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AMWA: Voice of Women in Medicine

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AMWA teleseminar: 3 simple steps to greater work-life balance
Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, 8 p.m. Eastern, 5 p.m. Pacific. Sign up here.
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AMWA NEWS

September is 'Women in Medicine Month'
This year’s theme is Women in Medicine: Empowering Leaders to Improve the Health of Women
Get involved with AMWA to help in these areas:
  • Promote gender specific medicine in medical education
  • Provide patient and provider education on women's health topics
  • Improve healthcare awareness and education on human trafficking
  • For more information, e-mail associatedirector@amwa-doc.org.

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    Follow @AMWADoctors and stay tuned!
    The AMWA Social Media Committee would like to introduce our new Twitter Monday series entitled "Women & Medicine Mondays" (searchable on Twitter.com with #WNMonday). We will be tweeting interesting, thought-provoking, and inspiring stories related to women's health and women in the healthcare industry every Monday. Follow us at @AMWADoctors and stay tuned!
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    AMWA HEADLINES
    Missed last week's issue? Stay up to date with news from your association.

        What doctors feel: How emotions affect the practice of medicine
    In memory of Dr. Doris Bartuska (1929-2013)


    NEWS IN WOMEN'S HEALTH


    More women are suiting-up in surgical careers, but is it a challenge?
    Healthcare Global
    Although women are increasingly making their mark in the field of surgery, very few of them have managed to move into leadership positions. Some women surgeons believe that gender discrimination still exists in the field. Certain surgical specialties, such as neurological surgery and orthopedic surgery, remain very male-dominated, with men accounting for about 95 percent of all practicing surgeons.
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    New hope for ovarian cancer
    By Dorothy L. Tengler
    Despite advances in treatment, ovarian cancer remains a highly lethal disease, mainly because most women with ovarian cancer are diagnosed when the disease is at a late stage. Every year, about 20,000 women get ovarian cancer, the eighth most common cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer death. When ovarian cancer is found in its early stages, treatment is most effective.
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    Robotic hysterectomy usage up for benign disease
    Medical Xpress via HealthDay News
    The use of robotic hysterectomy procedures has significantly increased, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in Obstetrics & Gynecology. The researchers found that there were 804,551 hysterectomies performed for benign conditions, of which 20.6 percent were laparoscopic and 5.1 percent were robotically assisted.
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    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "menopause."

    Stats show MRSA declining, especially in hospitals
    Ob. Gyn, News
    The estimated total of invasive MRSA infections across the United States fell 31 percent between 2005 and 2011, according to a report published online Sept. 16 in JAMA Internal Medicine. And for the first time, the estimated number of hospital-onset invasive MRSA infections was lower than that of community-associated infections, said Dr. Raymund Dantes.
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    PRODUCT SHOWCASE
      PASS Program's Revolutionary Process

    The goals of the PASS Program go well beyond helping you to merely pass an exam. We want each and every student who participates in the program to actually master medical information. We want your confidence high, and we want your desire to succeed strong.
     


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    Female physicians earn $56 thousand less per year than males
    Medical Economics
    Although significant gains have been made in closing the wage gap between men and women, a recent study suggests that female physicians still earn significantly less than their male counterparts. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), found that between 1987-1990, male physicians earned $33,840 (20%) more than females.

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    7 surprising health conditions that affect women more than men
    The Huffington Post
    There are also a slew of health problems are far less likely to be recognized as issues disproportionately impacting women, which means many struggle to get help and answers -- for months and even years at a time. At the top of that list...

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    What does the future of medical education look like? 5 schools offer some clues
    MedCity News
    Medical schools have been preparing for the changes healthcare reform is bringing. Many have framed their education around iPads and other tablets, and are encouraging more of their students to focus on primary care as physician...

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    Women's heart attacks may hit without chest pain
    Everyday Health
    Sex differences matter in spotting and treating a heart attack, according to a new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine, from Nadia Khan, M.D., MSc and researchers at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, Canada. Women have the classic chest pain we look for to identify a heart attack less often than men, the investigators reported.
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    6 things you need to know about women, aging and brain health
    The Huffington Post
    Americans are living longer than ever, and women tend outlive men: The average life expectancy for females in the United States is now roughly 81, compared to 76 for males, according to recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates. As a result, women are disproportionately affected by many of the health issues associated with brain aging.
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    Breast cancer research sheds light on earlier screening
    WMBB-TV
    New cancer research shows that most breast cancer deaths occur in younger women who've not had screening mammograms. In 2009, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended screening mammograms at the age of 50, every two years. However, The American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammograms beginning at age 40. This has continued to be a debate among industry experts.
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    Study: Asthma care critical during pregnancy
    U.S. News & World Report via HealthDay News
    Asthma control during pregnancy is vital because uncontrolled asthma can cause harm to mothers and their babies, according to a new review. Asthma affects about 10 percent of pregnant women, making it the most common chronic condition in pregnancy, the researchers said.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Estrogen activation plays role in memory (Science World Report)
    What doctors feel: How emotions affect the practice of medicine (By Dr. Danielle Ofri)
    7 surprising health conditions that affect women more than men (The Huffington Post)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


     

    AMWA NewsFlash
    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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