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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit November 19, 2014


 

Synthetic platelet-like nanoparticles for rapid wound hemostasis
Medgadget
Even though blood has the ability to coagulate, severe bleeding is still difficult to control since there are simply too few platelets to aggregate quickly enough to plug the wound. Researchers from University of California Santa Barbara and Case Western Reserve University have developed synthetic platelet-like nanoparticles that can be injected near a wound to act like natural platelets in helping to treat it.
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 Industry News


When is telehealth the right option?
McKnight's
Is providing telehealth right for you and your therapy company? As providers, patients and payers look for more cost-effective and efficient ways to provide healthcare, some are turning to telehealth as an option. Telehealth involves using electronic communication to provide healthcare information and services to a remote location. Telehealth has developed mostly in rural areas as a response to long distances between patients and providers, but is also being considered in other geographic and clinical settings.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword TELEHEALTH.


Olive oil accelerates wound healing in burn patients
Olive Oil Times
Past studies have shown that olive oil may be effective in the treatment and healing of skin burns, when used externally. Now, a new study published in the journal Burns showed that consuming olive oil can expedite the healing process, and work from within.
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Will patients pay for personalized medicine?
Life Science Leader Magazine
Editor-in-chief for Life Science Leader Magazine Rob Wright writes: In October, I attended a personalized medicine dinner discussion hosted at the Washington, D.C., offices of the National Journal. The discussion was developed into an upcoming feature, "Are You Prepared For The Pending Personalized Medicine Revolution?" in Life Science Leader magazine's December 2014 issue. One of the hot discussion topics revolved around who is going to pay for the various products and services that constitute personalized medicine. What I found interesting was the focus on insurance companies being willing to reimburse for the diagnostics, drugs and treatments and the absence of the patient having any financial skin in the game.
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Needles no more: Say hello to a tube of squeezable biologics
BioPharma-Reporter.com
Until now, topical biologics have been unpopular among developers because of permeation problems. But advances in technology and a push to stay competitive as patents expire have led drugmakers to identify new delivery methods, according to contract research organizations Kemwell and Tergus Pharma.
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University of Melbourne researcher explores impact of living with chronic wounds
University of Melbourne via News-Medical.Net
People who live with chronic wounds are often disadvantaged financially and emotionally and remain a hidden aspect of our healthcare system. A University of Melbourne researcher is looking at the impact of living with wounds that take more than four weeks to heal, such as venous leg ulcers, pressure ulcers and foot wounds, and the advantages of optimizing self-management for these patients.
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