This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit Aug. 14, 2013

Home   About AMWA   Advocacy  Initiatives   Resources   Member Benefits  Contact  Donate Join  Get Involved      



Events Calendar

International Congress of the Medical Women's International Assoc.
Seoul, Korea
July 31-Aug. 3, 2013


Honoring the achievements of AMWA members, past and present ...




AMWA: Voice of Women in Medicine

Click here to watch a video about AMWA.



AMWA featured: Breakthroughs with Martin Sheen

Click here under "content experts" to watch Breakthroughs.



Support the American Women's Hospitals Service

Click here
to learn more.



Shop online and support AMWA

Click here to start shopping!



Shop Amazon.com and support AMWA

Click here to start shopping!



 


AMWA NEWS


AMWA's special 98th anniversary membership promotion - extended until Sept. 30 in honor of September Women in Medicine month.
In honor of AMWA's 98th Anniversary Year, new members can join AMWA at a deeply discounted rate of $98.This is over 50 percent off of the normal membership rate of $225.
For residents, please take advantage of the $50 membership.
Take advantage of this great offer and join our wonderful network of women leaders in medicine. JOIN NOW

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


AMWA and J. Brandt Sterling Silver Pin available for purchase
To order your pin, click here.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Book club author event
AMWA members are cordially invited to a Skype chat with author and abuse survivor, Rachel Lloyd, who provides insights into the hidden world of child sex trafficking. Her book, Girls Like Us: Fighting for a World Where Girls Are Not for Sale, an Activist Finds Her Calling and Heals Herself, was chosen by AMWA's Resident Division for their book club. For more information, please visit http://www.amwa-doc.org/news/T726.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Save the date
AMWA's 99th Anniversary Meeting
Ritz Carlton in Washington, D.C.
March 14-16, 2014

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


AMWA HEADLINES
Missed last week's issue? Stay up to date with news from your association.

    Vision 2020 is expanding its delegate family - DEADLINE EXTENDED TO AUG. 30.
A life changing experience in medicine
AWHS Clinic Spotlight: The Vine Trust
AMWA members invited to join NPA Grand Rounds
Interested in starting an AMWA Branch in your area? Get started in a few easy steps!
An update from the Sex and Gender Women's Health Collaborative, co-founded by AMWA
South Florida AMWA transitions leadership at annual general meeting
End Healthcare Disparities


NEWS IN WOMEN'S HEALTH


Individualized breast cancer screening catches more cancer
Medical Xpress
A breast cancer screening program tailored to participants' individual risk profiles has a higher-than-expected breast cancer detection rate in 40- to 49-year old women, according to a pilot study published in the August issue of Radiology.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  PASS Program's Revolutionary Process

The goals of the PASS Program go well beyond helping you to merely pass an exam. We want each and every student who participates in the program to actually master medical information. We want your confidence high, and we want your desire to succeed strong.
 


Study finds link between induced labor and autism diagnoses
The Wall Street Journal
Pregnant women who have procedures to induce or encourage labor might have an increased risk of bearing a child with autism, according to a new study. Researchers at Duke University and the University of Michigan who conducted the study, published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, said it doesn't prove that induced and/or augmented labor causes autism.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
New abortion limits, but more money for women's health
The Texas Tribune
When Anastasia Tolmasoff went to a Planned Parenthood clinic in March to receive her quarterly injection of Depo-Provera, she discovered she could no longer afford to receive birth control there. “I’m living paycheck to paycheck, so getting pregnant and having another child is not an option for me,” said Tolmasoff.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
7 surprising health conditions that affect women more than men
The Huffington Post
There are also a slew of health problems are far less likely to be recognized as issues disproportionately impacting women, which means many struggle to get help and answers -- for months and even years at a time. At the top of that list...

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
What does the future of medical education look like? 5 schools offer some clues
MedCity News
Medical schools have been preparing for the changes healthcare reform is bringing. Many have framed their education around iPads and other tablets, and are encouraging more of their students to focus on primary care as physician...

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


New prenatal Harmony Test can help expecting mothers detect birth defects
Fox News
“In every pregnant woman, there’s a small amount of DNA from the fetus circulating in her body,” Dr. Ron Wapner told FoxNews.com. “Now, it doesn’t come directly from the fetus. It’s cells that have kind of shaved off the placenta. So what the test does is it can analyze both the mother’s DNA, but it can also analyze the DNA from the fetus, and use that to make a prenatal diagnosis.”
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Women conceive naturally after IVF
Medical Xpress
One in three women who have their first baby through infertility treatment, become pregnant again naturally within two years of their first birth, a new study has found. A Monash University study, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, was the first to examine the rates of unexpected conception in Australian women who had a first child through assisted reproductive technology (ART).
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    7 surprising health conditions that affect women more than men (The Huffington Post)
A life changing experience in medicine (AMWA)
Calcium channel blockers may increase breast cancer risk (Healthline)
Selecting the route for hysterectomy: A structured approach (Contemporary OB/GYN)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Breastfeeding tied to reduced child obesity
Drug Information Online
Breast-feeding may reduce children's risk of being overweight or obese, a large new study from Japan found. Researchers looked at more than 43,000 children, aged 7 and 8, with records of how they were fed during infancy.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "breastfeeding."


Women in urban areas show high rates of postpartum depression
redOrbit
Women living in large urban areas are at a significantly higher risk of postpartum depression after five to 14 months of giving birth compared to those living in rural areas, according to a new Canadian study led by Women’s College Hospital’s Dr. Simone Vigod. The study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, strongly links geographic location and postpartum depression.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Why early pregnancy confers breast cancer protection
Science Codex
An international scientific collaborative led by the Harvard Stem Cell Institute's Dr. Kornelia Polyak, Ph.D., has discovered why women who give birth in their early twenties are less likely to eventually develop breast cancer than women who don't, triggering a search for a way to confer this protective state on all women.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Eating fish may be tied to lower rheumatoid arthritis risk
Health Day
Women who regularly get some fish in their diet may have a relatively lower risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, a large new study suggests. Swedish researchers found that of the 32,000-plus women they followed for nearly eight years, those who ate fish at least once a week were 29 percent less likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis than other women were.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Women's healthcare access in steady decline
The Austin Chronicle
As expected, the state-funded Texas Women's Health Program – designed to preclude women from obtaining services from Planned Parenthood – has at midyear served significantly fewer women than were served by the previous program, which was funded by the federal government and included Planned Parenthood.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

AMWA NewsFlash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
Contribute news

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the AMWA NewsFlash was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
August 14, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063