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Events Calendar

International Congress of the Medical Women's International Assoc.
Seoul, Korea
July 31-Aug. 3, 2013


Honoring the achievements of AMWA members, past and present ...




AMWA: Voice of Women in Medicine

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AMWA featured: Breakthroughs with Martin Sheen

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Support the American Women's Hospitals Service

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AMWA NEWS


Vision 2020 is expanding its delegate family - women leaders needed!
DEADLINE EXTENDED TO AUG. 30.
Women leaders are needed to be National Delegates for Vision 2020, a coalition of organizations and individuals committed to achieve women’s economic and social equality. Delegates are still needed from California, Arizona, Florida, Hawaii, Mississippi, New Hampshire, and Wisconsin. AMWA is a National Ally of Vision 2020 and has been represented at every Congress. For more information, click here.

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A life changing experience in medicine
AMWA
This past summer, through the American Women's Hospitals Service (AWHS), I received a grant that allowed me to travel and have a life changing experience. This grant not merely covered my travel experiences; it forever changed the way I view and practice medicine. For a period of five weeks I worked with the Program de Coordinacion en Salud Integral (PROCOSI) in Bolivia.
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Save the date
AMWA's 99th Anniversary Meeting
Ritz Carlton in Washington, D.C.
March 14-16, 2014

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AMWA HEADLINES
Missed last week's issue? Stay up to date with news from your association.

    AWHS Clinic Spotlight: The Vine Trust
AMWA members invited to join NPA Grand Rounds
Interested in starting an AMWA Branch in your area? Get started in a few easy steps!
An update from the Sex and Gender Women's Health Collaborative, co-founded by AMWA
South Florida AMWA transitions leadership at annual general meeting
End Healthcare Disparities
AMWA's special 98th anniversary membership promotion - extended


NEWS IN WOMEN'S HEALTH


7 surprising health conditions that affect women more than men
The Huffington Post
There are also a slew of health problems are far less likely to be recognized as issues disproportionately impacting women, which means many struggle to get help and answers -- for months and even years at a time. At the top of that list are autoimmune disorders, which occur when the body's immune system attacks itself, and that are far more common in women than in men.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  PASS Program's Revolutionary Process

The goals of the PASS Program go well beyond helping you to merely pass an exam. We want each and every student who participates in the program to actually master medical information. We want your confidence high, and we want your desire to succeed strong.
 


Calcium channel blockers may increase breast cancer risk
Healthline
Antihypertensive drugs used to lower blood pressure have made a huge impact on the lives of millions, and calcium channel blockers are among the most popular of these medications. Though these drugs are lifesavers in one respect, for older women, taking calcium channel blockers may create additional complications.
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Selecting the route for hysterectomy: A structured approach
Contemporary OB/GYN
More than 600,000 hysterectomies are performed in the United States each year. Although recent data have shown an increase in rates of minimally invasive hysterectomy, the majority of hysterectomies continue to be performed through abdominal routes.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
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Rise in mortality risk seen in hysterectomized women aged 50 to 59 not using estrogen therapy
Modern Medicine
A severe decline in the use of estrogen therapy (ET) due to misunderstanding the findings of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Estrogen Plus Progestin Trial has particularly affected hysterectomized women in their 50s, leading to excess mortality, according to a study published online in the American Journal of Public Health.

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The fight over contraception coverage
United Press International
If ever there was a dispute destined to land within the cool marble confines of the U.S. Supreme Court, it's the bitter fight between the Obama administration on one side and the owners of for-profit businesses who say their religious beliefs should exempt them from providing...

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What does the future of medical education look like? 5 schools offer some clues
MedCity News
Medical schools have been preparing for the changes healthcare reform is bringing. Many have framed their education around iPads and other tablets, and are encouraging more of their students to focus on primary care as physician...

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Breastfeeding may lower Alzheimer's risk
Bioscience Technology
Mothers who breastfeed their children may have a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease, with longer periods of breastfeeding also lowering the overall risk, a new study suggests. The report, newly published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, suggests that the link may be to do with certain biological effects of breastfeeding.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "breastfeeding."


Women's health coalition worries state plan falls short
The Texas Tribune
State Sen. Jane Nelson, R-Flower Mound, has responded to the Texas Women’s Healthcare Coalition’s concerns that the state’s $100 million expansion of a primary care program would not meet lawmakers' intent of restoring access to family planning services.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The global plan: Working to improve women's health (The Huffington Post (opinion))
Should women consider taking testosterone? (The Huffington Post)
Are women receiving proper treatment for HPV and cervical cancer? (By Jessica Taylor)
AMWA members invited to join NPA Grand Rounds (NPA via AMWA)
Growing uncertainty about breast cancer screening (Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


No link observed between fertility treatment, long-term cardiovascular disease risk
Healio
Potential linkage between fertility treatment and long-term CVD has been a topic of interest because more women are delaying pregnancy until older age, and fertility medications can increase risk for maternal metabolic syndromes, Dr. Jacob A. Udell, MPH, FRCPC, and colleagues wrote in the study background.
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Contraception and corporations
The New York Times (opinion)
At least three dozen lawsuits have been filed by private businesses challenging, on religious grounds, the new healthcare law’s requirement that most company health plans provide no-cost coverage of contraceptives.
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Some blood pressure drugs may raise breast cancer risk
Fox News
Researchers found women in the study who had been taking calcium-channel blockers to treat high blood pressure for more than 10 years were 2.5 times more likely to have breast cancer, compared with women who did not use blood pressure medication, or who used other types.
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AMWA NewsFlash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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August 7, 2013



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