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 Association News

This year's photo competition winner is Amber Blackwell
APGO
Thank you Amber Blackwell for this beautiful photograph. Amber took this picture in British Columbia, west of the ghost towns of Kitsault and Alice Arm. She was recognized at this year's Annual General Meeting and a plaque was sent to her. Thank you to all who participated in the photo contest. There were many outstanding photos but only one had to be chosen by APGO members. We look forward to your participation next year.

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Quebec Mines — Nov. 23-26, 2015
Government of Quebec
Crossroads of Geoscience and Mineral Resources
Quebec City Convention Centre
For more information, please click here.

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Recommendations of the Mining Health and Safety Prevention Review
Laurentian University
The Mining Health Safety and Prevention Review released its final report on April 15, 2015. Over the course of 15 months, the Review studied the state of health and safety in Ontario mines. The result of this work were 18 recommendations designed to get miners home safe. These recommendations were clustered in the six themes of the Review, the capacity of the mining health and safety system to meet the needs of the mining sector, training, emergency plans and mine rescue, the Internal Responsibility System, hazard identification and mitigation, and new technology/management of change processes.
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Disclaimer: The media articles featured in Field Notes do not express or reflect the opinions of the Association of Professional Geoscientists of Ontario, or any employee thereof.


Wynne defends slow progress in Ring of Fire
Brampton Guardian
Kathleen Wynne says there may be no "shovels in the ground" yet in the Ring of Fire, but the Ontario premier is defending the slow progress in developing the chromite-rich region by saying it takes time to get it right. The province has earmarked $1 billion for infrastructure in the northern Ontario mining area that holds one of the world's richest deposits of chromite — used to make stainless steel — as well as nickel, copper and platinum, valued at anywhere from $30 billion to $60 billion.
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Vale's West Mines team wins Ontario title
Canadian Mining Journal
Vale's West Mines team were crowned with the coveted golden hard hats when they won the Ontario provincial mine rescue competition that took place recently at Thunder Bay's Fort William Gardens. The team of dedicated volunteers from Vale's Sudbury Operations took home first overall after two days of intense competition.
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Grand Bend area wastewater treatment facility gets praise
Sarnia Observer
A water treatment plant north of Grand Bend is one of a kind. And recently it was suitably recognized. The Grand Bend Area Wastewater Treatment Facility was formally awarded the Envision Platinum Award from the Institute of Sustainable Infrastructure. As such, the facility has earned the first ISI Envision verification in Canada, and is the only wastewater facility in the world to hold that distinction.
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Red Pine Exploration updates resource at Wawa project
The Northern Miner
Like many other juniors in today's depressed commodities market, Red Pine Exploration seems to have a lot more going for it than its four cent share price would suggest. The junior has an option to own 30 per cent of the 1.1 million-ounce Wawa gold project, two kilometres southeast of the historic mining town of Wawa in northern Ontario. The eight past-producing underground mines on the property, all situated within about five kilometres of each other, produced more than 120,000-ounce gold before most of them shut down in the 1930s.
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50 years later, Sapawe Gold Mine folds
Atikokan Progress
Sapawe Gold Mine — the company at least — is no more. Almost 50 years after giving up its last gold (the mine yielded almost 5,000 ounces between 1963 and 1966), Ontario courts have approved the voluntary dissolution of the company. Cashed out, the company is worth about $188,000, most of which will end up with the Ontario Public Guardian and Trustee.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Researchers discover new fundamental property of rocks (Phys.org)
Covergalls clothing line featured in Women Who Rock fashion show (Toronto Star)
Mining world loses 'great figure' (The Sudbury Star)
Firm gung-ho on Ring of Fire (The Chronicle Journal)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Report: Mines more costly in Far North
Northern Ontario Business
It came as no surprise to the Mining Association of Canada (MAC) that it's more expensive to mine in the Far North than in the south, but thanks to a new report, the association has quantified that difference. "In the case of base metals, or gold mines, the difference is really significant," said Pierre Gratton, MAC president and CEO. In its report, called Levelling the Playing Field, the association found the capital costs for base metal mines are, on average, 2.5 times higher in the Far North.
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What B.C. can learn from Califormia's drought
The Nelson Daily
British Columbia can learn valuable lessons from California's extreme drought and recent groundwater law reforms as it drafts its own groundwater regulations, which will have impact in communities across the province. Released by the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance and Ecojustice, the research report, California's Oranges and B.C.'s Apples? Lessons for B.C. from California Groundwater Reform analyzes California's legislation while taking into account the climatic, social, and legal differences between the state and province.
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U of C researcher studies human-caused earthquakes
Calgary Herald
A University of Calgary professor is working with colleagues across North America to study earthquakes triggered by fracking and other industrial activities. The research, published online recently in the Seismological Research Letters, looked at evidence that earthquakes are caused by injecting fluids from oil and gas operations deep into the earth.
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Brine harvesting of lithium vs. hard rock mining
Mining Feeds
Conventional wisdom suggests that hard rock lithium mining occupies a much larger environmental footprint, takes a longer time from exploration to production and is more expensive than brine harvesting methodologies. This alone makes old fashioned hard rock mining less and less popular around the globe.
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Understanding the softness in Earth's lithosphere
Phys.org
Yale researchers have proposed a new model to explain the drop in elastic stiffness in the middle of the Earth's continental lithosphere. Lithosphere is the stiff layer of rock that lies atop the slow-motion convection of Earth's solid, yet ductile, interior. It is the "plate" of plate tectonics, the system of interlocking fragments that explains earthquakes, volcanoes, and even the long-term variation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
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Field Notes

Bernard Kradjian, Communications Coordinator — APGO, 416.203.2746 ext.23   
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Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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Katherine Radin, Content Editor, 289.695.5388   
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