This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.



Text Version   RSS   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit September 23, 2015

Home   Publications   Meetings   Programs   Membership   Advocacy   Careers   Contact    




Opportunities with Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Promoting academic cooperation between scientists & scholars with opportunities to further your academic & professional career.





 



A material that is both transparent and reflective
PhysicsWorld
A material with exotic optical properties that make it both transparent and reflective to light has been created by physicists in the U.S. and Singapore. The material, which resembles a thin piece of glass with tiny holes drilled in it, could be used to boost the output of some lasers and detect extremely small quantities of biological and chemical materials.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Skintight invisibility cloak radiates deception
ScienceNOW
In J. K. Rowling's blockbuster novel Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, the young wizard Harry receives an invisibility cloak: a silky garment that makes him disappear. Now, researchers in the budding field of invisibility cloaking have made an ultrathin cloak of their own.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The surprising physics of pulling a bike with a rubber band
Wired
Do you need some practice with force diagrams for your introductory (or advanced) physics course? Here are three questions (and the last one is awesome) about the motion of a bike as it is pulled.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


How that ice ball in your cocktail inspired a cool physics experiment
Gizmodo
Any decent bartender knows that ice can dilute your drink as it melts. That’s why they use as much ice as possible: it keeps the drink colder, longer. An even better way to achieve the same effect is to use giant ice balls. Now this snazzy bartender’s trick has led to a discovery in physics. Read the associated APS Physics Focus article.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Missed an issue of the APS Weekly NewsBrief? Click here to visit the APS Weekly NewsBrief archive.


How earthquakes can trigger copycat quakes 1000 kilometers away
NewScientist
Seismic waves unleashed during the recent magnitude 8.3 earthquake in Chile could have triggered aftershocks as far as 1000 kilometres away. That's because they can shake up grains of rock wedged inside distant faults. According to computer models, even weak waves at the right frequency could be enough to start a new quake by vibrating that grist into a more slippery, liquid-like layer. Read the associated APS Physics Synopsis.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Cryogenic Control Systems, Inc.

We manufacture precision electronic instrumentation for both laboratory and industrial process control applications, and offer a full line of cryogenic temperature controllers, monitors, cryogenic accessories and temperature sensors. Instruments feature a wide temperature range (operation from 20mK to over 1500K), network connectivity and supports a wider variety of temperature sensors than any other manufacturer. MORE
Industrial Indexing Systems, Inc.

Industrial Indexing Systems provides high performance motion control products for a wide range of machinery automation and a supplier of turnkey automation systems specializing in mechatronic type systems.

Click here for more information!
Phantom Digital High-Speed Cameras


When it's too fast to see, and too important not to

• Proprietary CMOS sensor designs
• High-throughput camera architecture
• Embedded technology for image acquisition, analysis, storage and transport

Visit our website for more information.


Researchers develop simple way to ward off Trojan attacks on quantum cryptographic systems
PhysOrg
A team of researchers working for Toshiba in Japan and the U.K. has found a way to prevent Trojan horse attacks on quantum key distribution (QKD) systems. They describe their ideas in a paper they have had published in Physical Review X. Read the associated APS Physics Synopsis.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Are Faraday cages less effective than previously thought?
PhysicsWorld
A Faraday cage is a box made of metal mesh that allows no electromagnetic radiation in or out and is often used to shield delicate instruments from interference. A new study by applied mathematicians at the University of Oxford suggests that the cages may not be as good at shielding electromagnetic radiation as previously thought.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
I.C.E. - Independence Cryogenic Engineering

• Parts and Service Available for Varian and Bruker Closed Cycle Coolers • Cryogenic Refrigeration Parts • MRI Magnet Service • Field Service and Depot Repairs • 4 Kelvin Cold Heads and Compressors

Contact us to learn more about our products.
DEARBORN RESOURCES:

has published a new book with a fresh look at four-dimensional space.

What Einstein Did Not See: Redefining Time to Understand Space (watch video)


Football physics: Nobody catches the ball at its highest point
Forbes
Chad Orzel writes, "Listening to the Giants-Falcons football game in the car this afternoon, I heard the call of a touchdown pass from Matt Ryan to Leonard Hankerson. This was annoying to me, as I'm a Giants fan, but adding insult to injury, Giants play-by-play guy Bob Papa deployed one of my least favorite commentary cliches ever, saying that Hankerson 'caught the ball at its highest point.' This is just infuriating to a physicist, and let me try to explain why."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Quantum 'weeping angel' effect freezes atoms in place
Gizmodo
The paradox of Schroedinger’s Cat famously demonstrates that a quantum cat sealed in a box is both alive and dead at the same time until we look inside, at which point it becomes one or the other. Such is the weirdness of quantum mechanics. But if a mere act of observation determines the outcome of an experiment, what happens if we never look away? According to a new analysis, time effectively stands still.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


APS PHYSICS JOB CENTER

Job Title Company Location
Signal Processing Analyst Biodesix Steamboat Springs, CO
Wilson Fellowship in Experimental Physics Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, IL
Physics Senior Scientist Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM
Condensed Matter Theory Support Scientist National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Florida
Optical Scientist Micro Encoder Inc. Kirkland, WA

For a complete list of job postings, click here.

Have a job to post? Click here.
 
APS Weekly NewsBrief
Subscribe to the APS Weekly Newsbrief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Julie Bernhard, Executive Editor, 469.420.2647   
Contribute news



To provide feedback to APS, please contact Trish Lettieri, APS Director of Membership 301.209.3272

This edition of the APS Weekly NewsBrief was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.
Recent issues
Sept. 16, 2015
Sept. 9, 2015
Sept. 2, 2015
Aug. 26, 2015



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063