This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit April 30, 2015

Home   About Us   Event Calendar   Job Postings   Contact Us  

 


 Association News

So what does the P. Geo. brand mean, anyway? My thoughts on professionalism
David S. Hunt, P. Geo., President
During my year as President, a lot of members have told me what they think about APGO, and one thing that seems to really confuse people is how the role of being a professional meshes with the role of being a geoscientist. For the first 30 years of my career, I was a mere geologist. I was trained in university to be a scientist, not a professional. Students today are still trained to be scientists rather than professionals, and now that we are a regulated profession, I see this as a problem. But that's a different story.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


 In the Media


Disclaimer: The media articles featured in Field Notes do not express or reflect the opinions of the Association of Professional Geoscientists of Ontario, or any employee thereof.


Feds budget for high-tech mining, Aboriginal training
Northern Ontario Business
There wasn't a billion dollar Ring of Fire payday for Ontario in the federal budget, but Ottawa is willing to fund some of the technological challenges, exploration know-how and training requirements to support the idled Far North mineral play. Ottawa is setting aside $23 million over five years to advance new technology for separating and processing rare earth metals and for "green processing technologies" to limit the environmental impact of mining chromite in the Ring of Fire.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


What to expect from Canada's base metals producers this earnings season
The Globe and Mail
This report presents our updated Q1 estimates for the major base metals producers in our coverage universe. There are no ratings or target price changes, but we have made some revisions to some of our forecasts.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Mine safety review should be a regular thing
Timmins Times
Ontario's mining industry is one of the safest in the world, but there is still room for improvement. That statement forms part of the newly tabled final report on Mining, Health, Safety and Prevention review, which was released recently. The review, which held hearings in Timmins, was ordered by the Ontario government, back in 2013, in response to mining deaths that had happened in the previous two years.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Prairie Lake earns Discovery of the Year in Northwestern Ontario
Canadian Mining Journal
MDN is pleased to announced that Rudy Wahl, one of the owners of the recently optioned property Prairie Lake, received the Bernie Schnieders Discovery of the Year award for Prairie Lake, by the Northwestern Ontario Prospectors Association. The award recognizes an exceptional discovery in Northwestern Ontario during the previous calendar year and it was recently presented to Rudy Wahl at the NWOPA Awards Dinner in Thunder Bay.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
 
Geophysics GPR International Inc.

Geophysical techniques can provide key insights to hydrogeological studies allowing for focused drilling. Geophysics GPR has employed seismic surveys to identified bedrock paleochannels and fracture zones leading to successful water sources at numerous sites.
Once drilled, Geophysics GPR's experience in borehole logging can optimize the screening and well design.

New Website “Sneak Peek”
 


Local 6500, Vale reach deal
Sudbury Star
United Steelworkers Locals 6500 in Sudbury and Local 6200 in Port Colborne and employer Vale have reached a tentative deal on a five-year contract for production and maintenance workers. Members of the union's bargaining committee are unanimously recommending the deal be accepted at membership meetings. News of the deal comes ahead of the expiry date of the current five-year contract.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Mining company withdraws application
North Bay Nugget
Aecon Mining has withdrawn its application for an exploration permit for La Vase Portages in response to opposition to the project, The Nugget has learned. According to an email from Don Fudge of Fudge and Associates to Suzanne Halet of the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines, "given the opposition to our proposed exploration program, I am withdrawing the application. We will not proceed with the program." Fudge told The Nugget the application was for an exploration permit to acquire several kilograms of rock for analysis.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
 
Eastern Soil Investigation Limited

Our service, quality and knowledge has made us a leader in the industry. We pride ourselves on our abilities to both complete all jobs and communicate professionally with all clients and their representatives.

 


Barrick to sell part of Chilean mine in retreat from copper
The Globe and Mail
Barrick Gold plans to sell part of its prized Chilean copper mine, in a move to reduce its $13 billion debt burden. The partial sale of Zalidvar will crimp Barrick's cash flow at a time when it is dealing with a slump in copper and gold prices. But Zaldivar, which used to be called the Andean ATM because it generated so much cash, is expected to attract top bids and help Barrick strengthen its finances under a revitalization plan laid out by chairman John Thornton.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


How cracking explains underwater volcanoes and the Hawaiian bend
Science Daily
University of Sydney geoscientists have helped prove that some of the ocean's underwater volcanoes did not erupt from hot spots in Earth's mantle but instead formed from cracks or fractures in the oceanic crust. The discovery helps explain the spectacular bend in the famous underwater range, the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain, where the bottom half kinks at a 60° angle to the east of its top half.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Teck starting exploration on Timmins property
Northern Ontario Business
Teck Resources has started exploration work on Explor Resources' Timmins Porcupine West property. Teck has the option of earning up to a 70 per cent interest on the property from Explor. Teck is currently conducting short-wave infrared instrument scan analyses on existing core to assist in mapping of alteration patterns and vectors to assist with diamond drill-hole targeting.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Ontario government funds graphite research for Zenyatta
Northern Miner
The Ontario government is spending $500,000 to help Thunder Bay-based graphite explorer Zenyatta Ventures test samples from its Albany project near the town of Hearst. Zenyatta will use the grant for laboratory work to see if there is enough high-purity graphite at Albany to support large-scale mining. SGS is doing the testing. The money comes from the Northern Ontario Heritage Fund.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Sudbury company turning tailings into cash
Northern Life
To the untrained eye, a visit to Kovit Engineering's lab in Sudbury looks like a number of adults playing with combinations of sand, silt and water. On the surface, the lab might have a lot in common with a child's playground, and the wide-eyed experimentation that comes with getting one's hands dirty. But to Frank Palkovits, one of Kovit Engineering's four co-owners, what goes on in the 3,500-square-foot laboratory is serious business.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Scientists discover gigantic magma reservoir beneath Yellowstone super-volcano
Sci-News
A team of scientists led by Dr. Hsin-Hua Huang of California Institute of Technology in Pasadena and the University of Utah has discovered a reservoir of partly molten rock 19-45 kilometres beneath the Yellowstone super-volcano. This magma body has a volume of 46,000 cubic kilometres, approximately 4.5 times larger than the previously known upper-crustal magma reservoir.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Ontario government funds graphite research for Zenyatta (Northern Miner)
How your phone could save you from an impending earthquake (National Geographic)
Beyond the lithium ion — a significant step toward a better performing battery (Phys.org)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 



Field Notes

Bernard Kradjian, Communications Coordinator — APGO, 416.203.2746 ext.23   
Send feedback


Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
Download media kit

Katherine Radin, Content Editor, 289.695.5388   
Contribute news


This edition of Field Notes was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!

Recent issues


April 23, 2015
April 16, 2015
April 9, 2015






50 Minthorn Blvd., Suite 800, Thornhill, ON, L3T 7X8