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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit December 24, 2014


 
2014 Year In Review
As 2014 comes to a close, APWCA would hope its members, partners and other industry professionals enjoy a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of Wound Care Report a look at the top 20 most accessed articles from the year. We will split these in two issues. Top articles 1-10 will publish Dec. 24 and the top articles 11-20 will publish Dec. 31. Our regular publication will resume Wednesday, Jan. 7.


10. New techniques for the prevention, treatment of chronic sores
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology via Medical Xpress
From June 3: As the average age in our society continues to increase, more and more people are suffering from chronic sores. In an ideal world this would be preventable or at least the wounds could be treated so as to heal well without leaving scars. However current methods of treatment have only been partially successful and therefore there is great interest in new therapeutic techniques.
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9. Doctor develops simple treatment for flesh-eating disease
San Francisco Chronicle
From June 3:   Hypochlorous acid — which is made when chlorine is dissolved in water, but also produced naturally by the body's immune cells — is a common ingredient in cleansing solutions to treat necrotizing fasciitis, but it's usually mixed with other agents. Doctors would irrigate wounds from necrotizing fasciitis with this solution of hypochlorous acid that was developed by NovaBay Pharmaceuticals in Emeryville, California, then drain the wound with a negative-pressure vacuum apparatus. The NovaBay scientists say they're able to manufacture a pure solution of the acid in saline, which renders it both stronger and safer. The product, called NeutroPhase, is federally approved for cleaning wounds, but not for treatment of necrotizing fasciitis.
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8. Laser technology, RF ablation can effectively treat varicose ulcers
Pharmbiz.com
From July 29: Varicose ulcer, which was impossible to treat surgically, can now be treated with advanced medical technology within an hour's time. It occurs when valves in the veins start leaking into the skin, resulting in severe pain and immobility. Laser technology and radio frequency ablation are the latest two treatments available today.
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7. Breakthrough in fighting infections
Medical News Today
From July 15: Scientists at the University of Brighton have found a potential new weapon in the war on infections by identifying the bacterial genes involved. This new insight could lead to new methods of preventing infections and contribute to overcoming problems with antibiotic resistance.
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6. 1 possible answer to healing chronic diabetic foot ulcers
Diabetes In Control
From July 8: The exact mechanism by which diabetes impairs wound healing is not fully understood, but may include abnormal inflammatory cell response, impaired neovascularization, decreased synthesis of collagen and increased levels of proteinases. As a result of all of the unknowns, management of diabetic foot ulcers still represents a challenge in the medical community.
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5. ACHM consensus statement on physician credentialing for hyperbaric oxygen therapy
American College of Hyperbaric Medicine
From Aug. 20: The rise in specialized wound and hyperbaric centers across the United States has resulted in an increased need for physicians to administer hyperbaric oxygen therapy. However, there are no published national standards or recommendations for credentialing physicians for this service. The American College of Hyperbaric Medicine, established in 1985, is a 501(c)(6) professional organization founded to support the clinical applications and professional practice of HBOT and to serve the developing specialty of wound care. Quality assurance and improvement in the practice of hyperbaric medicine and educational activities to enhance the understanding of the scientific evidence supporting oxygen-based technologies in clinical practice are integral parts of the organization's mission.
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4. A global perspective on wound care
Dr. Thomas E. Serena, Wound Healing Society
From Sept. 17: At first glance, Dean Rafi, a distinguished college professor in oilrich Oman, would appear to have little in common with a diabetic woman from a poor rural province outside of Phnom Penh, Cambodia. I was professor Rafi's guest in Oman recently and he treated me to an age-old Arabian tradition: a feast in a tent in the desert. Sitting cross-legged on hand woven mats, we enjoyed an opulent meal. I lost track of the number of courses. I also had the opportunity to observe a more modern Middle Eastern tradition: before the meal, an assistant passed out small syringes. I watched as the guests pushed aside their dishdashas and injected themselves with insulin. "We are victims of our own success," commented Rafi.
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3. Easy-to-use IV antibiotics could help treat serious skin infections
HealthDay News via Doctors Lounge
From June 10:  Severe skin infections are often treated with IV antibiotics for days. But two new drugs — given once a week or just once — could offer an alternative, researchers report. The findings come from two independent studies published June 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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2. Research healing wounds 50 percent faster
WSET-TV
From July 1: Researchers at the Virginia Tech Carillon Research Institute are leading the way in new science that could help wounds heal in half the time. This is especially important for diabetics dealing with complications like foot ulcers. This research actually began in South Carolina, nearly a decade ago, but was imported to the Roanoke-based research center when one of the lead scientists was recruited to come work at the institute two years ago.
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1. Hospitals tout benefits of hyperbaric oxygen therapy
U.S. News & World Report
From Oct. 9: At first glance, the room resembles a scene from a science fiction movie: People lying in cylindrical chambers breathing 100 percent oxygen to boost the body's natural healing process and promote the growth of new blood vessels in areas ravaged by disease. It's actually a scene being replicated at hospitals across the country as more Americans turn to hyperbaric oxygen therapy to treat serious conditions, such as chronic wounds, diabetic foot ulcers, radiation injury, bone infections, burns, carbon monoxide poisoning, compromised skin grafts and more.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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