Washington Weekly
Sep. 28, 2015

Last Week

In a week focused on a historic first-time address to Congress by the Pope, the week culminated in news that turned the political world on its head, House Speaker John Boehner announcing his resignation. He is expected to step down from his office and district by October 31. The House spent much of the shortened week by passing legislation that would withhold funding for Planned Parenthood. The Senate held a pair of votes, but failed to achieve the 60 votes needed to advance the same House-passed bills that redirects funding from Planned Parenthood to other women's health service providers.More

This Week

Congress has two days to pass a budget in order to prevent another shutdown. The Senate is expected to kick things off tonight by voting on legislation that funds the government through December 11. Since the Senate tried and failed to advance a budget that would withhold funding for Planned Parenthood as expected, they're likely pass a clean, short-term budget, which will also likely pass the House with Democratic help to compensate for the numerous Republican defections. The House will continue taking up legislative measures that go after Planned Parenthood, including this week's vote on a bill that would allow states to withhold Medicaid funding from providers that conduct abortions. More

Item of Interest

With Speaker Boehner announcing his departure, jockeying is already underway to replace him. The odds on favorite is Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), currently the House Majority Leader. While he is currently expected to win, it is not a guarantee. Members are also lining up to replace him (McCarthy), and that fight is far less certain. In the race to succeed McCarthy as leader, Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) and House Republican Conference chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash.) are both running, with others looking closely at the race. Chief Deputy Whip Patrick McHenry (R-N.C.), Rep. Dennis Ross (R-Fla.), and Rep. Markwayne Mullin (R-Okla.) are all looking to run for Majority Whip. Reports are already circulating that former Deputy Whip Peter Roskam, who ran unsuccessfully for Whip after Majority Leader Eric Cantor lost his primary and caused a leadership shake-up, is eying a move up the leadership ladder, as is Rules Committee Chairmen who brings the backing of the Texas delegation.More

How John Boehner's Speakership Stacks Up
National Journal
House Speak­er John Boehner an­nounced Sept. 25 that he plans to resign from Con­gress, effect­ive at the end of Oc­to­ber. Long un­der fire from fel­low House con­ser­vat­ives, he will leave the speak­er's of­fice after nearly five years in the role. How does Boehner's ten­ure as House speak­er meas­ure up against oth­er speak­ers in re­cent his­tory? Not par­tic­u­larly well — though serving with a Demo­crat­ic pres­id­ent certainly didn't help.More

Shutdown Clash to Return in Force by December
Politico
The immediate threat of a government shutdown is all but gone for now. But it will return with a vengeance soon. Once a high-stakes confrontation over Planned Parenthood, the government funding fight dissipated with Speaker John Boehner's surprising resignation announcement Sept. 25, which removed any doubt that he would tee up a clean spending bill on the House floor this week. More

Will Speakers Ever Again be Able to Stay on Their Own Terms?
Roll Call
Speaker John A. Boehner's resignation continues, and possibly cements, a remarkable pattern in modern American politics. The most powerful position in Congress has also become one of the most unstable jobs in American government. After almost a century of orderly departures and orchestrated transitions, 5 of the 6 most recent speakers of the House have now been pushed from the Capitol by circumstances they could not control.More

Every Photo You Need to See from Pope Francis' Washington Visit
Politico
Pope Francis arrived in the United States on Sept. 22 for his first visit ever – and his packed schedule has him making 18 stops along the East Coast over the course of six days. POLITICO takes you there, in pictures. More