Sidelines
Oct. 22, 2014

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month
By Dr. Rebecca Rodriguez, AOASM











Currently, most people and professional organizations have joined in with the commercialization of wearing PINK. But as physicians, do we really know how these trends got started and understand the significance of breast cancer detection guidelines, the exam, and breast self awareness?

Breast Cancer Awareness is an annual campaign to increase awareness of the disease. While most people are aware of breast cancer, many forget to prepare and have a plan to detect the disease in its early stages. Breast cancer is one of the leading health crises for women in the United States. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. There is currently no known cure for breast cancer, and its early diagnosis is critical to survival.

The National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF) was founded in 1991 by breast cancer survivor, Janelle Hail. Hail was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1980 at the age of 34 and at the time of her diagnosis, there was little information about the disease. She was forced to make a decision about her health with few options and resources. After her treatment, Hail made a commitment to help women around the world by educating them about breast cancer and the importance of early detection.

NBCF's mission is to help women by providing education and support services to those affected by breast cancer through early detection. According to The National Cancer Institute (NCI), getting a high-quality mammogram and having a clinical breast exam on a regular basis are the most effective ways to detect breast cancer early. The National Cancer Institute recommends women age 40 and older receive annual mammogram screenings to provide early detection of breast cancer. 
The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) recommends a clinical breast exam for women aged 29–39 every one to three years. Women aged 40 years and older should have a clinical breast exam every year.More

Congratulations to the 2014 AOASM Sports Medicine Fellows
By the AOASM Membership Committee
Ed Kornoelje, DO, FAOASM
AOASM Membership Committee Chair

Members of the Membership Committee
Mike Messmer, DO, CAQSM
J.A. Smith, DO, CAQSM
Anne Rex, DO, FAOASM


The AOASM Membership Committee would like to extend a special congratulations and welcome to our recent Sports Medicine Fellowship graduates.

Dr. Brian Abbott MetroHealth Sports Medicine Primary Care Fellowship
Dr. Moha Ahuja Overlook Hospital - AHS
Dr. Oluwaseye Alabi Larkin Community Hospital, Sports Medicine
Dr. Gabriel Betancourt NSUCOM/NOVA
Dr. Dwan Perry Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine VCOM
Dr. Sadiya Farooqui Inspira Health Network
Dr. Bradley Goldstein NSUCOM/NOVA
Dr. Diara Gross North Shore University Hospital at Plainview/NY COM
Dr. Tye Harrison Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine VCOM
Dr. Jessica Huerta LECOM Sports/Millcreek Community Hospital
Dr. Matthew Jackson MSUCOM/Wildwood - Toledo Hospital
Dr. Vanessa Lalley-Demong NSUCOM/NOVA
Dr. Alexandra Myers San Diego Sports Medicine
Dr. Allison Nichol MSUCOM/Wildwood - Toledo Hospital
Dr. Christopher Rial LECOM Sports/Millcreek Community Hospital
Dr. Travis Smith Cleveland Clinic - Southe Point
Dr. Andrew Teffeau Larkin Community Hospital, Sports Medicine
Dr. Gregor Thebaud Pinnacle Health System
Dr. Jennifer Trpkovski Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine VCOM
Dr. Matt Weirath Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine VCOM
Dr. Aaron Wolkoff Cleveland Clinic - Southe Point

As graduates of a Sports Medicine Fellowship, you have now entered into a fraternity that, while small, has a proud and rich history extending more than thirty years! We at the AOASM would like to challenge you to remain a strong member of the organization and actively participate in the growth and stability of our academy.

Speaking as fellow Sports Medicine Physicians, we can tell you that this field is one of the most rewarding in medicine. You will have opportunities to stay at the cutting edge of sports and primary care medicine. You will be one of a rare group of physicians with an ability to engrain himself/herself into the community, with an ability to have a real influence through the event coverage that you provide.

All of us at the AOASM would like you to know that we are here for you, and would like to be considered your primary source for updates and education throughout your career.

