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Hyperbaric oxygen therapy saving life, limb for diabetics
Bahama Islands Info
A few years after being diagnosed with diabetes, Dilith Nairn stepped on a tack and as often happens to diabetics, developed a wound that eventually became infected. When a team of physicians and wound care specialists at Doctors Hospital in Nassau, Bahamas, told him that his foot simply wasn't healing as they'd hoped, he knew all too well what his future could hold.
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Easy-to-use IV antibiotics could help treat serious skin infections
HealthDay News via Doctors Lounge
Severe skin infections are often treated with IV antibiotics for days. But two new drugs — given once a week or just once — could offer an alternative, researchers report. The findings come from two independent studies published June 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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Foot pad could help diabetics
IOL
Diabetes patients could soon be able to check for nerve damage using a home device, which works by detecting sweat. The new stick-on pad changes color from blue to pink when all is well, but does not change if there are problems with the nerves. Diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage, is a common complication of uncontrolled diabetes.
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Obese Caucasian women over 50 with kidney failure most likely to develop calciphylaxis
dailyRX News
Scientists don't fully understand calciphylaxis, a rare and potentially deadly blood vessel condition. Calciphylaxis creates what researchers have described as a "biological cement" that inflames blood vessels, increasing risk of infection and skin ulcers.
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6 alternatives to antibiotics
The Epoch Times
Alexander Fleming discovered the first antibiotic, penicillin, in 1927. Since then, antibiotics have saved millions of lives worldwide. Although antibiotics have many beneficial effects, over-use of these medicines has created the new problem of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance is one of the world's most critical public health concerns.
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South Carolina wound healing center receives award
WMBF-TV
Conway Medical Center's Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine in South Carolina was awarded Center of Distinction Award for achieved patient satisfaction of over 92 percent and a minimum 91 percent wound healing rate within 30 median days to heal.

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Researchers ID protein involved in wound healing, tumor growth
Dermatology Times
A protein that plays a role in healing wounds and in tumor growth could be a future therapeutic target, recent research suggests.

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Findings have important implications for improving war wound healing
American Society for Microbiology via News-Medical.Net
War wounds that heal successfully frequently contain different microbial species from those that heal poorly, according to a paper published ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

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Wound Care Report
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Rebecca Eberhardt, Content Editor, 469.420.2608  
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