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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit October 01, 2014


 

Glue inspired by shellfish aids wound-healing
Medical News Today
Shellfish, such as mussels and barnacles, secrete very sticky proteins that help them cling to rocks or ship hulls, even underwater. Inspired by these natural adhesives, a team of MIT engineers has designed new materials that could be used to repair ships or help heal wounds and surgical incisions.
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 Industry News


Effects of gravity on fluid-handling properties of wound dressings covered with compression bandages
WOUNDS
The management of exudate from leg ulcers remains a major challenge for healthcare practitioners. Many different dressings are available for this purpose, often used in conjunction with graduated external compression provided by extensible bandages applied in different configurations to achieve the required physiological effect. Although a significant amount of data has been published on the fluid-handling properties of some of these primary dressings, this has mainly been derived from laboratory studies using standard tests conducted in the horizontal plane.
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Cultures of diabetic foot ulcers without clinical signs of infection do not predict outcomes
American Diabetes Association
Researchers examined associations between ulcer bioburden and ulcer outcomes in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers that lacked clinical signs of infection.
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The quest for new antibiotics turns back to nature, genetics
By Rosemary Sparacio
With antibiotic resistance becoming an increasing problem in medical treatment, the search is on for new antibiotics, new sources for those antibiotics and new mechanisms. For thousands of years people have used products found in nature for their medicinal properties. A return to nature may be the next area in which we find antibiotics. Smaller pharmaceutical companies are still pursuing research and manufacturing, and they are submitting regulatory documents for new antibiotics to the FDA for their approval. But perhaps more promising is the work being done to look for novel mechanisms and to explore different areas in the search.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    A global perspective on wound care (Dr. Thomas E. Serena, Wound Healing Society)
Amino acid supplement helps diabetic foot wounds (Food Consumer)
Epidermolysis bullosa presents unique wound care challenges (Dermatology Times)
Wounds and the normal healing process (Nursing Careers Allied Health)
Important changes in cellular behavior that occur in rare, blistering skin disease (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


The amazing healing power of oxygen
The San Diego Union-Tribune
Oxygen is the most abundant chemical element in the Earth's biosphere and it is also an indispensable resource to most terrestrial life. Less known is the therapeutic use of oxygen as an important adjunctive treatment in the healing of various medical conditions, such as limb preservation.
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Reassessing your outpatient wound clinic: Building tomorrow's wound care facility today
Today's Wound Clinic
As we reassess our wound care, it might be useful to look back before we try to look ahead. Prior to 2000, the majority of outpatient wound care services for Medicare beneficiaries were provided in an office-based setting because Medicare did not have a formalized payment system for hospital-based outpatient wound care departments. Things changed on April 7, 2000, when the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services defined in the Federal Register a payment system referred to as the Medicare Outpatient Prospective Payment System. HOPDs began to emerge as a result of the new OPPS.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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