Field Notes
May. 14, 2015

APGO's 13th Annual General Meeting
APGO
On behalf of the Council of the Association of Professional Geoscientists of Ontario, we are extending an invitation to our members to come to our 13th Annual General Meeting that will take place on June 11, 2015 at One King West Hotel in Toronto. The AGM will start at 3:30 p.m. and will be followed by a reception at 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Amy Pressman, Partner at Davies LLP is our guest speaker. Amy will be speaking on "More to Know for Those in the Know: Legal Developments in Expert Evidence in Ontario." Register now!

APGO gratefully acknowledges the generous support of TD Insurance Meloche Monnex for being the sponsor of this year's Reception following the Annual General Meeting. More

2015 APGO Photo Contest
APGO
APGO looks to its membership for photos to use in displays, brochures, newsletters, Facebook and presentations to enhance the public's appreciation for geoscience. We're looking for great photos that showcase the different facets of the geoscience profession. Share your story. Submit a picture. All entries must be received at the APGO office no later than May 29, 2015. Photos must be submitted by email to bkradjian@apgo.net. Before we can use your material, we need to obtain your permission. The following is an example of a statement that can be used in your email body when submitting your photo:

"I (name), give permission to the Association of Professional Geoscientists of Ontario (APGO) to use the material(s) attached to this email as it sees fit and I release APGO from any obligation to me with respect to the attached material(s)." More

2015 Compensation and Benefits Study
APGO
As APGO members have already been notified, the 2015 Compensation and Benefits Study from InfoFeedback.com was emailed on Wednesday, May 6. This study is specific to the geoscience sector. APGO encourages members who have not received the online survey to check their spam folders for info@infofeedback.com. Email info@infofeedback.com if you still cannot find the survey.More

The Ontario Chamber of Commerce adopts resolution from Timmins calling for lobbying effort to prevent Mining Tax increases
Timmins Press
The Timmins Chamber of Commerce has convinced its fellow chambers across the province to fight against any initiative to increase Mining Tax rates in Ontario. The local chamber proposed a resolution calling for lobbying efforts against any such tax increases, which was adopted at the Ontario Chamber of Commerce's annual general meeting in Cornwall recently. The Ontario chamber will now try to use its influence to convince the provincial government not to reopen the idea of raising taxes on mining operations in Ontario. More

Mining companies to face more transparency
CBC News
Canadian-owned oil, gas and mining companies must begin reporting next year all payments of more than $100,000 for government services, including port fees and royalties, beginning a new era of transparency in the mining sector. The federal government's new Extractive Measures Transparency Act will give Canada similar legislation to what exists in the U.K. and the U.S.More

SAS core comes up gold in all directions at Holt and Holloway
Canadian Mining Journal
St. Andrew Goldfields (SAS) is enjoying exceptional drilling results wherever they drill in the Holt-Holloway area 45 kilometres northeast of Kirkland Lake. Mineralization has been extended north of Holt zone 4, east of Holloway Smoke Deep zone, and below the existing Mattawasaga pits. Here are the highlights.More

Report: Base metal mines 2.5 times more costly in far north
Northern Ontario Business
It came as no surprise to the Mining Association of Canada (MAC) that it's more expensive to mine in the far north than in the south, but thanks to a new report, the association has quantified that difference. "In the case of base metals, or gold mines, the difference is really significant," said Pierre Gratton, MAC president and CEO. In its report, called Levelling the Playing Field, the association found the capital costs for base metal mines are, on average, 2.5 times higher in the Far North.More

Mine rescue teams from district converge on Timmins
Timmins Press
It's Ontario Mine Rescue competition time in Timmins. Mine rescue teams from Timmins and Kirkland Lake will be taking part in a double district competition. Two of the North's best-known mining communities will be holding their annual district events at the McIntyre Arena with four teams competing for the Timmins district title and four teams vying for the Kirkland Lake district title.More

To find underground water, researchers take to the sky
Alaska Highway News
To learn more about water hidden beneath the earth, researchers are taking to the clouds. This summer, a team of scientists backed by industry, First Nations and government will survey nearly 9,000 square kilometers of North Peace, B.C., back-country from the air. A helicopter flying at 100 metres will buzz over a rectangular area stretching from north of Pink Mountain to Hudson's Hope. On a long line, the helicopter will carry a specialized array called a magnetometer that emits a magnetic field to find buried aquifers and river channels.More

Watch a mysterious lake disappear down a hole
National Geographic
A placid mountain lake in central Oregon lives up to its name, Lost Lake, by disappearing every spring. This year, video capturing the annual phenomenon has gone viral. As the video shows, Lost Lake drains rapidly through a six-foot wide hole in the lake's bottom, morphing into a quiet meadow in late spring. Early in the following spring, the lake fills up again, as snow-melt from the surrounding Cascade mountains accumulates faster than water can drain out through the hole.More

Why saline sinkholes are swallowing the Dead Sea
Toronto Star
The Dead Sea is slowly dying. Named for its absence of aquatic life due to a high concentration of salt, the lake — between Israel, Jordan and the Palestinian territories — is suffering a different kind of mortality as more than 3,000 sinkholes are swallowing up its shores. The mismanagement of water resources has resulted in gaping craters, some that could swallow an eight-storey building. More