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Mutations during initial infection allows bacteria to evade immune response
Pennsylvania State University via Medical Xpress
Bacteria that cause ulcers in humans undergo accelerated evolution during the initial stages of infection, allowing them to evade the immune system, according to new research by an international team of researchers, including Penn State scientists. For the first time, and in real-time, the study shows the interplay between the human immune system and invading bacteria that allows the bacteria to counter the immune response by quickly evolving.
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New technology detects pathogens in soldiers' wounds
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory via Medical Xpress
A biological detection technology developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists can detect bacterial pathogens in the wounds of U.S. soldiers that previously have been missed by other technologies. This advance may, in time, allow an improvement in how soldiers' wounds are treated.
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Skin infections: Practical guide for clinicians
Clinical Infectious Diseases via MedPage Today
Accurate diagnosis is the key to treating skin and soft tissue infections, according to new practice guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America. While antibiotic treatment is life-saving in some cases, the guidelines stress that most skin and soft tissue infections are mild and will heal on their own.
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Common genetic link discovered in fatal autoimmune skin disease
Medical News Today
Autoimmune disease occurs when the body's own natural defense system rebels against itself. One example is pemphigus vulgaris, a blistering skin disease in which autoantibodies attack desmoglein 3, the protein that binds together skin cells. Left untreated, PV can be fatal. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania recently found a shared genetic link in the autoimmune response among PV patients that provides important new clues about how autoantibodies in PV originate. Full results of the new study are available in Nature Communications.
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ICD-10: Everything you need to know
By Maria Frisch
The compliance deadline for ICD-10 is Oct. 1, 2015 — a change expected to impact all HIPAA-covered entities. While this rollout will entail both time and cost burdens throughout healthcare, the move from ICD-9 to ICD-10 reflects significant advances in medicine that have occurred during the last three decades. Implementation of ICD-10 is not optional, and rollouts will be complex. This article highlights some important facts and resources regarding the transition to ICD-10.
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Study: Common genetic link in fatal autoimmune skin disease
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine via Medical Xxpress
Autoimmune disease occurs when the body's own natural defense system rebels against itself. One example is pemphigus vulgaris, a blistering skin disease in which autoantibodies attack desmoglein 3, the protein that binds together skin cells.

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Bariatric surgery pays off long term in diabetes
MedPage Today
Gastric bypass beat diet and lifestyle for helping obese patients with Type 2 diabetes shed both their disease and its long-term consequences, studies showed.

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Researchers ID protein involved in wound healing, tumor growth
Dermatology Times
A protein that plays a role in healing wounds and in tumor growth could be a future therapeutic target, recent research suggests.

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Researchers discover analgesic mechanism that prevents pain in Buruli ulcer patients
Inserm via News-Medical.Net
When the body receives an injury to the skin, a signal is sent to the brain, which generates a sensation of pain. Team researchers in France have studied lesions in patients with Buruli ulcer, a tropical disease. In an article published in the journal Cell, they show that, despite the extent and severity of these wounds, they are less painful than others that seem relatively minor. They discovered an analgesic mechanism that limits the transmission of pain signals to the brain. An understanding of this mechanism may be useful in developing new drugs for pain relief.
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New invention provides simple, highly effective way for patients to self-treat keloid scars
World Scientific via News-Medical.Net
Scars — in particular keloid scars that result from overgrowth of skin tissue after injuries or surgeries — are unsightly and can even lead to disfigurement and psychological problems of affected patients. Individuals with darker pigmentation are more likely to develop this skin tissue disorder. Current therapy options, including surgery and injections of corticosteroids into scar tissues, are often ineffective, require clinical supervision and can be costly. The team of scientists and engineers from Nanyang Technological University's School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering in Singapore, in collaboration with clinicians from Singapore's National Skin Centre, have developed a special patch made from polymers fabricated into microneedles.
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