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Breakthrough in fighting infections
Medical News Today
Scientists at the University of Brighton have found a potential new weapon in the war on infections by identifying the bacterial genes involved. This new insight could lead to new methods of preventing infections and contribute to overcoming problems with antibiotic resistance. The university scientists are examining the development of common infections that affect many hospital and nursing home patients.
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New injectable foam to treat battlefield wounds
Business Standard
An injectable foam system has been developed to stop profuse bleeding in wounded soldiers to boost their odds of survival in the battlefield. To give these soldiers a fighting chance at survival, Johns Hopkins University undergraduates have invented an injectable foam system designed to stop profuse bleeding from a wound where a limb or the head is connected to the torso.
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Drug used to prevent clots lowers risk of hospitalization for catheter-related bacterial infections
Medical News Today
Using an expensive agent to prevent blood clots in kidney failure patients' dialysis catheters may turn out to be less costly overall due to its ability to reduce medical complications, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is a medication used to break up blood clots that occur in the vessels of patients having a heart attack. A recent clinical trial revealed that using rt-PA once per week plus the anticlotting agent heparin twice per week was better than using heparin alone three times per week for preventing blood clots and infections in dialysis catheters.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Your skin can 'sniff' certain aromas that help it heal faster (The Conversation)
1 possible answer to healing chronic diabetic foot ulcers (Diabetes In Control)
Hyperspectral imaging: Noninvasive, painless way to determine how well damaged tissue is healing over a wide area (Medical News Today)
How to do it: Diabetic wound management (McKnight's)

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6 ways to take advantage of the delay in ICD-10 compliance
HIT Consultant
Those who invested early on in ICD-10 implementation may feel a level of frustration with recently signed legislation delaying ICD-10 compliance to Oct. 1, 2015, but it may be a blessing in disguise. All organizations required to implement ICD-10 can take advantage of the delay, viewing it as an opportunity to re-assess their organization's implementation progress and readiness. With the delay affirmed, now is the time to step back, relax some of your implementation activities and leverage the extra time you're afforded to ensure success in your organization's cutover to ICD-10.
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Pressure ulcers: Tips for treatment, prevention
Infection Control Today
Stage III and IV pressure ulcers, which cause significant patient morbidity and generate substantial treatment costs, are among the hospital-acquired conditions considered to be preventable by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These so-called "never" events are among the preventable adverse events being addressed by CMS as part of the pay-for-performance mandate in an effort to improve patient safety, reduce medical errors and meet regulatory requirements. CMS provides specific regulatory guidance and oversight on the prevention of pressure ulcers in long-term care residents. To review, section 5001(c) of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 requires identification of conditions that are high-cost, high-volume or both, result in the assignment of a case to a DRG that has a higher payment when present as a secondary diagnosis and could reasonably have been prevented through the application of evidence-based guidelines.
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Surviving flesh-killing necrotizing fasciitis
Hanford Sentinel
The bacteria that can cause the necrotizing fasciitis are around us all the time, living on our skin and in the soil, explained Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease specialist at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The most common are group A Streptococcus, which also cause strep throat. Why these species turn into a deadly illness for some and not for others remains a mystery.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
Your skin can heal by 'sniffing' aromas
The Conversation via LiveScience
The nose is not the only place where olfactory receptors are found. Cells of other tissues of the body use these receptors to react to chemical "odor" compounds. And we've discovered that their presence in skin cells can accelerate wound healing.

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1 possible answer to healing chronic diabetic foot ulcers
Diabetes In Control
The exact mechanism by which diabetes impairs wound healing is not fully understood, but may include abnormal inflammatory cell response, impaired neovascularization, decreased synthesis of collagen and increased levels of proteinases.

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Scientists take next step in skin wound treatment
American Chemical Society via ScienceDaily
Scientists are reporting the next step in the evolution of wound treatment with a material that leads to faster healing than existing commercial dressings and prevents potentially harmful bacteria from sticking.

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