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Team shows why wound healing is impaired in diabetics
University of Pennsylvania via Medical Xpress
One of the most troubling complications of diabetes is its effect on wound healing. Roughly 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from a nonhealing wound in their lifetime. In some cases, these open ulcers on the skin lead to amputations. Now, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine have identified a critical molecule that helps explain why diabetics suffer from this problem and pinpoints a target for therapies that could help boost healing.
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 APWCA Highlights


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Join us for the 14th Annual APWCA National Clinical Conference
March 25-29
Loews Philadelphia Hotel

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 Industry News


Rice researchers develop new version of hydrogel to promote wound healing
Rice University via News-Medical.Net
Rice University scientists have found the balance necessary to aid healing with high-tech hydrogel. Rice chemist Jeffrey Hartgerink, lead author Vivek Kumar and their colleagues have created a new version of the hydrogel that can be injected into an internal wound and help it heal while slowly degrading as it is replaced by natural tissue.
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Clean hands save lives: A vigilance that must never falter
By Christina Thielst
Hand washing in healthcare has long been associated with preventing the spread of disease, but frequent hand washing has its challenges. In the early 2000s, the recipe for alcohol-based hand rubs was perfected — offering a more efficient, portable and worker-friendly alternative. Since then, these hand sanitizing gels have been promoted for controlling the spread of nosocomial influenza and infections around the world. However, the behavior of healthcare workers — or the sociology of cleaning hands to save lives — is also an important consideration.
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University of Miami study explores how stem cells can help burn victims
Miami Herald
In a Miami hospital room and a research lab a few buildings away, doctors conducting stem cell clinical trials are trying to change the way burn victims are treated — including military personnel injured in the line of duty. A pair of University of Miami doctors are conducting the research, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, to develop new therapies using donor stem cells to restore tissue and reduce long-term scarring from burns. The treatment, if successful, could revolutionize burn care by decreasing the need for reconstructive skin graft surgery.
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Smart bandage could revolutionize wound care
KDKA-TV
We have phones, watches, even cars that are "smart." Now, a group of researchers has come up with a "smart bandage"that could turn wound care on its head. The Smart Bandage is a simple design that could revolutionize how wounds are managed, especially burns and diabetic ulcers, which can be a challenge because it's hard to tell if they're healing properly.
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Antibiotic-resistant infections on the rise
KABB-TV
Antibiotic-resistant infections are on the rise, and the consequences can be life limiting or life ending. Duane Guiler is lucky to have his left leg after a diabetic foot wound proved resistant to initial antibiotics. "The foot progressed," explained Dr. Frederick Veser. "Became extremely infected, what we call blew up." Examining the foot after several surgeries, hyperbaric treatments and specialized antibiotics revealed improvement. "We went from a devastated foot and leg to one that is very nearly healed at this point," said Veser.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    A minimally invasive procedure can save your limbs by restoring blood flow (Cleveland Clinic)
Clean gloves no worse than sterile for wound infections (Medical News Today)
With age comes a growing risk of malnutrition (The Wall Street Journal (tiered subscription model))
Venous leg ulcers (Delaware County News Network)
Brain plasticity: Fact or fiction? (By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



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