This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit February 25, 2015


 

Mechanism identified behind impaired wound healing in diabetics
Medical News Today
A molecule has been identified by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine that may explain why wound healing is impaired in people with diabetes. The scientists behind the discovery believe the molecule may also offer a new target for therapies that could improve healing.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


 APWCA Highlights


Save the date: March 25-29, 2015
APWCA
Join us for the 14th Annual APWCA National Clinical Conference
March 25-29
Loews Philadelphia Hotel

Register online now and save.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 Industry News


Case study demonstrating methods of debridement
Nursing in Practice
Debridement is the process of removing necrosis or foreign material from a wound in order to aid healing. There are many different debridement techniques and the evidence supporting one over the other is not conclusive. The aim of this article is to demonstrate different debridement methods and the challenges faced when treating patients in a community setting.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Enluxtra makes wound healing simple

Numerous reports of faster healing in chronic wounds prove the effectiveness of Enluxtra "smart" dressing. Over 100,000 patients received this easy, affordable, and painless treatment, with impressive results. Enluxtra's "no-guesswork" feedback-driven material changes its function from absorption to hydration as needed, which makes it a perfect dressing for any wound.
 


The smart bandage treating wounds
BBC
Researchers are looking into new ways to deliver medical treatment that could be cheaper and more effective than today. Projects include smart bandages that can detect how well a wound is healing, a machine that prints human tissue and a gene radar that can quickly diagnose your illness.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Wound healing: Better understanding of how skin cells close gaps
MedicalResearch.com
Epithelial cells have a natural tendency to close gaps and this feature plays a crucial role in many biological processes, such as embryological development and wound healing. It is generally accepted that two major mechanisms exist that underlie, such a closure.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Miss an issue of Wound Care Report? Click here to visit Wound Care Report archive page.


No crosswalk from ICD-9, but ICD-10 is on track for October
by Scott E. Rupp
The "delay ICD-10" proponents have found themselves another piece of ammunition to use in their war against transitioning from the current ICD-9 coding system. The latest development in the never-ending fight against replacing the decades-old version is a new study from Vanderbilt University that suggests that mapping codes between ICD-9 and ICD-10 could be a problem.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Fish skin bandages helps heal wounds
ChemistryWorld via Scientific American
It might not sound terribly appealing, but the best way to heal skin wounds could be to apply some fish skin protein. That, at least, is the claim of a group of researchers in China who were able to speed up skin wound healing on mice using collagen obtained from the skin of tilapia fish.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Forcing wounds to close (National University of Singapore via Medical Xpress)
How long should the antibiotic therapy for nonsurgically treated diabetic foot osteomyelitis be? (Diabetes in Control)
Precision medicine research is a misplaced national priority (The Hill)
Human cadavers provide new skin for chronic wounds (LiveScience via FOX News)
How long should the antibiotic therapy for nonsurgically treated diabetic foot osteomyelitis be? (Diabetes in Control)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



Wound Care Report
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Rebecca Eberhardt, Content Editor, 469.420.2608  
Contribute news

Learn how to add us to your safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox.

This edition of the Wound Care Report was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!

Recent issue

Feb. 18, 2015
Feb. 11, 2015
Feb. 4, 2015
Jan. 28, 2015






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063