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Hoover Consulting

Michael F. Hoover provides geologic, hydrologic, soil engineering and expert witness services to a wide range of clients.

 


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 This Week's Showcase

Underground intelligence: the need to map, monitor, and manage Canada's groundwater resources
POWI
The Program on Water Issues at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, recently presented Underground Intelligence: The need to map, monitor, and manage Canada's groundwater resources in an era of drought and climate change. The conference featured a keynote presentation and discussion paper by author Ed Struzik. The four-part webcast is now available online for viewing.
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Geologists find fault system that could be first signs of future supercontinent
Wired
A new active fault system has been discovered off the coast of Portugal, which scientists believe could be the first signs of an eventual convergence of the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. Geologists from Monash University mapped the ocean floor off the coast of the Iberian Peninsula, finding the evidence for has been described as "an embryonic subduction zone."
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With its entrepreneurial spirit, Alberta is no one trick hydrocarbon pony
The Globe and Mail
Alberta will never, ever run out of molecules of oil in the ground. With new technologies that have untapped the oil sands, there are now more potential resources than ever before. There's no way the oil will ever run out. But now even stormier questions bear down on Albertans — what happens if no one wants to buy it at the price required to dig it up? Or worse, what happens if it can't be piped out? These uglier realities are creating some worry lines on the brows of the Armani-suited in downtown Calgary.
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Geologists using drones to hunt for oil
Point of Beginning
Researchers at Centre for Integrated Petroleum Research, a joint venture between the University of Bergen and Uni Research, have found a new method — using drones to map new oil reserves from the air. "In reality, the drones can be viewed as an advanced camera tripod, which helps geologists map inaccessible land in an efficient manner. The use of drones facilitates efforts to define the geology and to find oil," says CIPR researcher Aleksandra Sima about the drone that she and her fellow researchers have just acquired to take aerial shots of rocks.
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Vital Infrastructure

Geophysical surveys are performed to investigate various subsurface conditions for roads, tunnels, pipelines, powerplants, landfills, water supplies, airports, dams, levees and wind turbine projects.
Environmental Site Assessments

With years of experience in subsurface site investigations, Shannon & Wilson is a leader in identifying the nature and extent of environmental impacts to groundwater, surface water, soils, air, and sediment.
Pyramid Geophysical Services

Pyramid Environmental offers a full line of geophysical capabilities. We have experience in a wide variety of geographical areas and projects, including hazardous waste sites, underground storage tanks, landfills, dumpsites, geologic hazards, and groundwater studies.


 In the Media


Disclaimer: The media articles featured in Field Notes do not express or reflect the opinions of the Association of Professional Geoscientists of Ontario, or any employee thereof.



Mining equipment makers rise to efficiency challenge
Reuters
Mining equipment manufacturers are making improvements to machinery that they hope will deliver productivity gains for customers and counter falling orders. Under pressure from investors for higher returns, miners want to get the most out of every shovel, grinder and truck to help maintain margins that are being squeezed by high labour and energy costs, and cooling commodity prices. While much of the equipment used in mines is unlikely to change dramatically, small improvements could make a difference for both the industry and the firms supplying it.
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NDP MP tables bill to protect North Bay's source of drinking water
Baytoday.ca
Despite Conservatives gutting protection to Canada's lakes and rivers, New Democrats are continuing with a campaign to restore environmental protection on bodies of water by tabling a bill to restore protection to Trout Lake, the source of drinking water for North Bay. "The Conservatives have shown us that they just don’t care about protecting Canada’s lakes and rivers, like Trout Lake, so New Democrats are ready to take leadership by protecting this lake for everyone — boaters, campers, anglers, communities and municipalities," said Nickel Belt MP Claude Gravelle.
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  FEATURED COMPANIES
Exponent
Whether you need the scientific explanation for what caused an event or you are charting a course for the future, Exponent can give you the knowledge to make informed, intelligent decisions. MORE
Creek Run L.L.C.
Our mission is to serve our clients in a professional and dedicated manner by helping them to navigate the environmental regulatory process. We will practice strong environmental stewardship in our actions, in our thoughts, and in our hearts. MORE


Potash mine gets a boost
Canadian Mining Journal
A decade ago, managers peering out the office window at Penobsquis mine in Sussex, NB would have been pleased by all the activity outside. For years, a world-wide glut of potash had driven potash prices into the basement of the commodities market; now those prices were staging a comeback, so much so that PotashCorp Saskatchewan purchased the Penobsquis mine, mill, and port facility as part of a larger $112 million transaction from Rio Algom. The future looked promising. That future looked even brighter, says Stewart Brown, because of what lay about a kilometre beyond the Penobsquis mine.
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Tough market forcing mining companies to think outside the box
Resource Investing News
Two recent reports from Ernst & Young show the difficulties currently being faced by mining and exploration companies, but also some ways that the industry is adapting to confront the challenges. The first report discusses how to attract alternative methods of financing and optimize capital, and identifies the quarter's winners and losers. The second report focuses on the business risks that mining companies are facing this year and into 2014, noting that capital allocation and access to capital has "rocketed to the top of the business risk list for mining and metals companies globally."
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'Huge opportunities' for Canadian mining industry to work in developing countries
The Globe and Mail
Canada's international co-operation minister says there are "huge opportunities" for the country's mining industry to work with the Canadian government in developing countries. Speaking at the annual board of directors' meeting for the Mining Association of Canada, Julian Fantino said the extractive industry can play an important role in Canada's international development efforts.
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Greenpeace: Don't limit offshore liability
CBC News
Greenpeace Canada says a new federal legislation announced will not ensure oil companies will pay all cleanup costs related to offshore drilling. The federal government announced it will require oil companies to pay up to $1 billion for a spill, whether or not they're at fault. That's up from $40 million for spills offshore in the Arctic. The federal government plans to introduce the new legislation this fall.
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