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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit July 29, 2014


 

Laser technology, RF ablation can effectively treat varicose ulcers
Pharmbiz.com
Varicose ulcer, which was impossible to treat surgically, can now be treated with advanced medical technology within an hour's time. It occurs when valves in the veins start leaking into the skin, resulting in severe pain and immobility. Laser technology and radio frequency ablation are the latest two treatments available today.
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 APWCA Highlights


Business course, Sept. 13-14
APWCA
This half-day course will address the issues associated with opening a new wound care and hyperbaric center. In addition, the program introduces techniques to increase the efficiency and profitability of established centers.

Join us Sept. 13-14 at the Hilton Philadelphia Airport.

Click "Read More" for further information, cost and registration.

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 Industry News


Device-related pressure ulcers: Avoidable or not?
Wound Care Advisor
A medical device–related pressure ulcer is defined as a localized injury to the skin or underlying tissue resulting from sustained pressure caused by a medical device. The golden rule of pressure ulcer treatment is to identify the cause of pressure and remove it. Unfortunately, many of the medical devices are needed to sustain the patient's life, so they can't be removed. But does that mean MDRPUs aren't avoidable? Yes and no.
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Hyperbaric oxygen chambers gain use at hospitals
The Telegraph
Gregory Clark, who has diabetes, was prescribed hyperbaric treatments to help heal a stubborn scar after surgery to alleviate foot ulcers, a common complication of his condition. And wound healing is just one of a growing list of uses that are now making hyperbaric chambers proliferate at hospitals around the nation.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Researchers show the danger of dormant viruses in the body (By Dorothy L. Tengler)
SCAI publishes expert consensus recommendations for treating below-the-knee PAD (HealthCanal.com)
Understanding how wounds heal: Helping those with chronic wounds heal faster (University of Toronto via Medical Xpress)
Hyperbaric oxygen offered to returning veterans with traumatic injuries (Mohave Valley Daily News)
Could antibacterial clay fight superbugs? (Mumbai Mirror |)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Pathogen behavior influenced by communication between nostril/skin microbiome bacteria
Medical News Today
A team of scientists has made an important discovery about the molecular interactions that occur between generally benign species of Propionibacterium bacteria and the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, the cause of most "staph" infections. These bacterial species are commonly found in the human nostrils and, also, on human skin. S. aureus is a potential pathogen that inhibits the nostrils of about a quarter of all adults. It is also a common cause of skin and more invasive infections.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword BACTERIA.


When will we take medicinal honey seriously?
BBC
The antibacterial properties of honey have long been known, both ancient Greek and Egyptian physicians are said to have valued it and it was used in the treatment of wounds right up to World War II. Honey's reputation was relegated to that of an old wives' tale in the 20th century after the discovery of penicillin heralded the widespread use of antibiotic drugs to combat infections. But with antibiotic resistance now high on the global agenda, scientists and doctors are working together to once more prove honey's effectiveness in battling life-threatening bacteria.
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Wound assessment: Gathering a history
Wound Educators
Wounds are more than the sum of their parts — they are caused by a myriad of factors that come together to create the setting in which a wound is permitted to form and heal. As such, clinicians must consider both internal and external factors that influence wound formation and wound healing.
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Wound Care Report
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Rebecca Eberhardt, Content Editor, 469.420.2608  
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