We wish you the best and feel free to contact any one of us for advice or assistance. More

Update from the AOA: What you should know about Ebola
AOASM
The Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) are working with U.S. government agencies, the World Health Organization and other domestic and international partners in an international response to the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

The CDC and ASPR are giving all physicians access to guides, checklists and webinars to keep them informed on key messages about the outbreak. These resources will provide you with information on detecting the signs and symptoms of Ebola, protecting others from being infected and developing a response plan.

Start by reading an open letter to all U.S. healthcare professionals from Dr. Nicole Lurie, the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, regarding the current Ebola situation. You may also be interested in a recent webinar on Ebola preparedness for the U.S. healthcare system. The webinar focuses on the detailed hospital checklist for Ebola preparedness, which provides practical and specific suggestions to ensure hospitals can detect possible Ebola cases, protect their employees and respond appropriately. See a full list of resources on osteopathic.org.

Visit the CDC Ebola website for the most updated information on the 2014 Ebola response. More

The impact of sex and knee injury history on jump-landing patterns in collegiate athletes: A clinical evaluation
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine
An interaction effect was reported for trunk flexion at initial ground contact. Main effects for sex indicated that males demonstrated more at-risk landing movement patterns on the sagittal plane (ie, limited trunk, knee and hip flexion at initial contact, and limited hip flexion throughout the landing), whereas females demonstrated more at-risk landing movement patterns on the frontal plane (ie, knee valgus at initial ground contact and maximum knee flexion, and more frontal plane movement throughout the landing).More

Athlete health and safety in rowing: Editorial by the FISA (rowing) Sports Medicine Commission
British Journal of Sports Medicine
The FISA Sports Medicine Commission advises the FISA Council and member federations on rowing-related sports medicine issues. Rowing has been part of the Olympic programme since 1896; women's rowing was introduced as an Olympic sport in 1976 and the lightweight category was included in 1996. More

Update from the AOA: What you should know about Ebola
AOASM
The Department of Health and Human Services' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) are working with U.S. government agencies, the World Health Organization, and other domestic and international partners in an international response to the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

The CDC and ASPR are giving all physicians access to guides, checklists and webinars to keep them informed on key messages about the outbreak. These resources will provide you with information on detecting the signs and symptoms of Ebola, protecting others from being infected, and developing a response plan.

Start by reading an open letter to all U.S. health care professionals from Dr. Nicole Lurie, the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, regarding the current Ebola situation. You may also be interested in a recent webinar on Ebola preparedness for the U.S. health care system. The webinar focuses on the Detailed Hospital Checklist for Ebola Preparedness, which provides practical and specific suggestions to ensure hospitals can detect possible Ebola cases, protect their employees, and respond appropriately. See a full list of resources on Osteopathic.org.

Visit the CDC Ebola website for the most updated information on the 2014 Ebola response.More

Athletic trainers' group advises heart tests for young athletes
HealthDay News
Young athletes should undergo heart screening before they play competitive sports, according to new guidelines released by the National Athletic Trainers' Association. The goal of the guidelines for secondary schools is to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in athletes. Sudden cardiac arrest is often caused by an undetected structural abnormality of the heart, according to a NATA news release.More

Measuring on ice: Researchers create 'smart' ice skating blade
ScienceDaily
An ice skating blade that informs figure skaters of the stresses they are imposing on their joints has been developed by a group of researchers in the U.S. The small, lightweight device has been built to measure the force that a figure skater exerts on the ice when performing their repertoire of jumps and spins and could potentially be used by skaters and their trainers to avoid injuries, as well as inform the design of new skating boots.More

Young baseball pitchers at risk for shoulder damage
Reuters
Teenaged baseball players who throw more than 100 pitches per week are at heightened risk of an injury that could permanently mar normal shoulder development, says a new study. The injury, dubbed "acromial apophysiolysis" by the authors, is characterized by incomplete fusion of the bones that form the top portion of the shoulder joint, the acromion, and local swelling and fluid (edema). More