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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit September 24, 2014


 

What is the future of limb transplant surgery?
By Alan Kelsky
The ethics of transplanting life-saving organs, such as the heart, lungs and liver, from people who died in a trauma accident is well established. So are the life-saving gifts of a kidney or part of a liver from live donors. Without these extraordinary medical advances people die. But how do you feel about the harvesting of limbs, hands and feet for those who lost theirs in war, from accidents or illness? Is there a controversy about limb transplantation?
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 Industry News


Effects of a pulsatile electrostatic field on ischemic injury to the diabetic foot: Evaluation of refractory ulcers
MDLinx
The macro and microcirculation disease in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus induces ischemic wounds of the lower limbs. The authors have tried to reduce the aggregation of red blood cells and to improve the O2 supply to the tissues and speed the healing of ulcers in T2DM patients. The technique PESF has affected the metabolic processes and the speed of wound healing ulcer in patients with T2DM.
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Patient perception of wound photography
Wound Care Centre at Women's College Hospital and the University of Toronto via Wiley
Having patients view photographs of their wounds can motivate them to become more involved in managing those wounds, according to a study in International Wound Journal, particularly when wounds are in difficult-to-see locations. In the wound care clinic, where the study took place, 86 percent of patients had difficult-to-see wounds and only 20 percent monitored their wounds for healing progress, relying instead on clinicians.
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Study: Sagittal plane deformity may be linked to foot ulceration in Charcot patients
Healio
Deformities of the sagittal plane of the foot are more likely to be associated with foot ulceration in patients with diabetes who have Charcot neuropathy, according to data presented at the recent International Federation of Foot & Ankle Societies Triennial Meeting. "I think the key thing is you have to have heightened awareness if you are treating Charcot patients when you see these patients developing progressive deformity in the sagittal plane," said Dr. Dane K. Wukich.
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Novel device inspired by spleen quickly filters bacteria, fungi, toxins for sepsis therapy
Medical News Today
Things can go downhill fast when a patient has sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which bacteria or fungi multiply in a patient's blood — often too fast for antibiotics to help. A new device inspired by the human spleen and developed by a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, may radically transform the way doctors treat sepsis.
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New finding could accelerate research to regenerate damaged tissue
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine via News-Medical.Net
Scientists at New York University Langone Medical Center have found a way to dramatically boost the efficiency of the process for turning adult cells into so-called pluripotent stem cells by combining three well-known compounds, including vitamin C. Using the new technique in mice, the researchers increased the number of stem cells obtained from adult skin cells by more than twentyfold compared with the standard method.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords WOUND HEALING.
 



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