul. 9, 2013

Home   About AMWA   Advocacy  Initiatives   Resources   Member Benefits  Contact  Donate Join  Get Involved      



Events Calendar

International Congress of the Medical Women's International Assoc.
Seoul, Korea
July 31-Aug. 3, 2013


Honoring the achievements of AMWA members, past and present ...




AMWA: Voice of Women in Medicine

Click here to watch a video about AMWA.



AMWA featured: Breakthroughs with Martin Sheen

Click here under "content experts" to watch Breakthroughs.



Support the American Women's Hospitals Service

Click here
to learn more.



Shop online and support AMWA

Click here to start shopping!



Shop Amazon.com and support AMWA

Click here to start shopping!



 


AMWA NEWS


Spotlight on AMWA's Founder - Dr. Bertha Van Hoosen
Sixty-four years ago, the Associated Press published an article about Dr. Bertha Van Hoosen.
An 86 year old Illinois woman surgeon made the plane for her European vacation today despite a last minute schedule of six operations in a week.

"It never fails to happen," said Dr. Bertha Van Hoosen of Chicago. "Everytime I'm about to go on a trip, they all seem to want to be operated on."

The author of Petticoat Surgeon, Dr. Van Hoosen said she was proud of the increased number of women in the medical profession. She said she herself still operates 'pretty nearly every day.'

Also aboard the plane with Dr. Van Hoosen were Miss Helen Taylor, of Chicago, a portrait painter, and Mrs. Claressa Merritt, of Peoria, Ill., now studying medicine in Philadelphia. Dr. Van Hoosen, who was in attendance at the birth of both women, said: "It is best to travel with people you really know."

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article




AMWA Board - Call for nominations - extended to July 15
The AMWA Governance Committee is currently accepting nominations for positions of President Elect, Treasurer, and at-large Board of Directors for the 2014-2015. The completed application is due July 15. Click here for more information.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


AMWA's special 98th anniversary membership promotion - extended
In honor of AMWA's 98th Anniversary Year, new members can join AMWA at a deeply discounted rate of $98 - extended to Aug. 15. This is over 50 percent off of the normal membership rate of $225. Take advantage of this great offer and join our wonderful network of women leaders in medicine. JOIN NOW
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  PASS Program's Revolutionary Process

The goals of the PASS Program go well beyond helping you to merely pass an exam. We want each and every student who participates in the program to actually master medical information. We want your confidence high, and we want your desire to succeed strong.
 


NEWS IN WOMEN'S HEALTH


Sex and gender women's health collaborative
Biology of Sex Differences
Research conducted to date has deepened our understanding of sex and gender differences in the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes for many conditions that affect both women and men. The Sex and Gender Women’s Health Collaborative (SGWHC) is supported by the coordinated efforts of our founding partners: the American Medical Women’s Association, the American College of Women’s Health Physicians and Society for Women’s Health Research to address the gaps in medical education with regard to sex and gender competency in the care of women.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Epidemic of HPV oropharyngeal cancer
Medscape Today
There has been a rapid rise in the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer associated with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16). "We are clearly seeing an epidemic HPV-related head and neck cancer, and the numbers are rising dramatically," said Dr. Robert Haddad, from the head and neck oncology program at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. Most of the increase in incidence has occurred in the past decade, he told Medscape Medical News in an interview.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New drug for hot flashes may not provide much relief, experts say
The Boston Globe
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new treatment for hot flashes - a low-dose version of the antidepressant paroxetine (Paxil) - in a surprise move. The agency’s panel of physician experts had voted this past March to reject the treatment because the drug didn’t offer enough symptom relief to warrant exposing patients to the risk of rare side effects such as increased suicidal thoughts, bleeding, and high blood pressure.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    House passes bill to help diabetic women; cancer screening money in flux (The Lund Report)
Digital health records' risks emerge as deaths blamed on systems (Bloomberg)
Thomson Reuters survey claims: Gender gap 'muted' (The Huffington Post)
For certain health risks, removing ovaries is medically necessary, not elective, surgery (MedCIty News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Updated ASCO guide on chemoprevention for breast cancer
Medscape Today
In the hope of having more eligible women use chemoprevention for breast cancer, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has changed the tenor of its recommendations in its related clinical practice guideline. The new guideline now more strongly recommends the use of pharmacological prevention interventions for women who are at increased risk for invasive breast cancer.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


State-mandated transvaginal ultrasounds
Forbes
On Friday, July 5, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker signed into law 17 bills that include one, simply called 2013 Wisconsin Act 37, that places new restrictions and conditions on the medical procedure to terminate a pregnancy. In addition to requiring that a large amount of geographically-customized information on pregnancy and adoption services be provided to the patient, the new law requires physicians conducting the procedure to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of their clinic and that an obstetric ultrasound procedure be performed with an oral description provided to the patient of what is seen via the imaging and an opportunity to view the image.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Noninvasive cancer tests offer promise to detect disease earlier
The Huffington Post
"Better late than never" may work with eye exams or finally putting your gym membership to use, but when it comes to diagnosing disease, early is definitely best. In the case of cancer, though, early isn't always an option. Some types have no clear symptoms...

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
US women on the rise as family breadwinner
The New York Times
Women are not only more likely to be the primary caregivers in a family. Increasingly, they are primary breadwinners, too. Four in 10 American households with children under age 18 now include a mother who is either the sole or primary earner for her family, according to...

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
What does the future of medical education look like? 5 schools offer some clues
MedCity News
Medical schools have been preparing for the changes healthcare reform is bringing. Many have framed their education around iPads and other tablets, and are encouraging more of their students to focus on primary care as physician...

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


In Israel, medicine is still a man's world
Haaretz
Prof. Rivka Carmi, president of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and a medical doctor by training, says she became a feminist in the fourth month of pregnancy when she told her supervisor that she couldn’t accept a placement several months down the line because of her impending childbirth. She attributes both her feminist stance and the fact that she would end up with only one daughter to his response. “His reply was: ‘Just know that all your wonderful and ambitious career plans, even if they become fulfilled, won’t reach the extent and quality you intend for them,’” she recalls.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "gender equality."


Women and HIV: A story of racial and ethnic health disparities
Medical Xpress
Overall, the rate of American women contracting the disease relative to men has climbed from 8 percent in the 1980s to 25 percent today. But most of this burden is in underserved communities: one in 32 African-American women will be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime, as will one in 106 Latina women. Meanwhile, one in 526 Caucasian and Asian women will contract the virus. Death rates are also higher for African-American and Latina women, making it one of the leading causes of death for those groups.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Physicians slow to implement HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening guidelines
Science Codex
Recent breakthroughs in cervical cancer prevention have resulted in new vaccination and cervical cancer screening guidelines. Recommendations do not always translate into practice, however. Less than one third of obstetrician-gynecologists vaccinate their eligible patients against the human papilloma virus (HPV), and only half adhere to cervical cancer prevention guidelines published three years previously, according to a survey published this month in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Birth control pills pulled due to placebo issue
MedPage Today
Sandoz is recalling one lot of its Estarylla birth control pills after a patient found a placebo tablet among the pills intended to contain active drug, according to a company press release. The affected tablets, containing norgestimate and ethinyl estradiol, are in lot LF01213A, with an expiration date of February 2014, according to the release, which was posted on the FDA website. The pills are supplied in cartons containing three blister cards of 28 tablets each, and this lot was only distributed in the U.S., a company spokesman said in an email.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

AMWA NewsFlash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
Contribute news

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the AMWA NewsFlash was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
July 9, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063