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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit June 17, 2014


 

Microbes of the skin
The Scientist
The microbial communities that inhabit the skin, perhaps the most diverse of the human body, are suspected to be key players in host defense. New evidence suggests that commensal skin bacteria both directly protect humans from pathogenic invaders and help the immune system maintain that delicate balance between effective protection and damaging inflammation. While causal links between the skin's commensal microbes and health or disease remain to be demonstrated, the clues that have accumulated in the last few years paint a suggestive picture.
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Burst of mutations during initial infection allows bacteria to evade human immune response
Infection Control Today
Bacteria that cause ulcers in humans undergo accelerated evolution during the initial stages of infection, allowing them to evade the immune system, according to new research by an international team of researchers, including Penn State scientists. The study shows, for the first time and in real-time, the interplay between the human immune system and invading bacteria that allows the bacteria to counter the immune response by quickly evolving.
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Outpatient diabetes care quality matters after limb revascularization
medwireNews
High-quality outpatient diabetes care improves diabetic patients' chances of avoiding major ischaemic events and amputation after undergoing limb revascularisation, a study shows. "While the effect size is modest, our data suggests that improving outpatient diabetic care may help impact limb salvage outcomes in high-risk patients that traditionally have been hard to improve," say the researchers, led by Benjamin Brooke at the University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.
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Nursing homes achieved 40 percent pressure ulcer reduction working with Medicare QIOs
McKnight's Long-Term Care News
Nursing homes dramatically reduced pressure ulcer rates and restraint use in the last three years by participating in Medicare Quality Improvement Organization initiatives, according to new government data.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy saving life, limb for diabetics (Bahama Islands Info)
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Once-daily tedizolid effective for acute skin infections
Medscape (subscriber article)
Once-daily tedizolid is noninferior and has a similar adverse effect profile to twice-daily linezolid in the treatment of acute bacterial skin infections and skin-structure infections, according to results from a phase-three study called the TR-701 FA vs. Linezolid for the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections trial, published online June 6 in Lancet Infectious Disease.
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Sepsis may reactivate dormant viruses, causing secondary infections
Medical Daily
Sepsis potentially is a life-threatening complication resulting from infection, anything from a simple scratch on the knee to some contamination acquired while in the hospital. Anyone can develop sepsis, a leading cause of death among hospital patients. Now, researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine have found a link between late-stage sepsis and reactivation of otherwise-dormant viruses in the body.
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Risk for fracture, post-fracture complications higher in diabetes
Healio
Patients with diabetes are at an increased long-term risk for fracture and more prone to adverse events and death after a fracture, according to recent findings. In two nationwide, retrospective cohort studies, researchers explored the relationships between fracture risk and post-fracture events in patients with diabetes.
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Tissue Regenix lauches DermaCare in US
ShareCast
Tissue Regenix surged after the launch of its skin care device DermaPure in the U.S. following the signing of an exclusive government supplier partnership with TASSMA for the distribution of the treatment. The agreement will allow the firm to target the Department of Veteran's Affairs Healthcare System and the numerous branches of the U.S. military, a market that is worth $1.4 million a year, it said. DermaPure works by removing the DNA and cells from donated skin to leave "a natural biological scaffold" that can be placed in the wound to aid natural healing by attracting the patient's own cells to the wound area.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
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TRENDING ARTICLE
Bariatric surgery pays off long term in diabetes
MedPage Today
Gastric bypass beat diet and lifestyle for helping obese patients with Type 2 diabetes shed both their disease and its long-term consequences, studies showed.

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Hyperbaric oxygen therapy saving life, limb for diabetics
Bahama Islands Info
A few years after being diagnosed with diabetes, Dilith Nairn stepped on a tack and as often happens to diabetics, developed a wound that eventually became infected.

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Researchers ID protein involved in wound healing, tumor growth
Dermatology Times
A protein that plays a role in healing wounds and in tumor growth could be a future therapeutic target, recent research suggests.

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Wound Care Report
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Rebecca Eberhardt, Content Editor, 469.420.2608  
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