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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit July 22, 2014


 

SCAI publishes expert consensus recommendations for treating below-the-knee PAD
HealthCanal.com
The incidence of obesity and diabetes is increasing, and with them, the number of patients with peripheral artery disease or blockages in the arteries of the limbs also is increasing. A new series of expert consensus recommendations developed by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions will help physicians determine the best course of action for patients whose blockages reduce blood flow to their limbs, putting them at risk for gangrene and amputation.
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Researchers show the danger of dormant viruses in the body
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Sepsis is caused by many different types of microbes, including bacteria, fungi and viruses. This is a major challenge in the intensive care unit of hospitals, where it is one of the leading causes of death. Every year, severe sepsis strikes about 750,000 Americans. It's been estimated that between 28 and 50 percent of these people die — far more than the number of deaths in the United States from prostate cancer, breast cancer and AIDS combined. Now, a provocative new study links prolonged episodes of sepsis to the reactivation of otherwise dormant viruses in the body.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Hyperspectral imaging: Noninvasive, painless way to determine how well damaged tissue is healing over a wide area (Medical News Today)
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1 possible answer to healing chronic diabetic foot ulcers (Diabetes In Control)
Keep your feet covered and safe this summer (Delco News Network)

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Hyperbaric oxygen offered to returning veterans with traumatic injuries
Mohave Valley Daily News
There is a movement underway to treat returning military veterans with traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress injury with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy instead of drugs.
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Could antibacterial clay fight superbugs?
Mumbai Mirror |
Researchers have discovered natural clay deposits with antibacterial properties and they could take on drug-resistant bacteria responsible for difficult-to-treat infections in humans.
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Understanding how wounds heal: Helping those with chronic wounds heal faster
University of Toronto via Medical Xpress
You fall and scrape your knee. After cleaning the wound, you plaster a bandage over it and presto, in two to three days, your injury is nothing but a memory. But what really just happened — how did your wound actually heal? Using a student-designed software program called MEDUSA, a special type of microscope and a tool called fluorescent tagging, a group of researchers from the University of Toronto's Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering has been studying just that. And they think they've uncovered how some of the fastest wound healers around.
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Is there a place for Google Glass in hospitals?
The Atlantic
Medical professionals say the device could be helpful, but patient privacy is still a concern.

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1 possible answer to healing chronic diabetic foot ulcers
Diabetes In Control
The exact mechanism by which diabetes impairs wound healing is not fully understood, but may include abnormal inflammatory cell response, impaired neovascularization, decreased synthesis of collagen and increased levels of proteinases.

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Scientists take next step in skin wound treatment
American Chemical Society via ScienceDaily
Scientists are reporting the next step in the evolution of wound treatment with a material that leads to faster healing than existing commercial dressings and prevents potentially harmful bacteria from sticking.

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Wound Care Report
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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