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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit February 18, 2015


 

Study reveals mechanical forces that drive epithelial wound healing
National University of Singapore via News-Medical.Net
A cellular tug-of-war mechanically drives gap closure. A collaborative study led by scientists from the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore has revealed the mechanical forces that drive epithelial wound healing in the absence of cell supporting environment. This research was published in Nature Communications in January 2015.
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 APWCA Highlights


Save the date: March 25-29, 2015
APWCA
Join us for the 14th Annual APWCA National Clinical Conference
March 25-29
Loews Philadelphia Hotel

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 Industry News


Polish scientists develop hydrogel to treat diabetic wounds
Xinhuanet
Polish scientists from the Lodz University of Technology have developed an innovative hydrogel dressing to treat diabetic wounds, polish media reported recently. The dressing delivers tetrapeptides to the wound, causing the restoration and creation of new blood vessels within it and therefore reducing the number of amputations, according to the Polish Press Agency.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Enluxtra makes wound healing simple

Numerous reports of faster healing in chronic wounds prove the effectiveness of Enluxtra "smart" dressing. Over 100,000 patients received this easy, affordable, and painless treatment, with impressive results. Enluxtra's "no-guesswork" feedback-driven material changes its function from absorption to hydration as needed, which makes it a perfect dressing for any wound.
 


Protein in fish skin may help wounds heal safely
Medical News Today
Applying collagen to wounds can help skin heal faster, but when the collagen comes from animals, such as cows and pigs, it brings with it a small risk of disease. Now, a new study suggests collagen from tilapia fish — an increasingly popular seafood in the U.S. — may offer a safer alternative.
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Electrical stimulation therapy for pressure ulcers: Does it work?
GeriPal
Electrical stimulation therapy is the application of a current across a wound. The theoretical mechanism of this therapy is to replicate the "current of injury" that occurs normally when there is a break in the skin. This current of injury has been shown in various models to promote angiogenesis, fibroblast migration promoting granulation and keratinocyte migration promoting epithelialization. The results of a study in PubMed showed that patients who received electrical stimulation to their pressure ulcers had a mean percent wound healing of 13.5 more than the controls, which translates to 144 percent increase in wound healing.
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CMS plans to shorten meaningful use Stage 2 to 90 days
By Scott Rupp
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services buckled, or so it seems. After much conjecture, gesturing and soapbox shouting from healthcare leaders, it looks like the reporting period for sending data collected in the electronic health record as part of meaningful use Stage 2 will be shortened from 365 days to 90. According to SearchHealthIT, "The time and money required to attest for a 365-day reporting period gave heartburn to many hospitals and physicians."
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Personalized medicine is promising but needs smarter regulation
Forbes
In a high-profile White House event attended by medical researchers, patients' advocates and drug and biotechnology company executives on Jan. 30, President Barack Obama plugged medicine's new mantra, "the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time." It reflects that medical treatments are gradually shifting from a relatively imprecise "one size fits all" approach to a more personalized one, so that patients can be matched to the best therapy based on their genetic makeup and other predictive factors.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Forcing wounds to close (National University of Singapore via Medical Xpress)
How long should the antibiotic therapy for nonsurgically treated diabetic foot osteomyelitis be? (Diabetes in Control)
Precision medicine research is a misplaced national priority (The Hill)
Human cadavers provide new skin for chronic wounds (LiveScience via FOX News)
How long should the antibiotic therapy for nonsurgically treated diabetic foot osteomyelitis be? (Diabetes in Control)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



Wound Care Report
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Rebecca Eberhardt, Content Editor, 469.420.2608  
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