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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit December 31, 2014


 
2014 Year In Review
As 2014 comes to a close, APWCA would hope its members, partners and other industry professionals enjoy a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of Wound Care Report a look at the top 20 most accessed articles from the year. We will split these in two issues. Top articles 1-10 will publish Dec. 24 and the top articles 11-20 will publish Dec. 31. Our regular publication will resume Wednesday, Jan. 7.


10. Nurse converts corn pads into quick fix for minor diabetic ulcers
MedCity News
From Sept. 3: Corn pads probably are not the first remedy that pops up when people think of cost-effective ways to prevent diabetic ulcers from worsening to the point where patients need to be admitted to a hospital, or worse, have a foot amputated. But a nurse innovating on the job highlighted her discovery in a guest blog post on MakerNurse's website.
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9. 'Nanosheets' to protect from burn wound infections
Business Standard
From Aug. 13: A new "nano" coating technology promises to dress burn wounds, not only on the flat and broad part of human body, but also at curves, wrinkles and ridges to heal and control bacterial infections. The ultrathin coatings called "nanosheets" can cling to the body's most difficult-to-protect contours and keep bacteria at bay, Japanese researchers reported.
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8. New technology detects pathogens in soldiers' wounds
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory via Medical Xpress
From June 24: A biological detection technology developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists can detect bacterial pathogens in the wounds of U.S. soldiers that previously have been missed by other technologies. This advance may, in time, allow an improvement in how soldiers' wounds are treated.
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7. Skin infections: Practical guide for clinicians
Clinical Infectious Diseases via MedPage Today
From June 24: Accurate diagnosis is the key to treating skin and soft tissue infections, according to new practice guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America. While antibiotic treatment is life-saving in some cases, the guidelines stress that most skin and soft tissue infections are mild and will heal on their own.
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6. Epidermal grafting using a novel suction blister–harvesting system for treatment of pyoderma gangrenosum
JAMA Dermatology
From Aug. 27: Pyoderma gangrenosum is a neutrophilic dermatosis characterized by chronic, recurrent ulcerations of the skin. Currently, most first-line and second-line treatments are anecdotal and no gold standard treatment for PG exists. Although patients may respond to systemic medications aimed at reducing underlying inflammation associated with PG, in many cases, large wounds remain. Skin grafting is problematic because of the potential for pathergy, a phenomenon in which new or worsening ulcerations may develop following trauma or surgery. In addition, application of tissue-engineered skin often is not reimbursed; thus, limited clinical options exist to provide wound coverage.
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5. New drug delivered through a skin patch shows promise in healing diabetic foot ulcers
American College of Surgeons via Medical Xpress
From Oct. 30: A foot ulcer typically is a painful inconvenience to most people, but to a person with diabetes, it could mean an infection, or worse, an amputation. But a research team at Stanford University School of Medicine, California, has developed a drug delivered through a skin patch that not only helps foot wounds heal better, but also prevents those wounds from recurring, according to study results recently presented at the American College of Surgeons Annual Clinical Congress.
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4. Microbes of the skin
The Scientist
From June. 17: The microbial communities that inhabit the skin, perhaps the most diverse of the human body, are suspected to be key players in host defense. New evidence suggests that commensal skin bacteria both directly protect humans from pathogenic invaders and help the immune system maintain that delicate balance between effective protection and damaging inflammation. While causal links between the skin's commensal microbes and health or disease remain to be demonstrated, the clues that have accumulated in the last few years paint a suggestive picture.
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3. Your skin can 'sniff' certain aromas that help it heal faster
The Conversation
From July 8: Humans have about 350 different types of olfactory receptors in the nose, which detect odors and start a signaling process that then messages the brain. These receptors work together to give us a sense of smell. But the nose is not the only place where olfactory receptors are found. Cells of other tissues of the body use these receptors to react to chemical "odor" compounds. And we've discovered that their presence in skin cells can accelerate wound healing.
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2. Scientists take next step in skin wound treatment
American Chemical Society via ScienceDaily
From July 1: Treating wounds has become far more sophisticated than sewing stitches and applying gauze, but dressings still have shortcomings. Now scientists are reporting the next step in the evolution of wound treatment with a material that leads to faster healing than existing commercial dressings and prevents potentially harmful bacteria from sticking. Their study appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
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1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy saving life, limb for diabetics
Bahama Islands Info
From June 10: A few years after being diagnosed with diabetes, Dilith Nairn stepped on a tack and as often happens to diabetics, developed a wound that eventually became infected. When a team of physicians and wound care specialists at Doctors Hospital in Nassau, Bahamas, told him that his foot simply wasn't healing as they'd hoped, he knew all too well what his future could hold.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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